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It "breaks down this wall: dualities in journalists' engagement with Twitter followers

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Scholars have identified that journalists have a strong occupational identity, leading to ideological conceptions of the rules of the field. However, while journalists are often the first to embrace technological change, they often do so in different ways than most

Scholars have identified that journalists have a strong occupational identity, leading to ideological conceptions of the rules of the field. However, while journalists are often the first to embrace technological change, they often do so in different ways than most people. With the arrival of digital technologies, journalists are often faced with practices that run contrary to long-established ideology, and they often carry traditional practices over to new media. Using the theoretical lens of Giddens’s structuration theory, this research identifies traditional journalism structures that encourage or discourage journalists to interact with their followers on the social network Twitter. Using constant comparative analysis to interpret 23 interviews with contemporary journalists, this study identified multiple dualities between the use of Twitter and traditional newsgathering. It also recognized a cognitive dissonance among journalists who use Twitter. Though they can see advantages to using the platform to engage with followers, particularly other journalists and members of their audience, journalists do not seek out Twitter interaction and often avoid or resist it. Finally, this dissertation suggests three walls that block journalists from engaging in the Internet’s facilitation of personal connectivity, engagement, and a true community forum with followers. Although a wall of objectivity has somewhat been broached by Twitter use, walls of storytelling and routine and traditional news values continue to hold strong.

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2015

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Gatekeeping practices of participants in a digital media literacy massive open online course (MOOC)

Description

Long before “fake news” dominated the conversation within and about the media, media literacy advocates have championed the need for media literacy education that provides the tools for people to understand, analyze, and evaluate media messages. That the majority of

Long before “fake news” dominated the conversation within and about the media, media literacy advocates have championed the need for media literacy education that provides the tools for people to understand, analyze, and evaluate media messages. That the majority of U.S. adults now consume news on social media underscores the importance for students of all ages to be critical users of media. Furthermore, the affordances of social media to like, comment, and share news items within one’s network increases an individual’s responsibility to ascertain the veracity of news before using a social media megaphone to spread false information. Social media’s shareability can dictate how information spreads, increasing news consumers’ role as a gatekeeper of information and making media literacy education more important than ever.

This research examines the media literacy practices that news consumers use to inform their gatekeeping decisions. Using a constant comparative coding method, the author conducted a qualitative analysis of hundreds of discussion board posts from adult participants in a digital media literacy Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) to identify major themes and examine growth in participants’ sense of responsibility related to sharing news information, their feeling of empowerment to make informed decisions about the media messages they receive, and how the media literacy tools and techniques garnered from the MOOC have affected their daily media interactions. Findings emphasize the personal and contextual nature of media literacy, and that those factors must be addressed to ensure the success of a media literacy education program.

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Date Created
2018

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Personal Narratives of Health by TV Anchors and Reporters: Issues of Control Over Social Media and Professional Expression

Description

Broadcast journalists often report on people dealing with illness or physical hardship, their difficulties and triumphs. But what happens when journalists personally experience those kinds of health-related issues? This study explores how 24 local and national on-air journalists share how

Broadcast journalists often report on people dealing with illness or physical hardship, their difficulties and triumphs. But what happens when journalists personally experience those kinds of health-related issues? This study explores how 24 local and national on-air journalists share how they manage life with illness and hardship using personal narratives shared on their professional social media pages, detailing how the journalists navigate sharing a deeply personal experience while maintaining a professional journalistic persona. Thematic analysis found the journalists’ performed three acts when sharing personal health information in a public forum: they reported on their illness, they were transparent, and they justified their actions. Within the three themes a range of expression – from personal to professional – and influences over content were found, leading to the final overarching theme, implications and consequences on content creation. This dissertation finds a complicated struggle to maintain a professional self while acknowledging the urge to connect with others through a deeply personal experience.

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Created

Date Created
2019

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The role of American consultants in the development of television news broadcasting in the United Kingdom in the 1990s

Description

U.S. television is about earning profits, but European broadcasting has historically been governed as public service, indirectly or directly operated by the government. Substantial changes occurred in the 1990s. Privatization and the United Kingdom’s Independent Television franchise auction stimulated commercial

U.S. television is about earning profits, but European broadcasting has historically been governed as public service, indirectly or directly operated by the government. Substantial changes occurred in the 1990s. Privatization and the United Kingdom’s Independent Television franchise auction stimulated commercial developments throughout Europe. Even public service broadcasters lost their traditional characteristics, adopting routines making them almost indistinguishable from commercial competitors.

Television remains the number one news source overall. Research shows news adheres to similar, recurring and predictable elements; an anchor team balances the broadcast and its various elements, following a formula of friendly personalities, visuals and sound bites.

This study examined American news consultants’ role in the development of television news in the UK in the 1990s. American news consultants’ work abroad is important because they spread the U.S. model - the origin of today’s on-air news style – and changed television news on a global scale.

Limited research has been conducted on the consultants’ European work and how they operated, largely because of proprietary material. This study was based on 2359 pages of archival material from Frank N. Magid Associates’ European archives. In addition, 24 interviews with Magid staff and UK journalists allowed for a comprehensive examination.

Magid truly infiltrated UK television - from the headquarters of the BBC and ITN, to the regions. A major finding is the extent of Magid’s penetration with research services, storytelling and performance training. During the franchise auction, Magid worked with ITV clients in 11 of the 16 regions.

This study examined how Magid played a role in the development of television news. It analyzed key concepts integrated into UK news and how those are similar or different from the U.S. The importance of good storytelling permeated the findings. Tell a story well – tailored to the culture, medium and viewers – and it will attract an audience. In turn, that attracts advertisers, making news profitable. Change theory guided an analysis of societal forces. Driving forces, such as privatization and technology, spurred on development of television news; restraining forces, such as fear of Americanization, slowed it down.

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Date Created
2018

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The Evolving Journalist

Description

Abstract The intent of this research is to understand what it means to be a journalist in the 21st century. As technology continues to advance at an accelerated pace, industries must adapt in order to sustain business and keep people

Abstract The intent of this research is to understand what it means to be a journalist in the 21st century. As technology continues to advance at an accelerated pace, industries must adapt in order to sustain business and keep people employed. Journalism is a field that has struggled to find a way to monetize the services it provides with the overwhelming abundance of information that is now accessible for anyone on the Internet. As a result, journalism has expanded to become more than a source for news and information; it is an area of interest, topic of discussion, and connector for both consumers and producers to create, interact with, share, and engage in. The goals for this study are focused around three main research questions that aim to uncover differences in the journalism field today compared to 10-20 years ago, what skills and traits are required for students to become journalists in the 21st century, and how this data and information should affect journalism education. 1. How does the change from tradition mediums to digital change journalism jobs? 2. What skills and traits are required for students to become successful journalists? 3. How should this data affect journalism education? The research for this thesis was collected using a variety of methods including observation, interviews, and surveys from a sample data population of journalism students, recent journalism graduates, journalism professors and professionals from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. While there are many ways to interpret and analyze why and how the journalism field has changed, most of the research uncovers what young journalists moving forward in the field can do to prepare for the changes they will face in the future. While striving to uncover what the most important traits for young journalists to have entering the journalism field today, the data showed the answer varied depending on the individual. Across all three categories of the data sample of students, graduates, and professionals/professors, honesty, curiosity, and hardworking were important traits needed to be successful in the journalism field. According to the sample of data recorded in the survey, writing was the number one skill journalists need to be successful in the 21st century. This study also revealed how the evolution of the journalism field allows opportunities for new ideas and innovation for journalism education. According to interviews with professors and professionals, journalism education should focus on a hands-on learning approach that spans across multiple disciplines like business, design, communication, technology, science, etc. Because it is important for journalists to be multi-disciplinary in their field, journalism schools must teach multi-disciplinary skills and allow for new ideas and creativity in media innovation.

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Date Created
2015-05

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A Feminist Perspective on Glamour Magazine

Description

The magazine industry plays an important role in shaping how women speak, act, and perceive themselves and others. This industry presents pleasure, consumerism, and a cult of femininity to its largely female readers. The purpose of the literature review was

The magazine industry plays an important role in shaping how women speak, act, and perceive themselves and others. This industry presents pleasure, consumerism, and a cult of femininity to its largely female readers. The purpose of the literature review was to understand the culture of women's magazines and find a method of examination that would fit best with the intent of this thesis project. Based on this research, the project involved reconstructing a series of Glamour magazine articles from a feminist perspective. This study looked at the degree to which Glamour's editorial content and graphics matched its editorial policy. By researching previous studies of women's magazines, the literature review guided the reframing of Glamour articles from a feminist perspective. Most of the studies reviewed were written in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, when the radical feminist movement was at its peak. Since then, few analyses have been made on the topic of feminism and women's magazines. This project offered an update on that research by looking at current women's magazines and evaluating if their content/graphics have improved over the last thirty years. Twelve Glamour magazine articles over a three-year period, 2012 to 2014, were selected at random to rewrite. By reconstructing the editorial content and graphics from the selected articles, this study hoped to create a more positive and beneficial magazine for women free of gender stereotypes. Rather than produce a magazine that criticizes women, the reconstructed version of Glamour included a voice that made women feel accepted. This required removing language that reinforced negative gender stereotypes and content that urged women to be perfect, please men, look a certain way, and more. This study found that Glamour is actually a lot closer to representing this gender-neutral magazine ideal than previously thought and creating a gender-neutral magazine is possible with thoughtful editing.

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Date Created
2015-12

Imaging Roosevelt Row: Identity Construction Through Street Style Fashion

Description

This thesis analyzes identity construction through street style fashion in the city. The focus of this project is Roosevelt Row, the artists' district in Downtown Phoenix. The goal of this project is to compare Roosevelt Row's marketing image with the

This thesis analyzes identity construction through street style fashion in the city. The focus of this project is Roosevelt Row, the artists' district in Downtown Phoenix. The goal of this project is to compare Roosevelt Row's marketing image with the fashion seen on the streets and at events in the area. The creative project involved the creation of an iPad publication displaying the street style fashions seen on Roosevelt Row. This project aims to analyze if the street style fashion seen on Roosevelt Row reflects the marketing image of the area.

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Date Created
2015-12

Situated Journalism

Description

There's a growing trend of transparency in the media that has been reflected in the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics. SPJ advocates that journalists "explain ethical choices and processes to the audience" and "expose unethical conduct." Transparency currently

There's a growing trend of transparency in the media that has been reflected in the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics. SPJ advocates that journalists "explain ethical choices and processes to the audience" and "expose unethical conduct." Transparency currently means taking responsibility for your work and not allowing yourself to be compromised by conflicts of interest. It doesn't usually mean being open about your beliefs, positions and perspectives. We would argue that it could, and should. There are many examples of publications making mistakes because they lacked the knowledge and understanding of someone from a different perspective. Additionally, there are many examples of journalists lacking in information because they were trying to remain objective. There should be a place where journalists can be open about where they are coming from and give their perspective on a situation. Using many different perspectives we can build a bigger, and more accurate, picture around the context of a situation. This thesis project examines objectivity and proposes a new philosophical approach based on Situated Knowledges by Donna Haraway. We examine media case studies to expose issues with the coverage of news when objectivity is the main goal.

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2016-05

Recommendations for Implementing Journalism Programs for the Montessori Secondary Education System

Description

This thesis provides recommendations to implement journalism and publishing programs into Montessori secondary education systems. This applies to students of 11 years or older that can be found in more than 210 Montessori schools across the nation, according to the

This thesis provides recommendations to implement journalism and publishing programs into Montessori secondary education systems. This applies to students of 11 years or older that can be found in more than 210 Montessori schools across the nation, according to the American Montessori Society. Much of the foundation for this thesis is created by my own experience starting a journalism program at Desert Garden Montessori School in Phoenix, Arizona. The literature review looks at the history of Montessori education; the differences between Montessori education and traditional public schooling; the benefits of journalism programs for secondary education systems; and the observed fit between journalism and Montessori philosophies. The greater research explores my experience as a journalism adviser for Desert Garden Montessori School, and my own lessons learned through the spring 2015 semester. The final suggestions for a journalism program are split into three sections: those by the Desert Garden Montessori students, by certified members of American Montessori Society, and my own final recommendations. It then looks into areas for further research to solidify the expansion of journalism programs into other Montessori schools. The appendices contain newsroom documents and material published during my time as journalism adviser for Desert Garden Montessori School. This includes the magazines and stories created by the newsroom students.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Give It To Me Straight: A Newsgame About the LGBT Community and the Media

Description

The purpose of this thesis was to undertake the creation of a newsgame to create a new teaching tool for journalism schools to better prepare journalism and mass communication majors for covering minority communities. Give It To Me Straight is

The purpose of this thesis was to undertake the creation of a newsgame to create a new teaching tool for journalism schools to better prepare journalism and mass communication majors for covering minority communities. Give It To Me Straight is a drag-and-drop puzzle newsgame that tasks players with completing real headlines from the past about the LGBT community. The written portion of this thesis analyzes the history of news coverage of gays and lesbians illustrating how the journalism industry readily discriminated against or ignored sexual minorities in the United States. The analysis also includes original research about how Cronkite School students view their role in covering minorities. The results revealed shortfalls in the Cronkite Schools curriculum and raised concerns if the school meets the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication's standards.

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Date Created
2016-05