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Best Practices for Undergraduate Mental Health Support for Study Abroad

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This paper describes a mixed methods investigation of undergraduate mental health support practices at Arizona State University (ASU), as well as an outside look at peer and other leading institutions. Methods employed in this study include: ASU undergraduate student survey

This paper describes a mixed methods investigation of undergraduate mental health support practices at Arizona State University (ASU), as well as an outside look at peer and other leading institutions. Methods employed in this study include: ASU undergraduate student survey to assess perception of resources provided by ASU and the likelihood to disclose physical and mental health conditions, key informant interviews to understand ASU mental health support from the perspective of those who implement support measures, participant observation of study abroad events that provide resources to prospective and pre-departure students, and a document review of the study abroad website from peer and other institutions. The target population of this study is undergraduate students who participate or plan to participate in study abroad programs across the United States. The sample population for the undergraduate student survey is undergraduate students at ASU, as well as sixteen institutions for the document review. Significant findings from the research include student concerns about financial and academic barriers to study abroad, as well as a greater likelihood to disclose physical health conditions rather than mental health conditions due to fear of stigma or of being a burden to program coordinators. Additionally, it was found that there is a separation between available resources and student awareness and use of these resources. ASU can work to remedy this disconnect by explicitly presenting easily accessible resource information on the website and in pre-departure materials, as well as addressing mental health awareness abroad in an inclusive manner towards all students in addition to those with pre-existing mental health conditions. Overall, more work should be done to fulfill the vision of comprehensive mental health support at ASU.

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2018-05

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Marketing the Study Abroad Experience: An Investigation of Student Motivations and Obstacles to Studying Abroad

Description

Study abroad provides an opportunity for students to grow, earn academic credit, and explore the world. The experience helps students develop a new set of skills and engage in another culture. However, only a small percentage of students across the

Study abroad provides an opportunity for students to grow, earn academic credit, and explore the world. The experience helps students develop a new set of skills and engage in another culture. However, only a small percentage of students across the United States participate in this opportunity. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate why students study abroad or choose not to. More specifically, this study examines the motivations and obstacles students have to studying abroad. The other questions that contribute to this study are: Why are students unable to study abroad? How do certain personality traits affect a student's choice to study abroad? How can university study abroad organizations attract more students to participate in their programs? Before conducting research, the author reflected on her reasons for studying abroad, the problems she encountered, and her overall experience. Based on her experience and knowledge as an ASU Study Abroad Recruiter, she identified the different types of students who have not studied abroad. These are: students who plan to study abroad, are unable to study abroad, and who do not want to study abroad. To address the purpose of this study, the author created survey questions based on her experience and background research. She conducted research through a survey on Qualtrics and administered it to college students in the W.P. Carey School of Business. After reviewing the results, she came to several conclusions that can serve as guidelines for marketing study abroad to different types of students. Based on these conclusions, the author developed marketing messages to appeal to students with certain personality traits as well as to students who have not studied abroad. For each message, she created a sample of an ad that can be used in print materials or social media campaigns.

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2018-05

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Wondering Wanderer: A Collection of Personal Reflections

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Wondering Wanderer: A Collection of Personal Reflections is a creative project that captures the lifestyle and nuances of Florence, Italy through photographs paired with nonfiction flash captions. Excerpts from the novel, The Stones of Florence by Mary McCarthy served as the inspiration for these pieces.

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2018-05

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Vermillion Comedic Anthology

Description

The Vermillion Comedic Anthology comprises of three works of fiction, each around fifteen pages in length. The stories were written throughout the course of Hunter Vermillion’s residency in the English: Creative Writing (Fiction) program at Arizona State University. The first

The Vermillion Comedic Anthology comprises of three works of fiction, each around fifteen pages in length. The stories were written throughout the course of Hunter Vermillion’s residency in the English: Creative Writing (Fiction) program at Arizona State University. The first story Study-a-Broad, was written in his capstone fiction class, while the second story Herald’s Horticulture was the first piece Hunter wrote in his first fiction class.

The content of these stories is edgy, humorous, satirical (unlike this abstract), and generally absurd—all this while retaining elements of realism. “Realism” in the sense that any of these stories could occur; there are no supernatural elements contained. However, the actions and characters are so exaggerated that their purposes are to call attention to the character/societal flaws to which they reflect. The more edgy elements of these stories are not included for shock value; in fact, just the opposite. Their sparse use is purposeful to call extra attention to a certain scene or action. Often a story’s use of crude language is intended characterize these despicable actions as negative—to show that a boss should not be treating those around him like servants, for instance (as is the case in the story Fore!).

Disclaimer aside, the true intention of these stories is simple: to entertain. These are humorous pieces, aimed at poking fun at some typical college, workplace, and neighborhood drama. That’s not to say the pieces are devoid of any deeper meaning, because as described above, they seek to satirize overlooked bits of culture. However, the overarching goal of the Vermillion Comedic Anthology is to entertain readers and provide them much need escape from the stresses of the world.

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2019-05

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Ethical Considerations in ASU Study Abroad Programs

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This thesis project examines the ethical considerations within study abroad programs at Arizona State University through the use of a survey of past study abroad students and analysis of research in the field. Topics of consideration include environmental impact and

This thesis project examines the ethical considerations within study abroad programs at Arizona State University through the use of a survey of past study abroad students and analysis of research in the field. Topics of consideration include environmental impact and sustainability, impact on local economies, history and current events of the host country, laws and rights of the students, politics and religion, and social norms, values, and beliefs, among others. Through this analysis, a pre-departure guide has been created in order to ensure that topics of responsible travel are easily accessible to students in study abroad programs.

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2019-05

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Study Abroad Programs and the Culture Shock Phenomenon: A Comprehensive Analysis of Liability, Risk, and the Efficacy of Preparation

Description

As undergraduate students focus on the perceived adventure, growth opportunities, social connections, freedom and fun, they may not be aware of the dangers and risks associated with studying abroad. Despite university-created crisis prevention measures such as policies, documentation, and orientations

As undergraduate students focus on the perceived adventure, growth opportunities, social connections, freedom and fun, they may not be aware of the dangers and risks associated with studying abroad. Despite university-created crisis prevention measures such as policies, documentation, and orientations warning of the risk of travel, students who study abroad face some form of a crisis every year. Universities warn travelers of the dangers of crime and the psychological issues associated with liminal experiences and culture shock, preparing students for the harsh reality that immersion into a foreign culture is an intense and sometimes taxing experience. Faculty and staff dedicate a tremendous amount of time and energy to ensure our students are braced for their travel experience, yet students still experience immense hardships. In a comprehensive analysis of this phenomenon, we seek to find and explore reasons and variables that account for this chasm. We suspect the reason for this chasm, despite good efforts, is the variance between the resources that are provided and needed both upon entry into host country, and re-entry into native country. In extensively reviewing existing scholarly literature, reviewing case studies, conducting examinations of multi-causal variables, and analyzing measurable data, we suggest that study abroad preparation resources must adapt in order to accommodate an ever-evolving undergraduate tourist experience. In Section I the research team provides an introduction and underscores the central question of the study. Section II includes an extensive literature review in order to establish a definition of culture shock, determine what universities currently do to mitigate culture shock and risk, and assess the efficacy of these strategies. The research team subsequently identifies a lacuna -- the gap or point of departure from existing literature and research that this study seeks to fill. Section III presents our hypothesis, while Section IV offers an outline of precise Methodology. Section V includes an in-depth Data Analysis using findings dependent upon surveys and interviews as discussed in Methodology. Section VI presents policy recommendations or a “fix” based upon findings presented in Data Analysis. Section VII presents a conclusion, offering a culmination of deductions and implications, proving the relevance of this study to Arizona State University.

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2019-05

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What Does Being A Global Citizen Really Mean?

Description

Global citizenship is a term that is popularly used in today's society, especially in educational institutions. I believe that many of us are not properly educated about its history and context. As a result, the term is widely misused. My

Global citizenship is a term that is popularly used in today's society, especially in educational institutions. I believe that many of us are not properly educated about its history and context. As a result, the term is widely misused. My intense interest in people around the world and how we are all connected in some form led me to explore the underlying meaning of the term "Global Citizen". This topic is relevant as it will create a clearer insight for students into the generically used term "Global Citizen" and will help people understand the appropriate use of the term. I incorporated research gathered from Arizona State University partners while I was studying abroad at King's College London, examples of how Arizona State University promotes global citizenship, and my personal experience of evolving into a global citizen. I have researched what the term means to international professionals, organizations, and myself, and the benefits and obstacles of being a "Global Citizen".

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2018-12

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Changing Conceptions of the Israel-Palestine Situation: An Analysis of the Effects of Study Abroad

Description

An ever increasing number of university students partake in study abroad opportunities. Extant research has measured the effects of such experiences on the students who participate in them. Nonetheless, this research tends to rely on comparative analyses between study abroad

An ever increasing number of university students partake in study abroad opportunities. Extant research has measured the effects of such experiences on the students who participate in them. Nonetheless, this research tends to rely on comparative analyses between study abroad participants and control groups of students who do not travel abroad. Furthermore, data are often retrospectively collected and are thus subject to individual retention, which may entail significant limitations. This research attempts to subvert these limitations by using a pre- and post-test methodology coupled with qualitative analysis. The study consists of in-depth qualitative interviews with nineteen participants who partook in a semester abroad at the Rothberg International School at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In contrast to previous research which has attempted to ascertain general effects, the aim of this research is to measure the effects of study abroad on individuals’ conceptions and perspectives as they relate to the Israel-Palestine situation and the groups involved. The results indicate that the participant group which consisted of both Jewish and non-Jewish individuals did, in fact, demonstrate changes in their perceptions and perspectives at the conclusion of their study abroad experience. Specifically, the majority of individuals reported more critical views of the Israeli state and its governmental policies in addition to demonstrated increases in empathetic sentiment towards Palestinian individuals. The results are discussed in relation to future research which perhaps could be utilized to further promote perception change and subversion of dominant narratives by fostering intergroup openness and interaction.

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Date Created
2019-05

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What Students Say Can Pave the Way: Creating Open Dialogue for Study Abroad Experiences

Description

The number of undergraduate students participating in short-term experiences in global health (STEGHs) abroad has increased dramatically in recent years (Eyler 2002, Drain et al. 2007). These experiences, in tandem with classroom learning, are designed to help students master skills

The number of undergraduate students participating in short-term experiences in global health (STEGHs) abroad has increased dramatically in recent years (Eyler 2002, Drain et al. 2007). These experiences, in tandem with classroom learning, are designed to help students master skills related to global health competencies, including cultural humility and sensitivity, collaborating with community partners, and sociocultural and political awareness. Although STEGHs offer potential benefits to both students and to sending institutions, these experiences can sometimes be problematic and raise ethical challenges. As the number of students engaged in STEGHs continues to increase, it is important to better understand the impact of these programs on student learning. Current ethical and best practice guidelines for STEGHs state that programs should establish evaluation methods to solicit feedback from students both during and on completion of the program (Crump et al. 2010). However, there is currently no established method for gathering this feedback because of the many different global health competency frameworks, types and duration of programs, and different models of student engagement in such programs. Assessing the quality of a STEGH is a profoundly important and difficult question that cannot be answered as succinctly and quantitatively as classroom performance, which has more standard and established assessment metrics. The goal of this project is to identify the most appropriate and useful assessment metric(s) for determining educational quality and impact for STEGHs at ASU by comparing a typical quantitative evaluation tool (pre-post survey with brief open-ended questions) to a more in-depth qualitative method (key informant interviews). In performing my analysis I seek to examine if the latter can produce a richer narrative of student experiences to inform ongoing program evaluations. My research questions are: 1. What are the current qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods available to assess student learning during short-term experiences in global health? 2. How can current methodology for assessing student experiences with short-term experiences in global health be adapted to collect the most information from students? 3. How do student knowledge and attitudes change before and after their short-term experience in global health? Why is understanding those changes important for adapting programs? My end goal would be to use these new, optimal assessment methods for gathering student perspectives and experiences to adapt pre-departure trainings and post-experience debriefings for study abroad programs, both of which I believe will lead to more sustainable partnerships and a healthier understanding of global health work for students.

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2018-05

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“An Indescribable Experience: ” Nursing Students Studying and Serving Abroad

Description

“Study abroad” is a common term among college students. According to Open Doors annual report as published by the Institute of International Education (2019), one in ten students seeking a bachelor’s or associate’s degree will study abroad before they graduate.

“Study abroad” is a common term among college students. According to Open Doors annual report as published by the Institute of International Education (2019), one in ten students seeking a bachelor’s or associate’s degree will study abroad before they graduate. Additionally, 16% of students earning a bachelor’s degree in the United States (US) will study abroad in their undergraduate years. Students in major fields of study, such as business and social sciences, are most likely to study abroad. However, only 6.9% of health professions majors studied abroad in the 2017-2018 academic year (Institute of International Education, 2019). This study provides insight into how a study abroad program in Peru impacts nursing students’ perceptions and attitudes of intercultural interactions, which are fundamental in expanding and developing cultural competency. This study also demonstrates how the abroad experience with service learning could affect nursing practice.

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2020-05