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Creating Industry-Based Marketing Materials and Instruments for University Academic Programs

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This thesis explores the task of creating industry-based marketing materials to assist academic programs in their recruitment of high school and community college students. With consistent reductions to public university

This thesis explores the task of creating industry-based marketing materials to assist academic programs in their recruitment of high school and community college students. With consistent reductions to public university budgets there is an increasing pressure on academic programs to raise their student enrollment figures, as student count is often cited as one of the most important statistics when making budget decisions. Many academic programs are ill-equipped to perform this task, however, as their personnel are not trained as recruiters, but rather as professors and industry professionals; furthermore, the university-level recruitment staff faces the impossible task of advertising every department's recruitment message. The Del E. Webb School of Construction has embarked upon a journey to create industry-based marketing materials to aid them in their recruitment efforts. Construction management (CM) has traditionally been viewed as a technology major relegated to vocational students and those not fit for baccalaureate programs. In recent years that perception has changed, however, as the industry has become increasingly complex and CM programs actively work to recruit students. In an attempt to increase that recruitment, the Del E. Webb School has created marketing materials that are signature to the program featuring the world's most widely-used building material, concrete, to create a keepsake for prospective students. This keepsake comes in the form of concrete replicas of the new ASU Pitchfork logo. These pitchforks are small and designed to be mass produced so that they can be handed out at recruitment events either on campus or in local schools. The Del E. Webb School had previously experimented with flexible rubber molds and flowable mixtures, such that the models could be easily cast and rapidly demolded and reset for casting. There were issues, however, as those pitchforks did not meet desired level of quality and were difficult to reproduce. This thesis thus describes an experimental program examining different casting and demolding regimens in an attempt to find the optimal way to create the pitchforks on a consistent basis. Following this, an operations manual for how to create the pitchforks was created in order to ensure that successive cohorts of construction students can reproduce the pitchforks in preparation for the School's annual recruitment events.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05