Matching Items (6)

HPV Vaccine Administration in Community Pharmacies

Description

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine can help prevent numerous cancers and genital warts. Traditionally, pediatricians and family medicine providers administer the vaccine. However, pharmacists can also vaccinate against HPV. The

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine can help prevent numerous cancers and genital warts. Traditionally, pediatricians and family medicine providers administer the vaccine. However, pharmacists can also vaccinate against HPV. The objective for this study is to assess Arizona pharmacists’ behaviors and influences in relation to administering the HPV vaccine. We administered a survey to Arizona pharmacists at a statewide virtual conference. The key points that are assessed: pharmacists’ behaviors, intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral in relation to the human papillomavirus vaccination. Looking at the measures, the leading outcomes of the study involved the HPV vaccination behavior and intentions to administer the vaccine. Secondary outcomes related more to the Theory of Planned Behavior constructs, which ended up being stronger with predictions of HPV vaccine administration intentions and behavior. Our results show that most of pharmacists held very positive attitudes (on a Likert Scale of 1-5)towards the HPV vaccine. It looked like attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm combined had a big influence on HPV vaccination intentions; however, the strongest predictor came down to the subjective norms, in administering the vaccine. Pharmacists believed strongly with implementing the HPV vaccine, and want to do so in the near future. In conclusion, the overall point of the study is that there should be a need in increasing pharmacy professionals’ subjective norms to vaccinate against the HPV in order to accelerate pharmacy-based HPV immunizations. Implementing human papillomavirus vaccine promotions in the near future could help engage leadership in pharmacy, and further encourage pharmacists’ awareness to administer the vaccine. Additionally, raising pharmacists’ awareness to administer the vaccine among adolescents could add facilitation in increasing human papillomavirus rates.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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The effect of change facilitation coaching using the concerns-based adoption model with an urban elementary school teacher-leadership team

Description

Public demands for accountability and educational change are at an all-time high. No Child Left Behind set the stage for public accountability of educators and the recently created Race to

Public demands for accountability and educational change are at an all-time high. No Child Left Behind set the stage for public accountability of educators and the recently created Race to the Top grant raised the stakes of public school accountability even more with the creation of national standards and assessments as well as public accountability of individual teacher performance based on student test scores. This high-stakes context has placed pressure on local schools to change their instructional practices rapidly to ensure students are learning what they need to in order to perform well on looming Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) exams. The purpose of this mixed methods action research study was to explore a shared leadership model and discover the impact of a change facilitation team using the Concerns Based Adoption Model tools on the speed and quality of innovation diffusion at a Title One elementary school. The nine-member change facilitation team received support for 20 weeks in the form of professional development and ongoing team coaching as a means to empower teacher-leaders to more effectively take on the challenges of change. Eight of those members participated in this research. This approach draws on the research on change, learning organizations, and coaching. Quantitative results from the Change Facilitator Stages of Concern Questionnaire were triangulated with qualitative data from interviews, field notes, and Innovation Configuration Maps. Results show the impact on instructional innovation when teacher-leadership is leveraged to support change. Further, there is an important role for change coaches when leading change initiatives. Implications from this study can be used to support other site leaders grappling with instructional innovation and calls for additional research.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Developing a web-based hiring resource at a state medical college

Description

This study uses a sequential, mixed method, action research, quantitative to qualitative research design. The purpose of this study was to develop a useful standardized hiring process at a state

This study uses a sequential, mixed method, action research, quantitative to qualitative research design. The purpose of this study was to develop a useful standardized hiring process at a state medical college that brings clarity to the hiring process and policies. Two conceptual frameworks guided the innovations in this study – communities of practice and Kotter’s change theory. To implement a standardized hiring process, a web-based intranet site was created through collaboration between the Academic Affairs and the Human Resources Departments of the medical college. The web-based intranet was built to be a hiring resource directed at training hiring managers and hiring committees. The hiring resource assists the departments hiring by bringing clarity to the hiring process, assisting in creating a standardized process for posting, recruiting, hiring, and on-boarding new employees, and allowing managers quick access to hiring tools.

Three sources provided data for this study: (1) Pre/Post Hiring Manager/Committee Questionnaire, (2) Interviews with key hiring managers, and (3) Google Analytics.

The study found that all participants found the overall hiring resource “useful” and “effective.” All measured components of the hiring resource were also found to be “useful” and “effective.” The site continues to increase in new users and returning users weekly. The hiring resource is used regularly by the college’s Human Resources Department and is sent to all hiring managers when they begin their hiring process and is introduced in “Managing the UA Way” which is a professional development program for new managers at the college. This study shows that web-based resources are a useful and effective instrument for training staff in a medical school context. More research needs to be conducted to measure the full potential of training higher education staff via web-based and online programs. This research project hopes to inspire other higher education institutions to create, measure, and implement training programs for staff.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Training for music administration: meeting the needs of future music faculty

Description

Department chairs or school directors, as the bridge between administration and faculty, and closely associated with the teaching and learning at the heart of the institution, hold very important roles

Department chairs or school directors, as the bridge between administration and faculty, and closely associated with the teaching and learning at the heart of the institution, hold very important roles in the departments or schools they oversee. Many chairs and department administrators in music schools and departments are selected from the faculty of the department and asked to serve as the chief administrator. They assume a set of duties that, to that point, have been beyond the purview of their academic training and professional experience--particularly for those with training in the performance disciplines. While usually successful as teachers, these new chairs and department heads face a difficult transition into administrative work because the skills required for an effective administrator are very different from those necessary to be an effective teacher.

The purpose of this research was to ascertain the knowledge and skills that would be most practical for individuals aspiring to administrative or leadership roles in schools or departments of music, and to design a doctoral cognate that would supply that knowledge. The author reviewed the available research into administrative training for individuals pursuing administrative work in schools and departments of music. Interviews were then conducted with current or former music administrators from across the United States, inquiring about their experiences as administrators, any administrative training they received, and the types of things they wished they had known when first working in an administrative capacity. The author used this information to make recommendations concerning the creation of a doctoral cognate in administration for graduate students preparing to become music faculty so that they are equipped to undertake administrative responsibilities.

The resulting cognate area consists of four courses: a course in finance, budgeting, and development; a course on organizational structure and behavior; a course on management and leadership theory; and a practicum or independent study in administration, in which students spend time observing and shadowing their department administrator(s) to apply the principles learned in the previous three courses.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Between markets and government: essays on nonprofitness and the institutional transformation of child welfare agencies

Description

In many respects, the current public child welfare system closely resembles that of over 100 years ago. Then, as well as now, nonprofit child welfare agencies are the critical providers

In many respects, the current public child welfare system closely resembles that of over 100 years ago. Then, as well as now, nonprofit child welfare agencies are the critical providers of service delivery to vulnerable children and their families. Contemporary nonprofits, however, are confronted with social and fiscal pressures to conform to normative practices and behaviors of governmental and for-profit organizations. Simultaneously, these agencies may also feel compelled to behave in accordance with a nonprofit normative ethic. Yet, scholars and practitioners are often unaware of how these different forces may be shaping the practices of child welfare agencies and, the nonprofit sector in general. This multi-paper dissertation examines how managerial and organizational practices of child welfare nonprofits are influenced business, government, and other nonprofit organizations and the extent to which processes process of institutional isomorphism in child welfare nonprofits are happening. Data was collected from a national ample of 184 child welfare administrators to explore marketization practices, collaboration behaviors, and managerial priorities of these agencies. Multinomial logistic, ordered logistic, and ordinary least squares regression, and historical analysis help shed light on the contemporary practices of these agencies. The results reveal that these agency's behaviors are shaped by government control, influences from the business community, identification with a nonprofit mindset (i.e., nonprofitness), funding streams, and various other factors. One key finding is that identification with a nonprofit mindset encourages certain behaviors like collaboration with other nonprofits and placing greater importance on key managerial priorities, but it does not reduce the likelihood of adopting business management strategies. Another important finding is that government control and funding does not have as strong as an influence on child welfare nonprofits as expected; however, influence from the business community does strongly affect many of their practices. The implications of these findings are discussed for child welfare agencies and the nonprofit sector in general. The consequences of nonprofits operating similarly to business and government are considered.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Pedagogy of scholarship in higher education administration

Description

The purpose of this phenomenological hermeneutic study was to explore the meaning found in the lived-experience of producing scholarship for five higher education administrators from within the major areas of

The purpose of this phenomenological hermeneutic study was to explore the meaning found in the lived-experience of producing scholarship for five higher education administrators from within the major areas of administration in higher education--academic affairs, business affairs, and student affairs--from a single research university in the western United States. In the historical and recent scholarship in and about the three fields of higher education administration, academic affairs, business affairs, and student affairs, one issue that has not been addressed is what it is like to produce scholarship as an administrator. Current scholarship in the field helps administrative practice by focusing on the practice of administration; however, current literature did not provide an understanding of what it means to do scholarship as an administrator. Thus, the challenges and rewards of producing scholarship as a practicing administrator, creating the first step toward a possible new era in the practice of scholarship on college campuses, were explored in the this study. Individual semi-structured interviews were the primary source of data. The structured questions were used to set up the un-structured questions used to explore specific examples and instances pertaining to producing scholarship as an administrator. A three-step data analysis process was used to develop both an understanding of what scholarship means for each participant and an interpretation of the meaning of producing scholarship as a higher education administrator. Across all of the lived-experiences and the participants' varied scholarly endeavors, each administrator was more connected to education and contributed more to the educational environment by participating in scholarly activities. The administrators were found to be more connected to the people within the university, their own field of practice, and with the university itself.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011