Matching Items (15)

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ACCULTURATION PROCESS: AN INTERPRETATION OF THE EXPERIENCES OF LIBERIAN IMMIGRANTS IN PHOENIX

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It took the coming together of a community of people and their collective efforts to bring me where I am today academically. I would first like to thank Barrett, especially Dean Ramsey who helped build my appreciation for reading primary

It took the coming together of a community of people and their collective efforts to bring me where I am today academically. I would first like to thank Barrett, especially Dean Ramsey who helped build my appreciation for reading primary text, and NCUIRE for awarding me the grant for this project. I want to extend my gratitude to Dr. Jeffery Kassing for being more than a director for my thesis by patiently listening to me talk about my future aspiration, and Dr. Jim Reed for being a mentor and a second reader. I would also like to thank all the multitude of professors and other mentors who helped shape my perspective in seeing the bigger picture. I am mostly grateful to all those who directly and indirectly helped bring this thesis to realization. Lastly, but certainly not the least, I would like to say a big thank you to my entire family, loved ones, and friends here and back home for enthusiastically cheering me on.

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2015-05

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An Analysis of the Diversity of Chinese Languages in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

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This project analyzes the diversity of the various Chinese languages present in the Phoenix metropolitan area. The diversity and presence of these languages can be used to make inferences about different aspects of the Chinese American community in the Phoenix

This project analyzes the diversity of the various Chinese languages present in the Phoenix metropolitan area. The diversity and presence of these languages can be used to make inferences about different aspects of the Chinese American community in the Phoenix area, and therefore the dialects and compared to other aspects of the Chinese American immigration experience, such as where immigrants are from, what areas of Phoenix they reside, and the Chinese language skills of both the participants and their children. The data is then presented with historical context of the Phoenix Chinese community as well as a brief discussion on the current Chinese community in Phoenix as well as the acculturation of Chinese American children.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Effects of acculturation and gender on Mexican American teens' perceptions of dating violence prevention programs

Description

Dating violence in ethnic minority populations is an understudied phenomenon and little attention has been paid to the experiences of Mexican American youth; less research has been done on how those experiences alter perceptions and acceptance of participation in prevention

Dating violence in ethnic minority populations is an understudied phenomenon and little attention has been paid to the experiences of Mexican American youth; less research has been done on how those experiences alter perceptions and acceptance of participation in prevention programs. This study advances knowledge on how Mexican American adolescents view dating violence prevention programs and how cultural beliefs and values may hinder or encourage effective participation. Focus groups (N = 9) were form with Mexican American youth aged 15-17 years separated by gender and acculturation status (Mexican Oriented/Bicultural/Anglo Oriented), as determined previously by acculturation scores measured by the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans (ARMSA; 0 or below = Mexican Oriented, 0-1 = Bicultural, 1 or above = Anglo Oriented). Several themes emerged throughout the focus group discussions that were derived from culturally-based needs. Mexican American adolescents made recommendations for program development (e.g., a broad curriculum beyond the topic of dating violence) and delivery (e.g., barriers to participation, the implications of peer involvement) within the context of their cultural values and needs. Low acculturated and bicultural teens identified specific cultural needs and their relevance within a dating violence prevention program. However, across all groups, adolescents felt that the needs of Mexican American youth were similar to other youth in regards to dating violence prevention programs. Implications for how social work can best design and implement prevention programs for Mexican American adolescents are discussed.

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Date Created
2011

Ethnic, Familial, and Cultural Barriers Impacting non-White Representation in Environmental Programs

Description

Non-White minorities represent nearly half of the US population and strongly support environmental protection but are severely underrepresented in environmental careers and natural resource-related degree programs. What factors contribute to this disparity in environment career choice? Previous research has indicated

Non-White minorities represent nearly half of the US population and strongly support environmental protection but are severely underrepresented in environmental careers and natural resource-related degree programs. What factors contribute to this disparity in environment career choice? Previous research has indicated that students career decisions are influenced by family and culture as they related to self-efficacy beliefs and outcome expectations towards different occupation choices. In this paper, I explored the importance of familial and cultural factors in career choice decisions to understand the motivations of non-White minority students to enter and remain in college degree programs within environmental disciplines. I surveyed 122 students enrolled in both environmental and non-environmental degree programs at Arizona State University. I measured family and cultural influence using the “Family Influence Scale” and “Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale” respectively. I hypothesized that non-White students in environmental degree programs are influenced less by their families and are more acculturated to the dominant Anglo culture compared to non-White students in non-environmental degree programs. I found no significant relationship between ethnicity, family influence, or acculturation on the degree choices of students. Interestingly, family influence on students’ career decisions was most influenced by home language, household income, and acculturation to the dominant culture. Students more acculturated to Anglo culture reported higher familial influence. Higher income and non-English speaking households also reported higher levels of family influence. Acculturation and language in particular are interesting factors related to family influence and warrant further analysis especially in relation to non-White student participation in environmental careers.

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Date Created
2020-05

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The Assimilation of International Baseball Players into Major League Baseball

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This thesis takes a look how international baseball players are assimilated into Major League Baseball. It discusses the struggles they face in assimilating and what resources teams, in particular the Arizona Diamondbacks, provide these players with to aid in their

This thesis takes a look how international baseball players are assimilated into Major League Baseball. It discusses the struggles they face in assimilating and what resources teams, in particular the Arizona Diamondbacks, provide these players with to aid in their acculturation, before concluding with four proposals to improve the assimilation process for these international players.

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Created

Date Created
2020-12

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The full spectrum: Hispanic understanding of autism in Southern Arizona

Description

The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge and attitudes about autism spectrum disorders among Hispanics in the Southwest. The study will also examine perceived barriers in obtaining resources and preferences in accessing health care. Participants (N =

The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge and attitudes about autism spectrum disorders among Hispanics in the Southwest. The study will also examine perceived barriers in obtaining resources and preferences in accessing health care. Participants (N = 169) were surveyed using the Autism Awareness Survey, which was developed specifically for this research. Significant differences were found between individuals with high acculturation and low acculturation in exposure to autism, knowledge about autism, perceived barriers to obtaining resources and health care, and attitudes towards people with autism. Additionally, the findings also suggest that although the surveyed population was knowledgeable about the symptoms associated with autism, less well known is the etiology and course of the disorder. The research underscores the serious need for both Spanish educational resources and Spanish-speaking health care providers to address the needs of Hispanics with regards to autism, especially with individuals with low levels of acculturation.

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Created

Date Created
2012

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Mediators and moderators of the gender role-substance use relationship in Mexican American adolescents

Description

ABSTRACT The relationships between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of gender roles in predicting substance use were examined in a sample of 955 (450 boys, 505 girls) Mexican American 7th and 8th grade adolescents participating in a school-based substance use intervention.

ABSTRACT The relationships between adaptive and maladaptive aspects of gender roles in predicting substance use were examined in a sample of 955 (450 boys, 505 girls) Mexican American 7th and 8th grade adolescents participating in a school-based substance use intervention. The moderating effect of linguistic acculturation, the mediating effects of antisociality, depressive symptoms, and adaptive and avoidant coping on gender role-substance use relationships were examined. Correlational and path analyses supported the Functional Model of Gender Roles that considers these roles as adaptive or maladaptive social coping strategies. For boys, the path analyses yielded significant direct paths from aggressive masculinity to composite alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use measures, with all other effects of gender roles on substance use operating through the mediators. Bootstrapped mediation tests yielded significant indirect paths, where for boys the positive relationships between assertive and aggressive masculinity with substance use and the negative relationship of affective femininity with substance use were mediated through antisociality, which is predictive of increased substance use. For girls, the positive relationship between aggressive masculinity with cigarette and alcohol use and the negative relationship of affective femininity with alcohol and cigarette use were also mediated by adaptive coping, which is predictive of decreased substance use. A different set of significant indirect paths through avoidant coping connected assertive masculinity and submissive femininity to alcohol use for boys. For boys, the paths from affective femininity to antisociality and adaptive coping were found to be moderated by linguistic acculturation, with the negative correlation of affective femininity with antisociality and positive correlation of this gender role with adaptive coping being stronger in boys low in acculturation. In turn, the pathway from this acculturation by affective femininity interaction to substance use was found to be mediated by antisociality. The present analyses confirmed the importance of gender roles and their interaction with acculturation in predicting substance use in Mexican American adolescents. The analyses also were important in delineating functional mechanisms through which these gender roles have their effects, with implications for the design of interventions to reduce substance use in this population.

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Created

Date Created
2012

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Being bien educado in the United States: Mexican mother's childrearing beliefs and practices in the context of immigration

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This multiple case study examined Mexican mothers' beliefs on social and moral development in light of their adaptation to the United States. Super and Harkness' (1986, 2002) ecocultural framework and more specifically, the concept of the developmental niche, guided the

This multiple case study examined Mexican mothers' beliefs on social and moral development in light of their adaptation to the United States. Super and Harkness' (1986, 2002) ecocultural framework and more specifically, the concept of the developmental niche, guided the analysis. Participants were five Mexican immigrant mothers living in the Phoenix metropolitan area with children between three and four years old. Using participant observation, mothers were shadowed during the day for a period of nine months and were interviewed four times. Additionally, a Q-sort activity on cultural values and a vignette activity were conducted. Evidence of continuity in the importance given to traditional beliefs such as being "bien educado" (proper demeanor) and showing "respeto" (respect) was found. However, the continuity on the teaching of cultural values was accompanied by changes in beliefs and practices. The traditional construct of a "chipil child" (a needy, whiny child) was connected to the idea that mothers somehow need to restrict how much affection, time and gifts they give to their children. This concern was in turn related to the higher access to consumption goods in the United States. It is argued that acculturation is lived differently by mothers, according to their educational attainment, use of expert advice and contact and knowledge with American mainstream culture.

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Date Created
2012

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Group identity and expressions of prejudice among Mexican heritage adolescents

Description

A study was conducted to assess the effects of generational status on various measures of stigmatization, acculturative stress, and perceived social and interpersonal threat within the Mexican heritage population in the Southwest. The role of the fear of stigma by

A study was conducted to assess the effects of generational status on various measures of stigmatization, acculturative stress, and perceived social and interpersonal threat within the Mexican heritage population in the Southwest. The role of the fear of stigma by association, regardless of actual experiences of stigmatization, was investigated, including its relationships with acculturative stress, perceived threat, and social distancing. Exploratory analyses indicated that first generation Mexican Americans differed significantly from second generation Mexican Americans on the perception of Mexican nationals as ingroup members, the fear of stigma by association by Americans, and levels of acculturative stress. Additional analyses indicated that Mexican Americans with one parent born in Mexico and one in the United States held opinions and attitudes most similar to second generation Mexican Americans. Results from path analyses indicated that first-generation Mexican Americans were more likely than second-generation Mexican Americans to both see Mexican nationals as ingroup members and to be afraid of being stigmatized for their perceived association with them. Further, seeing Mexican nationals as in-group members resulted in less social distancing and lower perceived threat, but fear of stigma by association lead to greater perceived threat and greater acculturative stress. Implications for within- and between-group relations and research on stigma by association are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
2010

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Acculturation gap, family conflict and well-being for young adults in Asian American families

Description

The relationship between parent and child acculturation gaps and the child's well-being for Asian American families, with the child's perceived family conflict as a potential mediating variable were examined in this study. In addition to linear relationships of acculturation gaps,

The relationship between parent and child acculturation gaps and the child's well-being for Asian American families, with the child's perceived family conflict as a potential mediating variable were examined in this study. In addition to linear relationships of acculturation gaps, curvilinear relationships were also examined. The sample consisted of 165 first or second generation Asian Americans, aged between 18 to 22. Results indicated that native culture gap is predictive of participants' self-report of depression, and family conflict did function as a mediator to the relationship between native culture gap and depression. The curvilinear relationship between acculturation gaps and well-being was not supported by the results of the study. Further implications and future directions are discussed.

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Date Created
2015