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Oral Microbiome Analysis Reveals Potential for Streamlining Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Description

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder where the body mistakenly attacks healthy joints. This in turn causes inflammation resulting in pain and swelling. It is very important to get RA accurately diagnosed and treated as early as possible. Similarly,

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder where the body mistakenly attacks healthy joints. This in turn causes inflammation resulting in pain and swelling. It is very important to get RA accurately diagnosed and treated as early as possible. Similarly, with any disease: the longer it is left untreated, the more damage it can cause. RA can cause irreversible joint damage leading to disability. The purpose of this study is to determine if oral microbiome can be used as an additional criterion to aid in diagnosing RA. Several oral microbes have already been identified as biomarkers for RA in saliva. In this study, 10 participants were recruited: 6 diagnosed with RA and 4 Healthy as a control. Two subgroups of RA were done within this study; those diagnose with a positive Rheumatoid Factor (RF) and those diagnose with a negative RF. These subgroups were then compared in order to determine the validity of using certain microbes as biomarkers for RA even when different diagnostic criteria were met. The microbe Parahaemolyticus had the largest measure of effect, showing the greatest potential for statistically significant results with a larger sample size. If we can work narrow to down specific microbes to be undoubtedly higher in abundance with already diagnosed RA patients when comparing to healthy participants, this will be a gamechanger. Not only could we give a higher sense of confidence with the diagnosis of RA, but this could streamline RA diagnosis.

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Date Created
2020-12

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The Association Between Identity and Illness: An Examination of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Adults with an Emphasis on Assigned Sex and Social Factors through Survey Development

Description

With an ever-increasing diagnosis rate and no universal cure, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) lacks conclusive data regarding the onset of its autoimmune response and its preferred relation to assigned sex males. This thesis seeks to analyze the effects that assigned sex

With an ever-increasing diagnosis rate and no universal cure, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) lacks conclusive data regarding the onset of its autoimmune response and its preferred relation to assigned sex males. This thesis seeks to analyze the effects that assigned sex and determinants of health have on EoE diagnosis through previous research and survey development. Upon constructing a Qualtrics survey to collect data patterns and trends of subjects diagnosed with this autoimmune disorder, COVID-19 created a halt in its distribution and data collection. This unexpected event led to the collection and compilation of pre-existing research to be implemented into this thesis as a substitute. The key results of this thesis revealed that in twenty research studies regarding sex differences in EoE, at least 70% of patients diagnosed with EoE were male (Liacouras, 2005). With inconclusive results as to why males are diagnosed at a higher rate, results have not confirmed if this percentage ratio is due to social or genetic factors. To conclude, males are predominately diagnosed with EoE in comparison to the female and intersex population, however, with no data currently available on the effects that EoE has on intersex humans, it cannot be determined what factors create this recurring pattern.

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Date Created
2020-12