Matching Items (122)

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Organizational Structures and Leadership Challenges Within Private Law Firms

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This thesis will focus on the organizational structures and leadership challenges within private law firms. It begins by explaining the different roles within the organizational structure. It will then discuss

This thesis will focus on the organizational structures and leadership challenges within private law firms. It begins by explaining the different roles within the organizational structure. It will then discuss various other duties that are carried out by lawyers in addition to legal work. Through the use of qualitative methodology, including a review of scholarly literature and semi-formal interviews with private firm partners, this research mainly focuses on the challenges that exist in private law firms. The study concludes with possible solutions to address the discussed challenges in private law firms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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A Comparative Study of the Employee Experience in the United States and Denmark

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Abstract The United States continues to face problems in the workplace in regards to happiness, satisfaction, and engagement. In comparison, Denmark consistently ranks as one of the happiest countries in

Abstract The United States continues to face problems in the workplace in regards to happiness, satisfaction, and engagement. In comparison, Denmark consistently ranks as one of the happiest countries in the world. This paper serves to describe the norms and cultural aspects that may explain why each country has its respective outcomes in regards to the employee experience. The paper concludes with possible recommendations that organizations can adopt to help improve the employee experience in the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Effects of Generational Change in Employee Identity on Management

Description

Many theorists, corporations, and employers have struggled to foster an employee identity that benefits both the company and those working for it. Corporations have looked at ways to align its

Many theorists, corporations, and employers have struggled to foster an employee identity that benefits both the company and those working for it. Corporations have looked at ways to align its corporate identity and organizational identity in hopes that its employees will discern values similar to their own and identify with the organization. Companies hope this in turn will cause employees to support their organization, allow them to experience a stronger sense of loyalty to their company, and as a result, be retained for longer by their employers. As more millennials continue to enter the workforce, this need for retention through aligned identification with a company is even more significant. In this article we will strive to explain why corporations have had such difficulty retaining millennials, and why this generation is viewed as so hard to manage. We will do this by examining different forms of identity in a company, and isolating key millennial traits that may affect how they view their own employee identity. We will introduce the idea that millennials are stuck in a phase of neutral organizational identification, and that this is caused by a lack of alignment between what they, and the company, view as valuable. We will explore the need for companies to redefine their organizational identity to better match this new generation's needs, and discern whether an alignment between the two can be met. The concept of a generationally lower sense of self-categorization, affecting their ability to identify with their organization, will also be explored. In addition, we will discuss the idea that the largest struggle for millennial retention is caused by an inconsistency with their current job and their job expectations based on a lack of balance between their current degree of employee identification, and their idealized expectations. With these hypotheses, we will then discuss management suggestions, as well as possible further research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Social Enterprises: What Allows them to be Successful

Description

Social enterprises strive to tackle social problems, improve the lives of the people around them and help create a sustainable environment. Three specific enterprises will be analyzed to illustrate the

Social enterprises strive to tackle social problems, improve the lives of the people around them and help create a sustainable environment. Three specific enterprises will be analyzed to illustrate the differences between management styles, mission, financials and overall successes. There are numerous social enterprises in the southwest of the United States of America, some show more success than others, but what separates them? What commonalities do some of these enterprises share that allow them to be more successful than the rest? Is there a common denominator for enterprises to follow that will allow them to have success financially as well as accomplish their goals to better the community around them? Free Arts for Abused Children or Arizona, Seed Spot and Goodmans, we are able to better distinguish what factors allow enterprises to succeed. Due to the nature of social enterprises being able to be qualified as different types of organizations, i.e., company with shareholders, nonprofit organizations, etc. it is difficult to pin point a concrete model social enterprises should follow today. However, a finding that made all three of these social enterprises successful were their governance and ownership structures. Each enterprise consisted of a board that helped the enterprise stay on track with their given mission. Boards are also responsible for making major decisions that can impact the organization as well as being responsible for fundraising and making various financial decisions. After analyzing their structures, it was evident that all three enterprises consisted of strong governance structures. Although enterprises may not be able to follow a distinct model in order to be successful, they are able to place a board in control that aligns with the social enterprises mission and has a variety of knowledge that allows the board to make sound decisions. Keywords: social enterprise, management, governance, success, mission, financials

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

The Adaptations of International Management Styles due to the Technological Era

Description

Through this thesis we studied and interviewed 6 international business managers that oversee employees in countless countries, and the continents of where they work include: Europe, The Americas, Asia, and

Through this thesis we studied and interviewed 6 international business managers that oversee employees in countless countries, and the continents of where they work include: Europe, The Americas, Asia, and Africa. These six managers include: David Kuehn and Ann Marie Griffith from the United States; Bogdan Maliszewski from Poland; Denisa Madarova from the Czech Republic; Gert Schmidts from Germany; and Fer Amkreutz from the Netherlands. Per our interview questions, we discussed how these international managers view their company and culture, the external environment, the cultures they work with and oversee, and the future of international management in regards to a universal value system for business. Our questions were constructed using Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions so that we could better understand how Hofstede's Dimensions have changed due to the technological era, in regards to International Management Styles. In the end, we discovered that there is an undeniable change in how international managers are leading their teams. Throughout the business world, cultural dimensions are changing and are becoming more inclusive of other cultures. This allows managers to lead international teams more effectively and efficiently.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Comparison and Analysis: Leadership Variations between Chinese and American Business Culture

Description

Although there are some key qualities that all good leaders employ, variations in effective leadership approaches are evident across different cultures. This project sought to compare and analyze the differences

Although there are some key qualities that all good leaders employ, variations in effective leadership approaches are evident across different cultures. This project sought to compare and analyze the differences and similarities in leadership principles between Chinese and American business cultures, with emphasis on the divergence caused by the influences of history, culture and politics.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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The Struggles of the Community Assistant Position at Universities: A Managerial Approach

Description

The Community Assistant position at Arizona State University is dealing with an issue of poor year-to-year retention. Currently, a large number of Community Assistants who could return for another year

The Community Assistant position at Arizona State University is dealing with an issue of poor year-to-year retention. Currently, a large number of Community Assistants who could return for another year are choosing not to, which is further exacerbated by the fact that graduating Community Assistants cannot stay even if they wanted to because the position must be held by active students. Through research, interviews, and testimony, this paper constructs what the Community Assistant role entails and the priorities that the role instills in current Community Assistants at ASU. It then seeks to answer the question of why low levels of year-to-year retention matter and why so many are choosing to move to different positions after their first year has ended. By building from the information provided by current Community Assistants and various management theories from a variety of sources, this paper offers actionable recommendations for Arizona State University Housing to increase retention and motivation within the Community Assistant position.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Long Lines: Looking at The Starbucks On Campus from A Business Process Management Perspective

Description

This project aimed to find implementable solutions to the long flow times at the Starbucks locations on campus. Surveys of the consumers indicated a dissatisfaction rating of 29%, neutral rating

This project aimed to find implementable solutions to the long flow times at the Starbucks locations on campus. Surveys of the consumers indicated a dissatisfaction rating of 29%, neutral rating of 29% and satisfaction rating of 42%. Showing room for improvement in satisfaction, respondents were asked if a decrease in flow time or if mobile ordering was implemented would affect their frequency, over 50% responded that it would increase their frequency. Implementation of a mobile ordering system into the ASU app or separating the register line into M&G only and then cash and card only, is recommended to decrease the flow time.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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The Irish Do It Better: A Cross-Cultural Motivation Study

Description

In recent years, companies have been expanding their business efforts on a global scale. This project explores this expansion of American-based multinational corporations (MNCs) in Ireland, and the comparison of

In recent years, companies have been expanding their business efforts on a global scale. This project explores this expansion of American-based multinational corporations (MNCs) in Ireland, and the comparison of how their culture motivation in the workplace. We did a cultural study using Hofstede and Trompenaars' cultural dimensions of the two countries then used McClelland's Needs Theory, Equity Theory, and Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory in order to create three research questions. (1) How does the manager define success for the firm as a whole and for their employees, (2) How is the definition of success reflected in the company's corporate culture (i.e. values, norms and practices), along with how cultural values, norms and practices affect the company, and (3) How do external forces (i.e. governmental factors, workplace technology, etc.) affect the workplace environment and motivation for employees? With these we hypothesized that for research question 1, we hypothesized that from our study of Hofstede's and Trompenaars' cultural frameworks, Irish employees will show a greater tendency to favor affiliation, nAff, as opposed to a need for achievement, nAch, in American employees, according to McClelland's Needs Theory. For research question 2, we predicted that motivation would be administered through style of feedback to employees and office norms, such as autonomy, flexible hours, and work-life balance. For research question 3, we hypothesized that Ireland would have an impact from external factors such as government and technology, whereas the U.S. employees would face no clear impact. We conducted eight, qualitative interviews using a questionnaire, either in person or via video conference. The interviewees were all managers in some facet and have all had some international experience. Through the analysis of the interviews, we found that the Irish employees focused on how employees are able to help or contribute to a group (nAff), instead of looking at how the contribution of a group can be used to meet individual goals (nAch). The American companies reflected Trompenaars' definition of individualism in which employees focus on collaborating in teams, as long as individual goals are met, and benchmarked collaboration as a performance measure, tying in the need for achievement, for research question one. For the second research question, we found that employees in Ireland had a focus on teamwork in the workplace and much higher respect for work-life balance. American firms, in contrast, had a greater focus on making sure employees were contributing, meeting their goals, and getting their work done. While American firms did acknowledge work-life balance and its importance, there was a priority for coming in early and/or staying late to make sure a job got done. Findings for our third question showed that government factors did impact Ireland more, due to labor laws such as required vacation days in Ireland, and that technology had less of an impact than expected, for both countries. More importantly was our finding that the companies in Ireland were greatly impacted by the decisions made by the business executives in the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Effects of Positive Interpersonal Relationships on Retention and Motivation in the Workplace: A Case Study

Description

This thesis analyzes the importance of positive relationships between managers and their
employees. It attempts to define what a positive work relationship is and how it can influence the

This thesis analyzes the importance of positive relationships between managers and their
employees. It attempts to define what a positive work relationship is and how it can influence the
work environment. Through information found from case studies and surveys it is clear that a
good manager, as defined in this work, has a large impact on employee job satisfaction,
motivation and perceived retention rate. Using popular theories and studies I will show the
support I have for the analysis of my results as well as studies which prove my results to be
flawed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05