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Addressing Childhood Trauma in the Classroom

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Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of

Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of maltreated children, the one sure sanctuary is school. However, this idea requires teachers to be actively involved in identifying and caring for the children who need it most. Traumatic childhood experiences leave lasting scars on its victims, so it is helpful if teachers learn how to identify and support children who have lived through them. It is unfortunate that teachers will most likely encounter children throughout their career who have experienced horrendous things, but it is a reality. With this being said, teachers need to develop an understanding of what traumatized children live with, and learn how to address these issues with skilled sensitivity. Schools are not just a place where children learn how to read and write; they build the foundation for a successful life. This project was designed to provide teachers with a necessary resource for helping children who have suffered traumatic experiences. The methodology of this project began with interviews with organizations specializing in working with traumatized children such as Arizonans for Children, Free Arts for Abused Children, The Sojourner Center, and UMOM. The next step was a review of the current literature on the subject of childhood trauma. The findings have all been compiled into one, convenient document for teacher use and distribution. Upon completion of this document, an interactive video presentation will be made available through an online education website, so that distribution will be made simpler. Hopefully, teachers will share the information with people in their networks and create a chain reaction. The goal is to make it available to as many teachers as possible, so that more children will receive the support they need.

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2016-05

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Rolling Down Ramps: A Unit Plan to Address the Urgent Need of STEM Instruction in Preschool

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STEM education stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and is necessary for students to keep up with global competition in the changing job market, technological advancements and challenges of the future. However, American students are lacking STEM achievement at

STEM education stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and is necessary for students to keep up with global competition in the changing job market, technological advancements and challenges of the future. However, American students are lacking STEM achievement at the state, national and global levels. To combat this lack of achievement I propose that STEM instruction should begin in preschool, be integrated into the curriculum and be inquiry based. To support this proposal I created a month-long physics unit for preschoolers in a Head Start classroom. Students investigated the affect of incline, friction and weight on the distance of a rolling object, while developing their pre-math, pre-literacy and social emotional skills.

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2015-05

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Hafnium oxide as an alternative barrier to aluminum oxide for thermally stable niobium tunnel junctions

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In this research, our goal was to fabricate Josephson junctions that can be stably processed at 300°C or higher. With the purpose of integrating Josephson junction fabrication with the current semiconductor circuit fabrication process, back-end process temperatures (>350 °C) will

In this research, our goal was to fabricate Josephson junctions that can be stably processed at 300°C or higher. With the purpose of integrating Josephson junction fabrication with the current semiconductor circuit fabrication process, back-end process temperatures (>350 °C) will be a key for producing large scale junction circuits reliably, which requires the junctions to be more thermally stable than current Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb junctions. Based on thermodynamics, Hf was chosen to produce thermally stable Nb/Hf-HfOx/Nb superconductor tunnel Josephson junctions that can be grown or processed at elevated temperatures. Also elevated synthesis temperatures improve the structural and electrical properties of Nb electrode layers that could potentially improve junction device performance. The refractory nature of Hf, HfO2 and Nb allow for the formation of flat, abrupt and thermally-stable interfaces. But the current Al-based barrier will have problems when using with high-temperature grown and high-quality Nb. So our work is aimed at using Nb grown at elevated temperatures to fabricate thermally stable Josephson tunnel junctions. As a junction barrier metal, Hf was studied and compared with the traditional Al-barrier material. We have proved that Hf-HfOx is a good barrier candidate for high-temperature synthesized Josephson junction. Hf deposited at 500 °C on Nb forms flat and chemically abrupt interfaces. Nb/Hf-HfOx/Nb Josephson junctions were synthesized, fabricated and characterized with different oxidizing conditions. The results of materials characterization and junction electrical measurements are reported and analyzed. We have improved the annealing stability of Nb junctions and also used high-quality Nb grown at 500 °C as the bottom electrode successfully. Adding a buffer layer or multiple oxidation steps improves the annealing stability of Josephson junctions. We also have attempted to use the Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) method for the growth of Hf oxide as the junction barrier and got tunneling results.

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Date Created
2013

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Characterization of MBE Grown Metal, Semiconductor and Superconductor Films and Interfaces by Concurrent Use of In Situ Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED) and Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (REELS)

Description

This work is an investigation into the information provided by the concurrent use of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS). The two analytical methods were employed during growth of metal, semiconductor

This work is an investigation into the information provided by the concurrent use of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS). The two analytical methods were employed during growth of metal, semiconductor and superconductor thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Surface sensitivity of the REELS spectrometer was found to be less than 1 nm for 20 KeV electrons incident at a 2 degree angle to an atomically flat film surface, agreeing with the standard electron escape depth data when adjusted incident angle. Film surface topography was found to strongly influence the REELS spectra and this was correlated with in situ RHEED patterns and ex situ analysis by comparison with atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was observed in all the experimental results that from very smooth films the plasmon peak maxima did not fall at the predicted surface plasmon values but at slightly higher energies, even for nearly atomically flat films. This suggested the REELS plasmon loss spectra are always a combination of surface and bulk plasmon losses. The resulting summation of these two types of losses shifted the peak to below the bulk plasmon value but held its minimum to a higher energy than the pure surface plasmon value. Curve fitting supported this conclusion.

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Date Created
2012

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Precision measurement of the radiative decay mode of the free neutron

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The theory of quantum electrodynamics predicts that beta decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and anti-neutrino should be accompanied by a continuous spectrum of photons. A recent experiment, RDK I, reported the first detection of radiative decay photons

The theory of quantum electrodynamics predicts that beta decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and anti-neutrino should be accompanied by a continuous spectrum of photons. A recent experiment, RDK I, reported the first detection of radiative decay photons from neutron beta decay with a branching ratio of (3.09 ± 0.32) × 10-3 in the energy range of 15 keV to 340 keV. This was achieved by prompt coincident detection of an electron and photon, in delayed coincidence with a proton. The photons were detected by using a single bar of bismuth germanate scintillating crystal coupled to an avalanche photodiode. This thesis deals with the follow-up experiment, RDK II, to measure the branching ratio at the level of approximately 1% and the energy spectrum at the level of a few percent. The most significant improvement of RDK II is the use of a photon detector with about an order of magnitude greater solid angle coverage than RDK I. In addition, the detectable energy range has been extended down to approximately 250 eV and up to the endpoint energy of 782 keV. This dissertation presents an overview of the apparatus, development of a new data analysis technique for radiative decay, and results for the ratio of electron-proton-photon coincident Repg to electron-proton coincident Rep events.

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2012

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Driven-Dissipative Dynamics of the Hubbard Model Attached to a Fermionic Bath

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In this project, we created a code that was able to simulate the dynamics of a three site Hubbard model ring connected to an infinite dissipative bath and driven by an electric field. We utilized the master equation approach, which

In this project, we created a code that was able to simulate the dynamics of a three site Hubbard model ring connected to an infinite dissipative bath and driven by an electric field. We utilized the master equation approach, which will one day be able to be implemented efficiently on a quantum computer. For now we used classical computing to model one of the simplest nontrivial driven dissipative systems. This will serve as a verification of the master equation method and a baseline to test against when we are able to implement it on a quantum computer. For this report, we will mainly focus on classifying the DC component of the current around our ring. We notice several expected characteristics of this DC current including an inverse square tail at large values of the electric field and a linear response region at small values of the electric field.

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2020-05

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First principles exploration of crystal structures and physical properties of silicon hydrides KSiH₃ and K₂SiH₆, alkali and alkaline earth metal carbides, and II-V semiconductors ZnSb and ZnAs

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This dissertation is focused on material property exploration and analysis using computational quantum mechanics methods. Theoretical calculations were performed on the recently discovered hexahydride materials A2SiH6 (A=Rb, K) to calculate the lattice dynamics of the systems in order to check

This dissertation is focused on material property exploration and analysis using computational quantum mechanics methods. Theoretical calculations were performed on the recently discovered hexahydride materials A2SiH6 (A=Rb, K) to calculate the lattice dynamics of the systems in order to check for structural stability, verify the experimental Raman and infrared spectrospcopy results, and obtain the theoretical free energies of formation. The electronic structure of the systems was calculated and the bonding and ionic properties of the systems were analyzed. The novel hexahydrides were compared to the important hydrogen storage material KSiH3. This showed that the hypervalent nature of the SiH62- ions reduced the Si-H bonding strength considerably. These hydrogen rich compounds could have promising energy applications as they link to alternative hydrogen fuel technology. The carbide systems Li-C (A=Li,Ca,Mg) were studied using \emph{ab initio} and evolutionary algorithms at high pressures. At ambient pressure Li2C2 and CaC2 are known to contain C22- dumbbell anions and CaC2 is polymorphic. At elevated pressure both CaC2 and Li2C2 display polymorphism. At ambient pressure the Mg-C system contains several experimentally known phases, however, all known phases are shown to be metastable with respect to the pure elements Mg and C. First principle investigation of the configurational space of these compounds via evolutionary algorithms results in a variety of metastable and unique structures. The binary compounds ZnSb and ZnAs are II-V electron-poor semiconductors with interesting thermoelectric properties. They contain rhomboid rings composed of Zn2Sb2 (Zn2As2) with multi-centered covalent bonds which are in turn covalently bonded to other rings via two-centered, two-electron bonds. Ionicity was explored via Bader charge analysis and it appears that the low ionicity that these materials display is a necessary condition of their multicentered bonding. Both compounds were found to have narrow, indirect band gaps with multi-valley valence and conduction bands; which are important characteristics for high thermopower in thermoelectric materials. Future work is needed to analyze the lattice properties of the II-V CdSb-type systems, especially in order to find the origin of the extremely low thermal conductivity that these systems display.

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Date Created
2013

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Electronic and optical properties of Si-Ge-Sn alloys

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In this thesis a new method based on the Tight-Binding Linear Muffin Tin Orbital (TB-LMTO) formalism and the Quasiparticle Self-consistent GW (QSGW) approximation is proposed. The method is capable of generating accurate electronic bands structure of large supercells necessary to

In this thesis a new method based on the Tight-Binding Linear Muffin Tin Orbital (TB-LMTO) formalism and the Quasiparticle Self-consistent GW (QSGW) approximation is proposed. The method is capable of generating accurate electronic bands structure of large supercells necessary to model alloys structures. The strategy consist in building simple and small hamiltonian from linear Muffin-tin-orbitals (LMTO). Parameters in this hamiltonian are then used to fit the difference in QSGW self-energies and LDA exchange-correlation potentials. The parameter are assumed to transfer to new environments --- a procedure we check carefully by comparing our predicted band to QSGW bands for small supercells. The method possess both the accuracy of the QSGW approximation, (which is the most reliable way to determine energy bands accurately, and yet too expensive for the large supercells required here), and the efficiency of the TB-LMTO method. The accurate and highly efficient hamiltonian is used to predict the electronic and optical transitions of Si1-xGex alloys and SnxSiyGe1-x-y alloys. The goal is to engineer direct band gap material compatible with the silicon technology. The results obtained are compared to available experimental data.

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Date Created
2011

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Structural characterization of II-VI and III-V compound semiconductor heterostructures and superlattices

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The research described in this dissertation has involved the use of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) to characterize the structural properties of II-VI and III-V compound semiconductor heterostructures and superlattices. The microstructure of thick ZnTe epilayers (~2.4 µm) grown by molecular

The research described in this dissertation has involved the use of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) to characterize the structural properties of II-VI and III-V compound semiconductor heterostructures and superlattices. The microstructure of thick ZnTe epilayers (~2.4 µm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) under virtually identical conditions on GaSb, InAs, InP and GaAs (100) substrates were compared using TEM. High-resolution electron micrographs revealed a highly coherent interface for the ZnTe/GaSb sample, and showed extensive areas with well-separated interfacial misfit dislocations for the ZnTe/InAs sample. Lomer edge dislocations and 60o dislocations were commonly observed at the interfaces of the ZnTe/InP and ZnTe/GaAs samples. The amount of residual strain at the interfaces was estimated to be 0.01% for the ZnTe/InP sample and -0.09% for the ZnTe/GaAs sample. Strong PL spectra for all ZnTe samples were observed from 80 to 300 K. High quality GaSb grown by MBE on ZnTe/GaSb (001) virtual substrates with a temperature ramp at the beginning of the GaSb growth has been demonstrated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed clear Pendellösung thickness fringes from both GaSb and ZnTe epilayers. Cross-section TEM images showed excellent crystallinity and smooth morphology for both ZnTe/GaSb and GaSb/ZnTe interfaces. Plan-view TEM image revealed the presence of Lomer dislocations at the interfaces and threading dislocations in the top GaSb layer. The defect density was estimated to be ~1 x107/cm2. The PL spectra showed improved optical properties when using the GaSb transition layer grown on ZnTe with a temperature ramp. The structural properties of strain-balanced InAs/InAs1-xSbx SLs grown on GaSb (001) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and MBE, have been studied using XRD and TEM. Excellent structural quality of the InAs/InAs1-xSbx SLs grown by MOCVD has been demonstrated. Well-defined ordered-alloy structures within individual InAs1-xSbx layers were observed for samples grown by modulated MBE. However, the ordering disappeared when defects propagating through the SL layers appeared during growth. For samples grown by conventional MBE, high-resolution images revealed that interfaces for InAs1-xSbx grown on InAs layers were sharper than for InAs grown on InAs1-xSbx layers, most likely due to a Sb surfactant segregation effect.

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Date Created
2012

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Modeling mechanisms of water affinity and condensation on Si-based surfaces via experiments and applications

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Water affinity and condensation on Si-based surfaces is investigated to address the problem of fogging on silicone intraocular lenses (IOL) during cataract surgery, using Si(100), silica (SiO2) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone (SiOC2H6)n. Condensation is described by two step nucleation and

Water affinity and condensation on Si-based surfaces is investigated to address the problem of fogging on silicone intraocular lenses (IOL) during cataract surgery, using Si(100), silica (SiO2) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone (SiOC2H6)n. Condensation is described by two step nucleation and growth where roughness controls heterogeneous nucleation of droplets followed by Ostwald ripening. Wetting on hydrophilic surfaces consists of continuous aqueous films while hydrophobic surfaces exhibit fogging with discrete droplets. Si-based surfaces with wavelength above 200 nm exhibit fogging during condensation. Below 200 nm, surfaces are found to wet during condensation. Water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified via the surface free energy (SFE) using Sessile drop contact angle analysis, the Young-Dupré equation, and Van Oss theory. Topography is analyzed using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM). Polymer adsorption and ion beam modification of materials (IBMM) can modify surface topography, composition, and SFE, and alter water affinity of the Si-based surfaces we studied. Wet adsorption of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) C32H60O19 with areal densities ranging from 1018 atom/cm2 to 1019 atom/cm2 characterized via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), allows for the substrate to adopt the topography of the HPMC film and its hydrophilic properties. The HPMC surface composition maintains a bulk stoichiometric ratio as confirmed by 4.265 MeV 12C(α, α)12C and 3.045 MeV 16O(α, α)16O, and 2.8 MeV He++ elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen. Both PIXE and RBS methods give comparable areal density results of polymer films on Si(100), silica, and PDMS silicone substrates. The SFE and topography of PDMS silicone polymers used for IOLs can also be modified by IBMM. IBMM of HPMC cellulose occurs during IBA as well. Damage curves and ERD are shown to characterize surface desorption accurately during IBMM so that ion beam damage can be accounted for during analysis of polymer areal density and composition. IBMM of Si(100)-SiO2 ordered interfaces also induces changes of SFE, as ions disorder surface atoms. The SFE converges for all surfaces, hydrophobic and hydrophilic, as ions alter electrochemical properties of the surface via atomic and electronic displacements.

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Date Created
2011