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Does assisted cycle therapy influence activities of daily living in older adults with Down syndrome?

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The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between Assisted Cycle Therapy, leisure time activity levels, fine motor control, and grip force in older adults with Down syndrome (DS), all of which affect activities of daily living (ADL)

The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between Assisted Cycle Therapy, leisure time activity levels, fine motor control, and grip force in older adults with Down syndrome (DS), all of which affect activities of daily living (ADL) and therefore quality of life. This is relevant because this particular group is at risk for developing early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), which presents itself uniquely in this population. The parent or guardian of six participants with DS completed Godin's Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and the participants themselves completed Purdue Pegboard and grip force assessments before and after an 8-week exercise intervention. The results were inconsistent with past research, with no change being seen in fine motor control or grip force and a decrease being seen in leisure activity. These findings are indicative of the importance of the effect of fatigue on leisure activity as well as maintaining elevated heart rate throughout exercise interventions.

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Date Created
2015-05

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The Effect of Exercise Therapy on Cognitive Function in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

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This study examines the effect of exercise therapy on a stationary bike on cognitive function, specifically inhibition and set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome. 44 participants were randomly divided between the voluntary cycling therapy group (VCT) (i.e., self-selected cadence), assisted

This study examines the effect of exercise therapy on a stationary bike on cognitive function, specifically inhibition and set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome. 44 participants were randomly divided between the voluntary cycling therapy group (VCT) (i.e., self-selected cadence), assisted cycling therapy group (ACT) (i.e., 30% faster than self-selected cadence accomplished by a motor), and a control group (NC) in which the participants did not undergo any exercise therapy. Both cycling groups rode a stationary bicycle, for 30 minutes, three times a week, for eight-weeks. At the beginning (i.e., pretest) and end (i.e., posttest) of the eight-week session the participants completed tasks to evaluate their cognitive function. They completed three trials of the card sort test (i.e., set-switching) and three trials of the knock-tap test (i.e, inhibition) before and after eight-weeks of cycling therapy. The scores of these tests were analyzed using one-way ANOVA between groups and paired samples t-tests. The results showed that after eight-weeks of cycling therapy the participants in the VCT group performed worse in the knock-tap test, but improved in two trials of the card sort test. The results also showed that the participants in the ACT group performed worse after eight-weeks of exercise therapy in one trial of the card sort test. No significant changes were seen for the control group. Due to the fact that on average the participants in the VCT group cycled with a higher heart rate, our results suggest exercise that significantly elevates heart rate can improve cognitive function, specifically set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) Improves Depression in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

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The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on depression in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Twelve participants randomly completed one of two exercise interventions. The interventions were: 1) Voluntary Cycling (VC), in

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on depression in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Twelve participants randomly completed one of two exercise interventions. The interventions were: 1) Voluntary Cycling (VC), in which participants cycled at their self-selected pedaling rate 2) Assisted Cycling (AC), in which the participants' voluntary pedaling rates were augmented with a motor to ensure the maintenance of 80 rpms. In each intervention, the participant completed three cycling sessions each week for a total of eight weeks. Depression scores did decrease or improved after both AC and VC, but not significantly. There was a greater mean improvement for participants in the AC group than VC when analyzing total score and t-score. Future research will include a greater sample size and control group to reach significant results as well as try and reveal the mechanisms involved in these mental health improvements found after an acute bout of assisted cycling in adolescents with DS.

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Created

Date Created
2013-12

Fitzgerald_G_Spring_2022.pdf

Description

Statistics show that the termination rates for fetuses with Down syndrome are substantially higher compared to the general population. Perhaps pregnant women are led to believe that this is the best option for them. The information that leads them to

Statistics show that the termination rates for fetuses with Down syndrome are substantially higher compared to the general population. Perhaps pregnant women are led to believe that this is the best option for them. The information that leads them to this conclusion could be one of the leading factors for the high termination rates. In an attempt to understand the reasons behind the high termination rates the following question must be addressed: “What information is available to pregnant women that may influence their decision to terminate or not terminate fetuses with Trisomy 21?” In order to answer this question I completed a comprehensive literature review of the information available to pregnant women in the United States after they find out there fetus has Trisomy 21. The results showed that many sources publish information that is straightforward, factual, and attempts to make sure that pregnant women are fully informed on the reality of life with a child with Down syndrome. However, there are also many sources that publish information that is biased and attempts to influence a woman’s decision of whether to keep or abort her fetus with Trisomy 21. The results from this study suggest that the message conveyed from a given article relies heavily on who is doing the writing, the type of article it is, and were it is published. This provides women with a confusing array of different ideas, as opposed to offering them objective facts and consistent information. When a pregnant woman is told that her fetus is positive for the Trisomy 21 disorder and will be born with Down syndrome, it can be a very scary and emotional time. Women in this situation deserve easy access the correct information in order to help them make an informed decision based on their own choice and not the opinion of someone else.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

Thesis Presentation.pdf

Description

Statistics show that the termination rates for fetuses with Down syndrome are substantially higher compared to the general population. Perhaps pregnant women are led to believe that this is the best option for them. The information that leads them to

Statistics show that the termination rates for fetuses with Down syndrome are substantially higher compared to the general population. Perhaps pregnant women are led to believe that this is the best option for them. The information that leads them to this conclusion could be one of the leading factors for the high termination rates. In an attempt to understand the reasons behind the high termination rates the following question must be addressed: “What information is available to pregnant women that may influence their decision to terminate or not terminate fetuses with Trisomy 21?” In order to answer this question I completed a comprehensive literature review of the information available to pregnant women in the United States after they find out there fetus has Trisomy 21. The results showed that many sources publish information that is straightforward, factual, and attempts to make sure that pregnant women are fully informed on the reality of life with a child with Down syndrome. However, there are also many sources that publish information that is biased and attempts to influence a woman’s decision of whether to keep or abort her fetus with Trisomy 21. The results from this study suggest that the message conveyed from a given article relies heavily on who is doing the writing, the type of article it is, and were it is published. This provides women with a confusing array of different ideas, as opposed to offering them objective facts and consistent information. When a pregnant woman is told that her fetus is positive for the Trisomy 21 disorder and will be born with Down syndrome, it can be a very scary and emotional time. Women in this situation deserve easy access the correct information in order to help them make an informed decision based on their own choice and not the opinion of someone else.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

A Review of the Information Available to Pregnant Women That may Influence Their Decision to Terminate or not Terminate Fetuses With Trisomy 21

Description

Statistics show that the termination rates for fetuses with Down syndrome are substantially higher compared to the general population. Perhaps pregnant women are led to believe that this is the best option for them. The information that leads them to

Statistics show that the termination rates for fetuses with Down syndrome are substantially higher compared to the general population. Perhaps pregnant women are led to believe that this is the best option for them. The information that leads them to this conclusion could be one of the leading factors for the high termination rates. In an attempt to understand the reasons behind the high termination rates the following question must be addressed: “What information is available to pregnant women that may influence their decision to terminate or not terminate fetuses with Trisomy 21?” In order to answer this question I completed a comprehensive literature review of the information available to pregnant women in the United States after they find out there fetus has Trisomy 21. The results showed that many sources publish information that is straightforward, factual, and attempts to make sure that pregnant women are fully informed on the reality of life with a child with Down syndrome. However, there are also many sources that publish information that is biased and attempts to influence a woman’s decision of whether to keep or abort her fetus with Trisomy 21. The results from this study suggest that the message conveyed from a given article relies heavily on who is doing the writing, the type of article it is, and were it is published. This provides women with a confusing array of different ideas, as opposed to offering them objective facts and consistent information. When a pregnant woman is told that her fetus is positive for the Trisomy 21 disorder and will be born with Down syndrome, it can be a very scary and emotional time. Women in this situation deserve easy access the correct information in order to help them make an informed decision based on their own choice and not the opinion of someone else.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05