Matching Items (13)

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Developing an Independent Video Game to Diversify University Recruitment

Description

University Devils is a Founders Lab Thesis group looking to find a way for post-secondary institutions to increase the number of and diversity of incoming applications through the utilization of

University Devils is a Founders Lab Thesis group looking to find a way for post-secondary institutions to increase the number of and diversity of incoming applications through the utilization of gaming and gaming approaches in the recruitment process while staying low-cost. This propelling question guided the group through their work. The team’s work primarily focused on recruitment efforts at Arizona State University, but the concept can be modified and applied at other post-secondary institutions. The initial research showed that Arizona State University’s recruitment focused on visiting the high schools of prospective students and providing campus tours to interested students. A proposed alternative solution to aid in recruitment efforts through the utilization of gaming was to create an online multiplayer game that prospective students could play from their own homes. The basic premise of the game is that one player is selected to be “the Professor” while the other players are part of “the Students.” To complete the game, the Students must complete a set of tasks while the Professor applies various obstacles to prevent the Students from winning. When a Student completes their objectives, they win and the game ends. The game was created using Unity. The group has completed a proof-of-concept of the proposed game and worked to advertise and market the game to students via social media. The team’s efforts have gained traction, and the group continues to work to gain traction and bring the idea to more prospective students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Developing an Independent Video Game to Diversify University Recruitment

Description

University Devils is a Founders Lab Thesis group looking to find a way for post-secondary institutions to increase the number of and diversity of incoming applications through the utilization of

University Devils is a Founders Lab Thesis group looking to find a way for post-secondary institutions to increase the number of and diversity of incoming applications through the utilization of gaming and gaming approaches in the recruitment process while staying low-cost. This propelling question guided the group through their work. The team’s work primarily focused on recruitment efforts at Arizona State University, but the concept can be modified and applied at other post-secondary institutions. The initial research showed that Arizona State University’s recruitment focused on visiting the high schools of prospective students and providing campus tours to interested students. A proposed alternative solution to aid in recruitment efforts through the utilization of gaming was to create an online multiplayer game that prospective students could play from their own homes. The basic premise of the game is that one player is selected to be “the Professor” while the other players are part of “the Students.” To complete the game, The Students must complete a set of tasks while the Professor applies various obstacles to prevent the Students from winning. When a Student completes their objectives, they win and the game ends. The game was created using Unity. The group has completed a proof-of-concept of the proposed game and worked to advertise and market the game to students via social media. The team’s efforts have gained traction and the group continues to work to gain traction and bring the idea to more prospective students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Accessibility Services Feedback and Recommendations: The Experience of a Sun Devil at ASU

Description

This paper argues that improved student disability services at universities can limit the amount of stress that burdens students with disabilities in order to, improve their mood and create greater

This paper argues that improved student disability services at universities can limit the amount of stress that burdens students with disabilities in order to, improve their mood and create greater possibilities for successful student outcomes. This study begins by reviewing the progress that has been made in the 20th and 21st centuries in terms of heightened awareness and legislation that benefit people with disabilities. In addition, it applauds the efforts made so far at the Arizona State University Polytechnic and Tempe campuses, but also seeks to highlight some concerns that might become a focus of future policymaking endeavors. The applause and concerns are based on the experience of the author with ASU’s Disability Resource Center (DRC), now rebranded as the Student Accessibility and Inclusive Learning Services (SAILS). The author’s lens of physical/mobility limitations yields insight into the accessibility of the unique programs
offered by ASU’s Study Abroad Office as well as the daily transportation efforts of the DRC/SAILS’s DART service. The particular experiences discussed include a Barrett Global Intensive Experience trip to Ireland, the use of the on-campus DART transportation service at Polytechnic and Tempe, handicap parking and elevator placement at Polytechnic, the intercampus shuttle, and the future of Zoom as a means of providing accessibility to students with disabilities. This paper will make recommendations to the appropriate parties for possible changes to policy and/or procedure and alterations to the current state of tangible obstacles.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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The Two Cultures Debate and the New American University

Description

Since the days of Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum, the intellectual community has been divided in two. This division has continued into the present day, most notably evidenced by the

Since the days of Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum, the intellectual community has been divided in two. This division has continued into the present day, most notably evidenced by the dichotomy between science and arts majors. There has been much debate over the last two centuries regarding how to bridge this divide, and whether or not doing so is necessary. Scholars like C. P. Snow have argued that interdisciplinary education is humanity’s only hope for confronting its current and future problems, while scholars like F.R. Leavis believe calls to restructure education are an oversimplification of a more complex problem. With its emphasis on global and local outreach, interdisciplinary education, and use-inspired research, the New American University model currently in use by Arizona State University is a literal attempt at bridging this divide. Schools like the College of Integrated Sciences and Arts have created an environment that encourages interdisciplinary collaboration. President Crow attributes this progress to what he calls “the design approach.” Unlike a rigid blueprint, the design approach instead looks at each problem in isolation, allowing for a unique solution to be tailor-made to fit each scenario. Despite the initial successes of the New American University model, however, it is still important to remain observant and critical of its practices into the future, as too much of an emphasis on interdisciplinarity could have the opposite of its intended effect, and potentially drive students who wish to specialize away from traditional universities altogether.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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First year students' meal plans and dining hall use: differences by food insecurity, and similarities among roommates

Description

Background In the United States (US), first-year university students typically live on campus and purchase a meal plan. In general, meal plans allow the student a set number of meals

Background In the United States (US), first-year university students typically live on campus and purchase a meal plan. In general, meal plans allow the student a set number of meals per week or semester, or unlimited meals. Understanding how students’ use their meal plan, and barriers and facilitators to meal plan use, may help decrease nutrition-related issues.

Methods First-year students’ meal plan and residence information was provided by a large, public, southwestern university for the 2015-2016 academic year. A subset of students (n=619) self-reported their food security status. Logistic generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to determine if meal plan purchase and use were associated with food insecurity. Linear GEEs were used to examine several potential reasons for lower meal plan use. Logistic and Linear GEEs were used to determine similarities in meal plan purchase and use for a total of 599 roommate pairs (n=1186 students), and 557 floormates.

Results Students did not use all of the meals available to them; 7% of students did not use their meal plan for an entire month. After controlling for socioeconomic factors, compared to students on unlimited meal plans, students on the cheapest meal plan were more likely to report food insecurity (OR=2.2, 95% CI=1.2, 4.1). In Fall, 26% of students on unlimited meal plans reported food insecurity. Students on the 180 meals/semester meal plan who used fewer meals were more likely to report food insecurity (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.8, 1.0); after gender stratification this was only evident for males. Students’ meal plan use was lower if the student worked a job (β=-1.3, 95% CI=-2.3, -0.3) and higher when their roommate used their meal plan frequently (β=0.09, 99% CI=0.04, 0.14). Roommates on the same meal plan (OR=1.56, 99% CI=1.28, 1.89) were more likely to use their meals together.

Discussion This study suggests that determining why students are not using their meal plan may be key to minimizing the prevalence of food insecurity on college campuses, and that strategic roommate assignments may result in students’ using their meal plan more frequently. Students’ meal plan information provides objective insights into students’ university transition.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Research on Talent Cultivation in China 's Universities Based on Supply - Demand Relation of Labor Market

Description

University graduates play a significant role in the labor market of China. Universities continuously supply senior talents and provide a strong guarantee to the country’s development. However, with the enlargement

University graduates play a significant role in the labor market of China. Universities continuously supply senior talents and provide a strong guarantee to the country’s development. However, with the enlargement of the enrollment scale, more and more graduates become unemployed or forced to be employed. Most literatures mainly focus on the unemployed phenomenon or reasons, but had neglected the relationship among the employment, universities and the labor market. This assay is trying to using the supply and demand theory of classical economics to analyze the training direction and model of university from the perspective of the supply and demand of labor market. This assay proposes that universities have to integrate with the demand of the labor market so that to cultivate the talents to meet the social needs.

Firstly, the essay analyzes the relationship between the universities education and the supply and demand labor market by using the view of labor economics, and shows the mainly phenomenon and features of supply-demand imbalance. And then, the writer considered that universities talent cultivation development of China has gone through “absolute shortage”, “relative shortage” and “structural unbalanced” three stages. Thirdly, the survey results confirmed that the talent cultivation in universities does not match the demand of the labor market. On one other hand, over educated is a common phenomenon in the academic education. On the other hand, the graduates are lack of education skills training. Fourthly, the essay analyzes the reasons which lead to the unbalance. The unbalance is not only affected by the macro factors, but also by the micro factors. Fifthly, build up the interaction system model “UPT-LM” for the universities talent cultivation and the labor market, and separately building up the macro interaction system and the micro interaction system to analyze the balance of supply and demand. Based on this, it should strengthen the interaction on the feedback mechanism. At last, strengthening the connection of universities talent cultivation and labor market is a systematic program which needs the corporation from the government, the universities and the labor market.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Rates of depression, anxiety, and stress in collegiate aviators

Description

The purpose of this research was to determine if students who are enrolled in a professional flight program exhibit significantly higher rates of depression, stress, and anxiety. This study compared

The purpose of this research was to determine if students who are enrolled in a professional flight program exhibit significantly higher rates of depression, stress, and anxiety. This study compared professional flight students to non-professional flight students to determine whether professional flight students have higher rates of depression and anxiety. In addition, this study sought to determine if there were higher depression, anxiety, and stress levels in upperclassmen (juniors and seniors) than in lowerclassmen (freshman and sophomore). Finally, upperclassmen and underclassmen within professional flight programs were compared to test if upperclassmen professional flight students exhibit higher rates for depression, anxiety and stress. These groups were compared to each other by using a survey that measures depression, anxiety, and stress. There were no statistically significant results. No singular group is more or less prone to depression, anxiety, or stress.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Good Writing" in increasingly internationalized U.S. universities: how instructors evaluate different written varieties of English

Description

This study investigates how university instructors from various disciplines at a large, comprehensive university in the United States evaluate different varieties of English from countries considered "outer circle" (OC) countries,

This study investigates how university instructors from various disciplines at a large, comprehensive university in the United States evaluate different varieties of English from countries considered "outer circle" (OC) countries, formerly colonized countries where English has been transplanted and is now used unofficially and officially to varying degrees. The study was designed to address two gaps in the research: (1) how instructors in increasingly internationalized U.S. universities evaluate different written varieties of English, since many international students may be writing in an L1 other than American English, and (2) how instructors' first language and/or disciplinary backgrounds appear to affect their evaluations. Through a comparison of rankings and qualitative analysis of interview data, the study examines whether the participating instructors value the same features and characteristics in writing, such as text and organization features, found in American English and varieties of OC written English. In addition, it examines whether one's first or native language or one's disciplinary training affects the perception and evaluation of these particular varieties of English. This study showed that what is currently valued and expected by instructors from various disciplines in U.S. universities is what may be identified as an "American" style of writing; participants expected an organization providing a clear purpose up front, including paragraphs of a certain length, and containing sentences perceived as more direct and succinct. In addition, given the overall agreement on the element of good writing demonstrated in how composition and content area professors ranked the writing samples, my study suggests that what is being taught in composition is preparing student for the writing expected in content area classes. Last, my findings add to World Englishes (WE) research by adding a writing component to WE attitudinal research studies, which have previously focused on oral production. Almost equal numbers of Native and Non-Native English Speakers (NESs and NNESs) participated, and the NNESs appeared more tolerant of different varieties, unlike the preference for inner circle norms noted in previous studies. This study, therefore, has implications for writing research and instruction at U.S. colleges and universities, as well as informing the field of World Englishes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The power of instructor-student and peer rapport in post-secondary student achievement

Description

This paper addresses a local problem of practice at Arizona State University regarding the support for potentially underprepared students. The overarching goal of this study was to better understand the

This paper addresses a local problem of practice at Arizona State University regarding the support for potentially underprepared students. The overarching goal of this study was to better understand the role rapport plays in student achievement. This study examines how the LEAD Project (Learn, Explore, Advance, Design), in particular student relationships with instructors and their peers, may or may not influence student achievement. LEAD students complete three courses as a group – Introduction to Human Communication (COM 100), Critical Reading and Thinking (UNI 110), and The LEAD Project (ASU 150). The innovation was designed to give students the opportunity to build relationships with their instructors and with each other, so class sizes are limited to 40 students. Additionally, instructors work together outside of class to develop curriculum, instructional plans, and how to best support individual students.

Guiding literature for this study included Self-Determination Theory (SDT) as well as related studies (Deci & Flaste, 1995). This theory describes human motivation as a factor of the extent to which one feels autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Though relevant in many contexts, past researchers used SDT as a tool for understanding students’ motivation to learn (Black & Deci, 2000; Freiberger, Steinmayr, & Spinath, 2012; Reeve & Jang, 2006).

The study used a concurrent mixed-method action research design including interviews, questionnaires, and institutional data. Over 400 first-year students participated in the study. Students shared their perceptions of their rapport with their instructors and peers, and their perceived learning in each of the three LEAD courses.

Data were analyzed using correlation and linear regression approaches. Significant relations occurred between many instructor-student rapport scales, peer rapport, perceived learning, and course grades. Additionally, instructor-student rapport scales significantly predicted perceived learning.

Qualitative and quantitative findings were aligned with each other, and were consistent with previous studies. This study advances the body of knowledge about instructor-student rapport by extending the findings around its role in student achievement. Results also suggested the need to further explore the role of peer rapport and its influence on student achievement. Results from the study show instructor-student rapport was mediators of student achievement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Activating strengths during the transition from community college to university: a phenomenological study of vulnerable transfer students

Description

The transition experience for students who are transferring from community college to university can be an overwhelming experience for any typical student, but can be even greater for students with

The transition experience for students who are transferring from community college to university can be an overwhelming experience for any typical student, but can be even greater for students with vulnerable backgrounds. This phenomenological action research study followed the five-month community college to the university transition experience of five students in a scholarship program. The students participated in a three-part intervention in support of their transition experience. Three theoretical perspectives framed the study: community cultural wealth, transition theory, and transfer student capital. This framework enabled me to first identify the strengths the students possessed, despite their vulnerable backgrounds, through participation in individual interviews. The students then participated in pre- and post-focus groups and completed pre- and post-questionnaires. Through these, they identified which transition coping skills were their strongest and which transfer capital they possessed from their community college experience. They also shared how they applied those prior learned skills and capital at the university. This study revealed how these students utilized their strengths at moments when they lacked certain coping skills and transfer capital during their transition experience. One particular strength was how the students accessed the resources of the scholarship program at the center of this study to help them with their sense of the ability to succeed at the university.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019