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Pragmatic competence: the case of advice in second language acquisition (SLA) abroad

Description

Using Spencer-Oatey's rapport management approach, the present study evaluates the interlanguage pragmatic development of 17 native English-speaking American learners over the course of a semester in Spain, specifically in terms of the strategies they used in their second language (L2)

Using Spencer-Oatey's rapport management approach, the present study evaluates the interlanguage pragmatic development of 17 native English-speaking American learners over the course of a semester in Spain, specifically in terms of the strategies they used in their second language (L2) to manage rapport in an advice-giving, oral role-play situation at semester start and semester end. To allow for a more in-depth analysis of the effect that a semester abroad has on Spanish L2 advice-giving behaviors, the learners were grouped into two distinct proficiency levels. Group 1 (n=9) represents learners who entered the semester abroad with a beginning to intermediate-low proficiency level and group 2 (n=8) represents learners who entered the semester abroad with an intermediate-high proficiency level. The results indicate that both learner groups had similar overarching behavioral expectations in this context. Specifically, both sets of learners expressed empathy, involvement, and respect for the interlocutor, while at the same time they used advice-giving strategies of varied illocutionary force to claim authority in addressing the interlocutor's dilemma. Both groups also balanced face sensitivities through strategies that both enhanced and challenged the interlocutor's identity face. However, it is argued that in this context claiming authority and challenging the interlocutor's identity face were permitted behaviors that emphasized the relational goals of the participants. Additionally, when developmental differences between the two proficiency levels were analyzed, the results showed that learner proficiency had an impact on specific strategy choices.

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Date Created
2011

Sierra Sage

Description

This project includes a travel blog made while studying abroad in Dublin, Ireland during spring semester of 2020. The blog is called Sierra Sage and can be found at https://sierrasage.travel.blog/. The project also includes data and analysis from six

This project includes a travel blog made while studying abroad in Dublin, Ireland during spring semester of 2020. The blog is called Sierra Sage and can be found at https://sierrasage.travel.blog/. The project also includes data and analysis from six paid advertisement campaigns made on Google and Facebook/Instagram. The blog includes 24 blog posts targeted toward students interested in study abroad and/or travel, and each campaign on both platforms applies to a separate blog post written as part of the project. The paid advertisements were completed using funding from Barrett, The Honors College.

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Date Created
2020-12

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First-generation strength: supporting first-generation college students in study abroad

Description

First-generation college students are an underrepresented group in terms of study

abroad participation nationally and at Arizona State University (ASU). The ASU and

International Studies Abroad (ISA) Planning Scholars Scholarship Program was

developed to support first-generation college students in their pursuit of study

First-generation college students are an underrepresented group in terms of study

abroad participation nationally and at Arizona State University (ASU). The ASU and

International Studies Abroad (ISA) Planning Scholars Scholarship Program was

developed to support first-generation college students in their pursuit of study abroad.

This mixed-methods study examined what the specific needs of first-generation college

students are as they pursue study abroad experiences and what effect the ASU and ISA

Planning Scholars Program had on them. A combination of surveys, semi-structured

interviews, and a photovoice project provided data for the study. Key findings included

that first-generation college students had concerns about finances, finding a study abroad

program that would keep them on track for graduation, making friends while they study

abroad, and traveling abroad alone. The study indicated that the Planning Scholars

program did increase students’ confidence in pursuing study abroad. Additionally, the

theory of First-Generation Strength was developed which suggests that first-generation

college students possess certain strengths and capital that help them overcome a variety

of new obstacles and make them an ideal candidate for study abroad due to their

experiences with having to navigate new contexts, such as going to college,

independently.

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Created

Date Created
2017