Matching Items (96)

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Free Bird: Preventing Sexual Assault on College Campuses

Description

Sexual assault affects hundreds of thousands of individuals every year. College students are especially at risk as women ages 18-24 are 3 times more likely to be a victim of sexual assault than other females (Campus Sexual Violence, n.d.). Because

Sexual assault affects hundreds of thousands of individuals every year. College students are especially at risk as women ages 18-24 are 3 times more likely to be a victim of sexual assault than other females (Campus Sexual Violence, n.d.). Because victims of sexual assault can experience negative sequelae for weeks, months, and even years after the incident occurs, it is critical to provide them with easily accessible help and guidance. For my thesis project, I investigated how sexual assault influences these victims' lives as well as what help is readily accessible to them. After researching sexual assault in college students and reading through many websites, articles, and journals, I researched the types of information provided to sexual assault victims through the websites of national sexual violence organizations. I then coded the websites of Arizona colleges and universities (N = 10) for the topics covered in their sites. Because several of these colleges had inadequate material on their websites, I developed a website that would provide additional information to sexual assault survivors. The idea of Free Bird is to establish a safe space for victims of sexual assault to find information that will allow them to heal along their journey. I learned a lot while completing this project, and I hope that the creation of this website will allow others to become more educated on the topic and realize what a problem sexual assault is in our society today.

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2018-05

Development of Case Material for Confederates in Arizona State University Nursing Simulations

Description

This paper reviews a creative project designed to enhance the simulation experience for College of Nursing and Health Innovation nursing students at Arizona State University. Simulation allows students to practice imperative skills in a safe environment, free from the risk

This paper reviews a creative project designed to enhance the simulation experience for College of Nursing and Health Innovation nursing students at Arizona State University. Simulation allows students to practice imperative skills in a safe environment, free from the risk of injury to patients and the consequences of making these errors, in order to master skills that are essential in the clinical setting. Students are able to practice a wide range of invasive and noninvasive skills and hone in on their clinical judgement and critical thinking to make decisions that may be life threatening in a clinical situation. The group members designed written training materials and created corresponding video vignettes that would be utilized to enhance the confederate role and provide the students a deeper understanding of their simulated patient and the simulation scenario. The written training materials that were developed include confederate background information, patient and family education, and guided questions and answers for the video vignettes. The written training materials will be used to guide the students that are portraying the family member during the simulation. Trained standardized patients were hired to play the confederate role in the four video vignettes. The video vignettes portrayed interviews with a family member of the patient that delved into how they felt about their family member's hospitalization and what they hoped to learn from the nurses during their family member's hospitalization. The vignettes will be used to guide students to the needs of the patients and families in the corresponding scenarios. These vignettes will be accessible by students before the start of simulation in order to enhance understanding of the patient and ultimately, the scenario.

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2018-12

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Barret Nursing Mentorship Program: A Pilot Study

Description

Mentorship is important to learning because it provides a frame of reference and the guidance necessary to succeed for those who are inexperienced. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a one-semester mentorship program for freshman

Mentorship is important to learning because it provides a frame of reference and the guidance necessary to succeed for those who are inexperienced. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a one-semester mentorship program for freshman Barrett nursing students. Specifically, it was hypothesized that freshman Barrett nursing students (mentees) would experience higher levels of confidence as they enter their second year. With improved confidence and better preparation in handling stress, freshman Barrett students are more likely to stay in the Barrett program throughout their time at a university in the southwestern United States. The mentorship program included freshman Barrett students pursuing a degree in nursing as the mentees and Term 8 (senior) Barrett Nursing students as the mentors. The mentorship program supported freshman students in reaching out to their mentors for study tips, class advice, homework help, and use them as a general resource throughout the application process. Quantitative data was collected in a pre- and post-survey in order to analyze the confidence scores of mentors and mentees. The survey asked participants questions regarding their level of self-confidence and asked them to rank their responses on a Likert scale with 1 being strongly disagree and 5 being strongly agree. The results showed that confidence levels based on the quantitative data either stayed the same or was improved in every participant. Specifically, there were multiple statistically significant findings based on the paired t-tests that were run. Findings suggest the mentorship program improved the confidence levels in both freshman Barrett students and their Senior mentors.

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2018-12

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Coping Skills Used by Nurses After the Death of a Pediatric Patient

Description

As the complexity and severity of hospitalized patients increase, nurses working in an acute care setting will experience patient deaths. From novice to expert, nurses may utilize a range of coping strategies. When the patient is a pediatric patient, the

As the complexity and severity of hospitalized patients increase, nurses working in an acute care setting will experience patient deaths. From novice to expert, nurses may utilize a range of coping strategies. When the patient is a pediatric patient, the coping strategies become critical. The purpose of this study is to explore the coping strategies used by novice and expert nurses when a pediatric patient dies. The second objective is to compare the coping strategies used by novice and expert nurses. The final objective is to determine if nurses feel nursing school and employee training prepared them for the death of a pediatric patient. Research has shown that nurses use many different coping strategies when faced with a patient's death (Abdullah, 2015; Kellogg, Baker, & McCune, 2014; Plante & Cry, 2011). Expert nurses who have years of experience should have more options for coping strategies than novice nurses, yet there is little evidence to support this. This qualitative descriptive study used structured in-depth interviews to explore the coping strategies of pediatric nurses when experiencing a patient's death. Using thematic analysis, transcripts of the interviews were coded such that themes emerged. Themes for novice nurses were compared to expert nurses. These themes were also placed into concepts that encompassed many similar themes. The findings help determine that there is a difference in the coping mechanisms used by novice and expert nurses, and there is a need for more education on coping strategies after the death of a pediatric patient.

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2017-05

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Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes of Perinatal Substance Abuse

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Objectives: To measure nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding, assess nurses' attitudes towards perinatal substance abuse, and identify the perception of breastfeeding infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Design: Descriptive study. Setting: Online survey. Participants: Nurses (N=104) who are members of

Objectives: To measure nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding, assess nurses' attitudes towards perinatal substance abuse, and identify the perception of breastfeeding infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Design: Descriptive study. Setting: Online survey. Participants: Nurses (N=104) who are members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and subscribe to their perinatal listserv were invited to participate via email. Methods: Participants completed a survey, which included a modified version of the Attitudes about Drug Abuse in Pregnancy (AADAP) questionnaire, knowledge questions, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Statistical analysis was conducted. Results: Most nurses (88.46%) have cared for a newborn affected by NAS or their mother before, and every respondent has cared for an opioid-addicted patient. Most nurse respondents (82.69%) reported breastfeeding being a very common topic of discussion with patients, yet 78 (75%) reported being poorly prepared by nursing school in this topic. Despite this, the majority answered the knowledge questions correctly. Most respondents (94.23%) reported that they would assess the possibility of breastfeeding for women who used drugs during pregnancy, and 39.42% expressed that prenatal drug use should be considered child abuse. Conclusion: Despite feeling angry at mothers who perinatally abuse drugs, nurses recognize the benefits of breastfeeding for these patients. Self-assessment can help nurses identify personal bias and implement evidence-based nursing interventions

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2018-05

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Increasing Access to Medical Care Through Scope of Practice Laws

Description

This paper sought to answer the question of how to improve the American healthcare system. The Affordable Care Act aimed to do this by increasing access to insurance. What this has done, however, is exacerbate the already rising rate of

This paper sought to answer the question of how to improve the American healthcare system. The Affordable Care Act aimed to do this by increasing access to insurance. What this has done, however, is exacerbate the already rising rate of physician shortages. As a way to fix this problem, it is suggested that state legislatures and the federal government adopt the rising trend of expanding scope of practice to the extent of the care providers' certification. This is a movement has garnered support throughout the country and 20 states already allow for nearly autonomous practice by advanced practice nurses (APNs). This paper looked at systematic review, peer-reviewed papers, state/federal legislation and labor statistics to demonstrate how this move could increase access to healthcare providers as well as decrease cost by nearly 25%. This paper also evaluated how to formalization of nursing education has had positive impacts on the French healthcare system. Additionally, it evaluated a more specific look at Arizona and used data provided by the Arizona Board of Nursing and The Arizona Medical Board to make a compelling argument as to why this is a viable option for solving the disparity between rural and urban healthcare. The conclusion of the paper was to push policy makers to make the statutory constraints of the profession closer to the certification the people receive in their education as opposed to relying on case law. Additionally, it would be helpful to use technological innovations, like project echo, to help these professionals practice in rural areas. This will ultimately lead to a healthcare system that better serves the needs of all populations, as well as decreasing the overall cost of care.

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2018-05

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Orthostatic Hypotension: Effective in Predicting Elderly Falls

Description

Falls are a leading cause of disability in the older population. In hospitalized patients, falls account for approximately 11,000 annual deaths in the U.S. (JCO, 2014). Falls can occur for a complexity of reasons. Orthostatic hypotension (OH), the change of

Falls are a leading cause of disability in the older population. In hospitalized patients, falls account for approximately 11,000 annual deaths in the U.S. (JCO, 2014). Falls can occur for a complexity of reasons. Orthostatic hypotension (OH), the change of blood pressure with position changes, is common amongst the elderly. Some believe that because of orthostatic symptoms, such as dizziness, change in vision, and vertigo, a patient is at higher risk for falling. However, the actual relationship of orthostatic hypotension to falls is uncertain. This project involves reviewing credible research studies to determine whether identifying positive orthostatic results in the elderly is an effective method for predicting a fall. The goal of this research is to apply the findings to the current method of Fall Risk evaluation in the Phoenix VA Medical Center (PVAMC) inpatient units. The consensus from the five research studies that were reviewed is that orthostatic hypotension is not a reliable predictor of falls in the elderly. These findings lead to the recommendation of utilizing the Morse Fall Scale as an evaluation tool for fall risk level. A comprehensive, individualized assessment to assess the risk of falls and complementary interventions is also recommended for a hospitalized patient. It is further suggested that a committee be formed to alert the appropriate staff of the designated Fall Risk level when utilizing the Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS) at the PVAMC. Proper evaluation of fall risk in hospitalized patients is critical in the prevention of falls and in providing high quality care.

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2017-05

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Christian Beliefs Surrounding End of Life Care

Description

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This study sought to investigate Christian end of life beliefs and

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This study sought to investigate Christian end of life beliefs and needs. A qualitative study design was used to explore end of life beliefs and needs of members from a non-denominational Christian church who self-declared their Christianity. A 10-item Assessment Tool on end of life needs and beliefs was created by this investigator and used in the study (Appendix 1). A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Notes and audio recordings were taken and later transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis including an open analysis and an axial analysis of the data. The open analysis identified trends and common concepts which were then categorized into broader themes during the axial analysis. Findings included several major themes that described the Christian population's end of life needs and beliefs. The major themes identified included: trust in God, beliefs about necessity of religious practices, lack of fear of death, similarities in religious rituals and practices, and a desire for quality of life. During a statistical analysis, findings revealed that 86% believed that pain and suffering should be treated and prevented. One hundred percent (100%) of the participants reported that their faith helped with their acceptance of death. An additional 64% stated that they did not fear death. The findings in this study can improve religious and cultural awareness for nurses and others in the healthcare field.

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2017-05

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An Approach to Assessing PTSD in Refugee Children

Description

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD. This creative project involved reviewing existing literature on refugees in the United States, child refugees, Erik Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, and available and applicable PTSD assessment tools. I developed a reference chart that compared the available assessment tools. I recognized that a PTSD assessment tool for refugee children does not exist. In response, I created an approach to assessing PTSD in refugee children ages 5-12. In creating this toolkit, I determined who is appropriate for administering the assessment, discovered how to create trust between the clinician and the child, created the assessment tool, including implementation instructions, and then provided directions on scoring and referrals. The tool itself is called the Child Refugee PTSD Assessment Tool (CRPAT-12). The creation of the CRPAT-12 will hopefully be disseminated and will encourage refugee resettlement organizations to assess children for PTSD upon intake. Early identification of symptoms of distress will help the child receive the appropriate treatment and will help prevent more extreme mental health complications.

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2017-05

Developing and Pilot Testing Digital Storytelling Interventions to Promote HPV Vaccinations among Vietnamese American Adolescents

Description

Significance Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting 79 million Americans today and an additional 14 million Americans becoming infected with HPV each year. HPV infection may lead to the development of genital warts

Significance Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting 79 million Americans today and an additional 14 million Americans becoming infected with HPV each year. HPV infection may lead to the development of genital warts and several types of cancers including both cervical and oropharyngeal cancers. The promotion of currently available HPV vaccines is important to prevent HPV transmission and reduce the prevalence of the comorbidities associated with infection. Promotion to Vietnamese-Americans in particular is important because of the increased rates of cervical cancers seen in this population. As Vietnamese-American mothers often act as the primary healthcare decision maker for their children, they were chosen as the target population for this intervention. Purpose: This study aims to (1) develop personal digital stories about HPV and HPV vaccination among Vietnamese women with adolescent children who are vaccinated against HPV; and (2) share these stories with a group of Vietnamese American mothers and assess the effect of the stories in changing the attitudes, beliefs, and intention to vaccinate for HPV. Methods: This study used a two-step process to design, implement, and evaluate digital stories to improve Vietnamese mothers' attitudes, beliefs, and intention to vaccinate their adolescent children against HPV. The first step was a formative research design to develop the digital stories. The second step was quasi-experimental with a pre and posttest design to evaluate the effect of the stories. Results: The first phase has produced two digital stories which will be screened recruitment has been completed for phase two. Content analysis showed the importance of community resources, the desire to protect children, a history of familial and/or personal cancer, concerns about side effects, and the influence of healthcare providers as themes in both stories. Recruitment efforts are underway to recruit eligible Vietnamese mothers to assess the effect of these stories. Data collection is ongoing. Conclusions and lessons learned: The project has yielded two digital stories and recruitment for phase two is underway. This project has been successful in obtaining IRB approval, recruiting phase one participants, holding a digital storytelling workshop, designing the phase two survey, and beginning data collection efforts. The phase two recruitment has been challenging and will necessitate a change in strategy to find participants.

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2017-05