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The Architecture of Mindfulness

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In the age of social media, the 24-hour news cycle, and an overwhelming pressure to become "successful," there is a marked lack of personal connection within communities and a constant state of stress and overwork. This constant state of stress

In the age of social media, the 24-hour news cycle, and an overwhelming pressure to become "successful," there is a marked lack of personal connection within communities and a constant state of stress and overwork. This constant state of stress then builds into anxiety, as there are few public resources for mental reprieve. The World Health Organization reports that anxiety disorders are the most common mental disorders worldwide, begging the question as to how they can be addressed most effectively worldwide. As design is implicit within any environment that provides for mental wellness, it must be carefully curated to provide not only the physical necessities, but speak for something beyond explanation- a sense of mental refuge and comfort. Using the concept of mindfulness, architecture has the power to force users to truly be present in the experience, activating space to become a mental refuge rather than a passive infrastructure.

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2018-05

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Contemporary Architecture of the Catholic Church in Suburban Phoenix

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This thesis is a study of the potential of the contemporary Catholic church building in suburban Phoenix. The project seeks to develop a church that responds to the values of Pope Francis and to typical suburban development issues of modern

This thesis is a study of the potential of the contemporary Catholic church building in suburban Phoenix. The project seeks to develop a church that responds to the values of Pope Francis and to typical suburban development issues of modern cities. Through research, case studies, writing, and design, the project makes proposals about how our churches should be designed and built today and in the future.

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Date Created
2017-05

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Architecture and Bicycling in the Contemporary City

Description

As it currently stands, implementation of the bicycle into urban conditions is an afterthought. Cyclists face numerous safety concerns on a daily basis that are avoidable. Congestion within cities increases as available space within cities decreases. In addition, the energy

As it currently stands, implementation of the bicycle into urban conditions is an afterthought. Cyclists face numerous safety concerns on a daily basis that are avoidable. Congestion within cities increases as available space within cities decreases. In addition, the energy and environmental crisis mandates the resolution of personal transportation methods. The opportunity for implementation of the bicycle is now, however the current infrastructure of the city of Tempe cannot sustain the bicyclist. Through the proposal of an architectural solution to the addition of the bicycle as a means of transportation in Tempe, this project aims to resolve the aforementioned issues of lack of space for cyclists, safety for cyclists, congestion and space availability in cities, as well as the environmental/energy crisis. This project questions where does the architect fit into the solution to Tempe's, transportation and energy crisis, in what way does the bicycle become the resolution to this issue, and how does a model of an architectural and infrastructural solution to the integration of the bicycle in the city of Tempe adapt to and work with the in-place system to positively effect the nature of which cities are designed in the United States. In addition, how does the architecture of a city resolve these issues? Focused on downtown Tempe, Cyclescape aims to resolve the aforementioned issues within Tempe, as well as have implications towards other US current and future cities with their strategies and philosophies on architecture, infrastructure, and the bicycle.

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2017-05

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Redefining the Learning Experience: A New Curriculum and Academic Environment for Children Ages 11-13

Description

This project has the intent of redefining the learning experience of children ages 11-13 through student-centered design that of provides a beneficial environment for emotional, social, and physical health in which students can become more independent in both accountability of

This project has the intent of redefining the learning experience of children ages 11-13 through student-centered design that of provides a beneficial environment for emotional, social, and physical health in which students can become more independent in both accountability of actions and in their thinking to see the larger picture and real-world application of each topic they learn and to foster thinking at a global scale. This is to be completed through the focus on the cognitive development and physical needs of the children at this age, a combination of the pedagogical models of inquiry-based, project-based, and community-based learning, connection to resources, implementation of design completed with understanding and testing of learning and working collaborative spaces, emphasizing the biophilic experience.

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2017-05

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What's for Dinner?

Description

Food’s implication on culture and agriculture challenges agriculture’s identity in the age of the city. As architect and author Carolyn Steel explained, “we live in a world shaped by food, and if we realize that, we can use food as

Food’s implication on culture and agriculture challenges agriculture’s identity in the age of the city. As architect and author Carolyn Steel explained, “we live in a world shaped by food, and if we realize that, we can use food as a powerful tool — a conceptual tool, design tool, to shape the world differently. It triggers a new way of thinking about the problem, recognizing that food is not a commodity; it is life, it is culture, it’s us. It’s how we evolved.” If the passage of food culture is dependent upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations, the learning environments should reflect this tenability in its systematic and architectural approach.

Through an investigation of agriculture and cuisine and its consequential influence on culture, education, and design, the following project intends to reconceptualize the learning environment in order facilitate place-based practices. Challenging our cognitive dissonant relationship with food, the design proposal establishes a food identity through an imposition of urban agriculture and culinary design onto the school environment. Working in conjunction with the New American University’s mission, the design serves as a didactic medium between food, education, and architecture in designing the way we eat.

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2017-05

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Adaptive and Interactive Architecture

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I devote my thesis to the practice of adaptive architecture and parametric design. The interactive and adaptive design would be my interest and my research thesis will be the process of exploring the architectural potentials of computer-programmed architectural design which

I devote my thesis to the practice of adaptive architecture and parametric design. The interactive and adaptive design would be my interest and my research thesis will be the process of exploring the architectural potentials of computer-programmed architectural design which interact with human beings. Start with the adaptive architectural theory of Neil Leach and Sou Fujimoto's architectural theory of architecture type, I explore and test the possibilities with current tools. I did reseach on the current study and practice of adaptive and interactive architecture in 20 century. After a series of study and experiment, I decided to make the "mirror" as a portal of inside and outside a building indicating a vague spacial relationship instead of just a normal mechanic mirror. The "mirror" will able to translate the information captured from motion to another "language" presented by movable materials to surrounding people, which provides people space to reflect and interact with each other. And the device would be the prototype of my thesis. The exploration of technology in the field of architecture really attracts me. I enjoy the design process and the final product. I will pay attention to new technologies in the future and try to combine technology, art and architecture together to create new experience.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Calle Rasquache: Biomimetically Designing Buckeye Road for Everyday Urbanism

Description

Promoted by the city to increase land values and provide jobs in the barrios of South Phoenix, industry became a force of massive disturbance along Buckeye Road, interrupting the residential scale with large industrial lots, many of which have been

Promoted by the city to increase land values and provide jobs in the barrios of South Phoenix, industry became a force of massive disturbance along Buckeye Road, interrupting the residential scale with large industrial lots, many of which have been abandoned. However, latent in the landscape are remnants of better times in the vibrant gestures of everyday urbanism.
Inspired by this palate of lively, idiosyncratic street designs—created out of necessity by people making-do—this project seeks to bring identity, value, and vitality to this challenging human environment.
This project uses concepts and processes of disturbance ecology and ecological succession, specifically the role played by pioneer species and biological legacies in the immediate aftermath of the eruption of Mount St. Helens, to develop an urban revitalization plan for Buckeye Road.

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Date Created
2016-05

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The Necessity of Biophilic Design in Architecture: The Herberger Young Scholars Academy

Description

Traditional educational infrastructures and their corresponding architectures have degenerated to work in opposition to today's scholastic objectives. In consideration of the necessity of formal education and academic success in modern society, a re-imagination of the ideal educational model and its

Traditional educational infrastructures and their corresponding architectures have degenerated to work in opposition to today's scholastic objectives. In consideration of the necessity of formal education and academic success in modern society, a re-imagination of the ideal educational model and its architectural equivalent is long overdue. Fortunately, the constituents of a successful instructional method exist just outside our windows. This thesis, completed in conjunction with the ADE422 architectural studio, seeks to identify the qualities of a new educational paradigm and its architectural manifestation through an exploration of nature and biophilic design. Architectural Studio IV was challenged to develop a new academic model and corresponding architectural integration for the Herberger Young Scholars Academy, an educational institution for exceptionally gifted junior high and high school students, located on the West Campus of Arizona State University. A commencing investigation of pre-established educational methods and practices evaluated compulsory academic values, concepts, theories, and principles. External examination of scientific studies and literature regarding the functions of nature within a scholastic setting assisted in the process of developing a novel educational paradigm. A study of game play and its relation to the learning process also proved integral to the development of a new archetype. A hypothesis was developed, asserting that a nature-centric educational model was ideal. Architectural case studies were assessed to determine applicable qualities for a new nature-architecture integration. An architectural manifestation was tested within the program of the Herberger Young Scholars Academy and through the ideal functions of nature within an academic context.

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2016-05

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Design & Community Development: The Built Environment's Role in the Health of Native American Communities

Description

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies. I believe that the design of a community's buildings can

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies. I believe that the design of a community's buildings can greatly affect the health of the community. This thesis focuses on the social aspects of design. How might we enhance the social capital of Native communities through the built environment?

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2014-12

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Life Reconnected: Urban Biophilic Microdwelling Communities

Description

While there is a growing desire for sustainable urban living, Downtown Phoenix remains a fragmented landscape with vacant land, underutilized areas, and a detrimental imbalance between commercial and residential uses. This project aims to fulfill this desire by connecting these

While there is a growing desire for sustainable urban living, Downtown Phoenix remains a fragmented landscape with vacant land, underutilized areas, and a detrimental imbalance between commercial and residential uses. This project aims to fulfill this desire by connecting these landscapes to form a cohesive and ecologically viable urban fabric which will increase the well-being of people and natural systems through increased biodiversity, ecological awareness, and a greater occupation of the public sphere. Biophilic microdwelling communities, strategically inserted into Downtown Phoenix, can recover underutilized areas, create more urban housing, and introduce native species which will begin to transform vacant sites to create a cohesive urban frabric. As water, food, and refuge draw more organisms, a biologically diverse urban ecosystem will emerge and spread throughout the urban area, redefining the future of the city. The increased emphasis on social living in this new biophilic setting will strengthen personal and ecological well-being. After considering many varied interests and looking at what is most concerning in the world today, this thesis is devoted to the sustainable transformation of Phoenix, Arizona. A relatively new city, Phoenix is at a turning point in its development and is poised on the brink of defining itself for the future. The current paradigms of autocentric sprawl and habitat destruction have been challenged and new ideas developed. Phoenix is in a unique position to be able to begin a new sustainable type of progress. The process has already begun with high-density buildings and housing infiltrating Downtown, along with cultural amenities for the new occupants. However, the city currently remains much as it was after the abandonment of the mid 20th century when most residents left for the surrounding suburbs. Vacant lots and underutilized areas fragment the urban landscape, creating an undesirable environment for both humans and native desert organisms. The lack of residential development exacerbates the sense of abandonment as the city shuts down after business hours. The housing that does exist is typically high rise luxury apartments or condos wherein the resident is far removed from city life. The growing desire and need for housing which is affordable for young professionals or students and aimed to engage the city and streetscape has not been developed. The resulting emptiness has created a wound in the urban fabric that is only now beginning to heal, and it is how this wound will heal that will define the future of the city. Will the future development force the traditional unsustainable paradigm into being only to inevitably fail, or will a new sustainable paradigm, guided not by typical planning or thought processes but by unique conditions of the region and input from contemporary users, redefine Phoenix and set a precedent for the redevelopment of other cities? This project seeks to fulfill these desires by providing biophilic micro housing capable of acting as a catalyst for urban transformation. Some of the most underutilized and disruptive features of Downtown Phoenix are the parking garages. They often occupy an entire block and disrupt the streetscape with the detriment of single functionality. The location of these garages, however, is ideal for an urban housing and ecology catalyst based on surrounding resources and they would serve as insertion points for additive development. A greater diversity of habitat for both people and native species through a network of strategically placed, biologically loaded microdwelling communities which leverage these underutilized structures can meet this need and improve the well-being of residents of all species and the natural systems of the urban ecology.

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2016-05