Matching Items (91)

Anderson, Doug

Description

Doug Anderson came to ASU in the summer of 1979 and joined the newly formed College of Public Programs. He left ASU as the Director of the Walter Cronkite School

Doug Anderson came to ASU in the summer of 1979 and joined the newly formed College of Public Programs. He left ASU as the Director of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Important ASU stories include:
1) the birth of the COLLEGE OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS,
2) the Tempe Campus SIZE and working ENVIRONMENT in 1979.
3) the naming of the WALTER CRONKITE School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and
4) the importance of the 1987 accreditation as a turning point for the School of Journalism and Mass Communications

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-03-12

132842-Thumbnail Image.png

Touchdowns to TV

Description

In this research paper I explore former male athletes, specifically professional football players entering local journalism. Research paired with interviews in regards to the topic explain why there are nearly

In this research paper I explore former male athletes, specifically professional football players entering local journalism. Research paired with interviews in regards to the topic explain why there are nearly 10 former NFL players in local markets where an NFL team is present, and why local journalists along with future journalists should not be worried about the number of former male athletes in local journalism. The paper also dives into the side-by-side statistics of why there is significantly more former college athletes in local journalism than former NFL players. The research focused on more than 100 television stations, revealing that 100 former or current collegiate or pro athletes are journalists for local stations where an NFL team is present. The data is solely reliant on the information that the journalists provided in their bios on the station websites. This could be seen as a possible limitation, however, the likelihood of these journalists either lying or not identifying as a former athlete is minimal due to the size of the accomplishment of actually participating in college as an athlete. The basis of my research is to figure out if former NFL players and former athletes in general are taking journalism jobs from aspiring journalists. I conclude that future journalists are not at risk of losing jobs when it comes to retired football players entering the field of local journalism. With that said, aspiring journalists need to continue to develop their social media skills to compete with athletes’ audiences on social networks.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132843-Thumbnail Image.png

Language Used when Covering People with Disabilities

Description

News outlets frequently portray people with disabilities as either helpless victims or objects of motivation. Portrayal of people with disabilities has improved over the years, but there is still room

News outlets frequently portray people with disabilities as either helpless victims or objects of motivation. Portrayal of people with disabilities has improved over the years, but there is still room to grow. News outlets tend to make disability the center of the story. A story about a disabled person is primarily about their disability, with their other accomplishments framed by it.

As one example of the victimhood narrative, ABC News used to run a special called My Extreme Affliction as part of 20/20 until 2012. As the name implies, the specials covered people with disabilities, specifically extreme versions. One 2008 episode on Tourette’s syndrome described Tourette’s like it was some sort of demonic possession. The narrator talked about children who were “prisoners in their own bodies” and a family that was at risk of being “torn apart by Tourette’s.” I have Tourette’s syndrome myself, which made ABC’s special especially uncomfortable to watch. When not wringing their metaphorical hands over the “victims” of disability, many news outlets fall into the “supercrip” narrative. They refer to people as “heroes” who “overcome” their disabilities to achieve something that ranges from impressive to utterly mundane. The main emphasis is on the disability rather than the person who has it. These articles then exploit that disability to make readers feel good. As a person with a disability, I am aware that it impacts my life, but it is not the center of my life. The tics from my Tourette’s syndrome made it difficult to speak to people when I was younger, but even then they did not rule me.

Disability coverage, however, is still incredibly important for promoting acceptance and giving people with disabilities a voice. A little over a fifth of adults in the United States have a disability (CDC: 53 million adults in the US live with a disability), so poor coverage means marginalizing or even excluding a large amount of people. Journalists should try to reach their entire audience. The news helps shape public opinion with the stories it features. Therefore, it should provide visibility for people with disabilities in order to increase acceptance. This is a matter of civil rights. People with disabilities deserve fair and accurate representation.

My personal experience with ABC’s Tourette’s special leads me to believe that the media, especially the news, needs to be more responsible in their reporting. Even the name “My Extreme Affliction” paints a poor picture of what to expect. A show that focuses on sensationalist portrayals in pursuit of views further ostracizes people with disabilities. The emphasis should be on a person and not their condition. The National Center for Disability Journalism tells reporters to “Focus on the person you are interviewing, not the disability” (Tips for interviewing people with disabilities). This people-first approach is the way to improve disability coverage: Treat people with disabilities with the same respect as any other minority group.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132739-Thumbnail Image.png

Arizona Service Animals: Raising Awareness of Statewide Laws and Practices

Description

The definition of a service animal is often misunderstood by the public. This makes life more difficult for individuals with disabilities who rely on service animals to function and navigate

The definition of a service animal is often misunderstood by the public. This makes life more difficult for individuals with disabilities who rely on service animals to function and navigate through society.

“Arizona Service Animals” is a creative project in the form of a website
( ArizonaServiceAnimals.com ) designed to provide the public with information,
resources, and true stories about service animals in the state of Arizona.

The site covers the different types of support animals, the training process, the legal rights of service animal handlers and businesses, and Arizona’s new law regarding fake service animals.

It also includes the stories of real service animal handlers and trainers who share their experiences and explain what they would like the public to know.

This paper provides context into the history of dogs and service dogs, as well as
information on the three types of support animals. It also includes the methodology of the project.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

The Long Alchemy of Becoming: Aqua es Vida Film

Description

“The Long Alchemy of Becoming: Aqua es Vida” is a short, artistic film depicting the history of the Universe shown through the microcosm of the Mexican town, Cuatro Ciénegas, in

“The Long Alchemy of Becoming: Aqua es Vida” is a short, artistic film depicting the history of the Universe shown through the microcosm of the Mexican town, Cuatro Ciénegas, in the state of Coahuila. The film takes the viewer from the start of the universe to what scientists believe will be its end, via a poem written by Dr. James Elser. “The Long Alchemy of Becoming: Aqua es Vida” starts with the Big Bang, through the formation of matter, stars, planets, including Earth. From there, the viewer witnesses how life evolved illustrated via scenes in the ciénegas (‘marsh’ in Spanish) found in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico. The film explores how life expanded out from water, producing plants and animals, including humans. Then, modern life in Cuatro Ciénegas is shown, including the modern agricultural practices that are threatening to destroy the ciénegas that sustain long histories of microbial evolution. The film concludes with the end mankind and the eventual destruction of Earth by the dying sun. Cuatro Ciénegas is a biologically and ecologically significant location, because its pools and marshes are home to many endemic species, including stromatolites, which are very rare, bio-chemical living structures. This film is part of a National Science Foundation grant, and reflects the extensive scientific research efforts in and around Cuatro Ciénegas and its unique pools.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

134681-Thumbnail Image.png

FOIA: The Lock and Key to Government Records

Description

The Freedom of Information Act (1966), an amendment altering Section Three of the Administrative Procedure Act (1964), outlines the rules and regulations for United States citizens to obtain federal government

The Freedom of Information Act (1966), an amendment altering Section Three of the Administrative Procedure Act (1964), outlines the rules and regulations for United States citizens to obtain federal government records. The act, written with the guidance of journalists, was created for all members of the public, but with the intent that the press would be the primary users of the legislation. The authors of the act believed the press would utilize FOIA to enhance its ability to accomplish its duty of keeping the public informed. Now, 51 years after the act was passed into law, critics say FOIA has not satisfactorily allowed the press or the public in general to inform and be informed. Issues with demand rates, unorganized systems and subjective interpretations of the act have combined to lock information from public access through an act that was intended to be the key to it. The data from annual federal agency FOIA reports to the attorney general from 2008 to 2015 have indicated that, in multiple metrics, FOIA has increasingly struggled to fulfill and often has failed to provide records to requesting parties. These trends have inspired a discussion among journalists and right-to-information advocates about how to best resolve the issues that have contributed to them. Proposed solutions range from adjustments to requesters' approaches to the act, amendments to the act and even abandoning the act entirely in favor of constructing a new law.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

134920-Thumbnail Image.png

The Role of the News Media in Reporting on Suicide

Description

This thesis analyzes research on news media reporting and suicide statistics from the past several decades to determine the effect that reporting has on suicidal ideation and behavior within different

This thesis analyzes research on news media reporting and suicide statistics from the past several decades to determine the effect that reporting has on suicidal ideation and behavior within different populations. Within this paper, the term "news media" refers to print and broadcast journalism organizations (also referred to as mass media) that cover municipal, regional, national or international communities. This thesis is intended to illustrate the impact news media can have on the public's opinions, feelings, perspectives and understanding of facts. Specifically, this thesis aims to show how news media reports can change a community's awareness of, and appreciation for, the issue of suicide within that community and the world at large, especially among marginalized or neglected groups. Further, it seeks to help journalists understand the importance of responsible reporting by showing the negative consequences of irresponsible reporting and discussing the potential positive impact journalism can have if done correctly and appropriately. Finally, the paper concludes that the news media have, and continue to have, a firm hold over public perception when it comes to suicide and suggests journalistic best practices based on the reporting guidelines set forth by the leading authorities on the subject.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

135105-Thumbnail Image.png

Zero to Tolerant

Description

Academic integrity policies coded specifically for journalism schools or departments are devised for the purpose of fostering a realistic, informative learning environment. Plagiarism and fabrication are two of the most

Academic integrity policies coded specifically for journalism schools or departments are devised for the purpose of fostering a realistic, informative learning environment. Plagiarism and fabrication are two of the most egregious errors of judgment a journalist can commit, and journalism schools and departments address these errors through their academic integrity policies. Some schools take a zero-tolerance approach, often expelling the student after the first or second violation, while other schools take a tolerant approach, in which a student is permitted at least three violations before suspension is considered. In a time where plagiarizing and fabricating stories has never been easier to commit and never easier to catch, students must be prepared to understand plagiarism and fabrication with multimedia elements, such as video, audio, and photos. In this project, journalism academic integrity codes were gathered from across the U.S. and designated to a zero-tolerance, semi-tolerant or tolerant category the researcher designed in order to determine what is preparing students most for the real journalism world, and to suggest how some policies could improve themselves.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

The Endless Cycle of Neglect

Description

Parental substance abuse is the number one reason children are neglected and placed in foster care. More than 18,000 children were in out-of-home care in Arizona in 2015, the majority

Parental substance abuse is the number one reason children are neglected and placed in foster care. More than 18,000 children were in out-of-home care in Arizona in 2015, the majority of them for neglect. Reports to the Arizona Department of Child Safety are categorized by physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect. Neglect is the broadest category and 72.9 percent of the maltreatment reports DCS received between April and September 2015 were for child neglect. Experts say nationally, parental substance abuse is the main cause for the neglect of children. "The Endless Cycle of Neglect" is an in-depth story about the effects of parental substance abuse leading to children being placed in foster care. The research was conducted through reviews of data available in public records and interviews with experts and adults who were in placed in foster care after experiencing neglect by parents who were abusing substances. The story is built into a multimedia website with elements such as photos, embedded audio, and infographics. The story follows Amber Anderson, whose father was a drug addict, and chronicles the events in her life that led to her being placed in foster care and ultimately losing her children to foster care because of neglect. Anderson shared her story of neglect, her time as a prostitute, and the events that led to her losing custody of her children. The website that the story is hosted on, kuntharathesis.com, was built to be visually engaging for readers, with large photos, pull quotes, and interactive infographics. The full thesis can be found at kuntharathesis.com or http://kuntharathesis.com/index.php/2016/05/05/the-unending-cycle/

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

135031-Thumbnail Image.png

Production's Role in a Journalism Education

Description

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications stands as a "gold standard" of journalism education throughout the country. In my time at the school though, I found that

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications stands as a "gold standard" of journalism education throughout the country. In my time at the school though, I found that some aspects in the whole of the curriculum were missing. I as well as several other friends became interested in production and the technical side of things. This seemed to be the direction we wanted to go and soon realized this played a crucial part in journalism. Although there is a studio production class and a studio production track through the immersive Cronkite News program, there is not much in between. This inspired me to take a look deeper into production skills and their place within a journalism education. The project is split into three main sections that dive into the ideas of teaching production skills and technical skills to journalism students and whether or not it is valuable. The first part is the background of the project and why this project came to be. The background section explores the inspiration for the project. The project continues with a look at job statistics and where the industry currently sits. This continues into the final section that contains personal stories and interviews with professionals in the field. This is a critical section to back up claims made through research and evaluation. There is a lot of personal experience and non-traditional research done through this project, but the assertions and conclusions made are clear. Through job statistics, personal stories, and interviews with professionals, this project examines how production could be taught in a traditional journalism program. These stories show that a journalism curriculum may not be the best place to teach production in depth, but that it still is an incredibly important part of the journalism world as a whole.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12