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Contributing to a meta-analysis on the effects of acute physical exercise on the executive functions of preadolescent children, adolescents and adults

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The purpose of this study, originally, was to contribute to the completion of a meta-analysis conducted by Mara Wierstra from the University of Virginia. Wierstra had requested individual participant data from two separate studies conducted in our lab: "Acute bouts

The purpose of this study, originally, was to contribute to the completion of a meta-analysis conducted by Mara Wierstra from the University of Virginia. Wierstra had requested individual participant data from two separate studies conducted in our lab: "Acute bouts of assisted cycling improves cognitive and upper extremity movement functions in adolescents with Down syndrome" and "Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) improves inhibition in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder." From the data requested, the participants were required to complete three separate tests (i.e., Tower of London, Trail Making Task and the Stroop Test). After compiling the data and sending it to her, we decided to conduct a small meta-analysis of our own, drawing connecting conclusions from the data from the two studies. We concluded that observationally our data suggest an advantage for ACT over voluntary cycling and no cycling across two separate populations (i.e., Autism Spectrum Disorder and Down syndrome), and across different measures of executive function (i.e., Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, and Tower of London). The data suggest that the ACT interventions may promote the upregulation of neurotropic factors leading to neurogenesis in the prefrontal cortex of the brain.

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Date Created
2016-12

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Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) in Older Adults with Down syndrome and its effect on mental health.

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Previous research has found improvements in motor and cognitive measures following Assisted Cycle Therapy (AC) in adolescence with Down syndrome (DS). Our study investigated whether we would find improvements in mental health in older adults with DS as measured from

Previous research has found improvements in motor and cognitive measures following Assisted Cycle Therapy (AC) in adolescence with Down syndrome (DS). Our study investigated whether we would find improvements in mental health in older adults with DS as measured from the Adapted Behavior Dementia Questionnaire (ABDQ), Physical Activity Self Efficacy Scales (PACES), Children's Depressive inventory, which are early indicators of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in persons with Down syndrome. This study consisted of seven participants with Down syndrome between the ages of 31 and 54, inclusive, that cycled for 30 minutes 3 x/week for eight weeks either at their voluntary cycling rate (VC) or approximately 35% faster with the help of a mechanical motor (ACT). Our results were consistent with our prediction that self efficacy improved following ACT, but not VC. However, our results were not consistent with our prediction that dementia and depression were improved following ACT more than VC. These results were interpreted with respect to the effects of exercise in older adults with DS. Future research should focus on recruiting more participants, especially those with deficits in mental health.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Does assisted cycle therapy influence activities of daily living in older adults with Down syndrome?

Description

The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between Assisted Cycle Therapy, leisure time activity levels, fine motor control, and grip force in older adults with Down syndrome (DS), all of which affect activities of daily living (ADL)

The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between Assisted Cycle Therapy, leisure time activity levels, fine motor control, and grip force in older adults with Down syndrome (DS), all of which affect activities of daily living (ADL) and therefore quality of life. This is relevant because this particular group is at risk for developing early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), which presents itself uniquely in this population. The parent or guardian of six participants with DS completed Godin's Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and the participants themselves completed Purdue Pegboard and grip force assessments before and after an 8-week exercise intervention. The results were inconsistent with past research, with no change being seen in fine motor control or grip force and a decrease being seen in leisure activity. These findings are indicative of the importance of the effect of fatigue on leisure activity as well as maintaining elevated heart rate throughout exercise interventions.

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Date Created
2015-05