Matching Items (13)

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Diana Holladay: Remembering An Artist

Description

Diana Holladay was a mother, sister, daughter, wife, grandmother, friend, and artist. She played many roles and impacted many lives. She sought out beauty and brought it into the world

Diana Holladay was a mother, sister, daughter, wife, grandmother, friend, and artist. She played many roles and impacted many lives. She sought out beauty and brought it into the world through her art. When she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease her family watched her fade away. The Diana they knew and loved was no longer there. They could not mourn the loss of her being. This creative project served the purpose of exploring Diana’s past and art in order to help her family mourn and celebrate the woman she once was. The goal was to create a final art show and living memorial for Diana. The final art show would foster a sense of family, appreciation, and love. She had hundreds, if not thousands of sketches and pictures. She had a huge collection of painting left behind. During this project they were collected and organized for the show. Diana died exactly one month before the show. Her death brought her family together and helped them mourn. The art show was held in the Sedona Art Center where Diana once held art classes and her husband, Jim, layed the sandstone on the outside of the building. After her death, the attendance of her show nearly tripled. Hundreds of Diana’s family and friends celebrated this amazing woman. This creative project helped honor an incredible woman who truly changed lives and lead her life with love. This thesis helped us remember the woman and artist Diana Holladay was before her diagnosis and death. The final creation of this project was a website dedicated to Diana and her art and an essay describing the journey of this thesis.
www.dianaholladay.com

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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A Guiding Hand: Grief Response in Young Adults

Description

A Guiding Hand: Grief Response in Young Adults works to guide young adults thought the grieving process after the traumatic death of a loved one. It goes through the steps

A Guiding Hand: Grief Response in Young Adults works to guide young adults thought the grieving process after the traumatic death of a loved one. It goes through the steps of grieving and what a person can expect when they suddenly lose someone dear. Written from the point of view of someone who had lost their best friend in a murder/suicide, A Guiding Hand, shares a personal view that is often missing in other books on grief. This piece works to prepare other young adults for the unexpected emotions that are associated with grief. It also works to provide coping strategies to help recover from a traumatic loss in a healthy manner and to put people in touch with resources they may not know exist in order to help with healing.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Death behind bars: Exploring the need for prison hospice programs in the US

Description

The purpose of this project is to explore the historical context and current state of prison hospice programs in the US. This objective was accomplished through an extensive review and

The purpose of this project is to explore the historical context and current state of prison hospice programs in the US. This objective was accomplished through an extensive review and synthesis of the relevant literature pertaining to prison hospice programs in the US. The historical increase of the incarceration rate beginning in America during the 1980’s has led to the development of more elderly prisoners than ever before in the US. As prisoners age in the US correctional system, they experience faster-than-average health decline. Mass incarceration has placed incredible strain on the correctional system to provide healthcare to the medically complex elderly inmate population. This project proposes that some of this systematic strain may be alleviated through the action of prison hospice programs. Prison hospices replace unnecessary industrial medical interventions with personalized comfort care measures and the unique service of inmate volunteers. This approach to medical care at the end of life has become the standard of care for the free population but is slower to emerge in the prison context. This project asserts that the dying US inmate population should be offered the right to a dignified death through equitable access to hospice services.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Watching Strangers Die

Description

This long form creative nonfiction essay gives insider details on working in an emergency room as a medical scribe. The most pertinent topic is death and how the author copes

This long form creative nonfiction essay gives insider details on working in an emergency room as a medical scribe. The most pertinent topic is death and how the author copes with seeing patients die on a regular basis. Other topics are emergency room procedures, specific diagnoses and treatments, as well information on the other personnel in an emergency room.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The Foundations for Perceptions of Death in the Modern United States

Description

American discomfort with death has hindered important end of life conversations within families. The groundwork for this discomfort can be attributed to a variety of influences common in American life.

American discomfort with death has hindered important end of life conversations within families. The groundwork for this discomfort can be attributed to a variety of influences common in American life. This thesis investigates the influence of religion, media portrayal, and healthcare on the perception of death in the United States and offers death mindfulness as a means for the average American to become more comfortable with death.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Death, Delight, and Destitution: What Sort of Epicurean was Palladas of Alexandria?

Description

Within the vast array of classical literature, many authors still have not been thoroughly examined. Among these, Palladas of Alexandria, a prominent epigrammatist in the Palatine Anthology, seems to import

Within the vast array of classical literature, many authors still have not been thoroughly examined. Among these, Palladas of Alexandria, a prominent epigrammatist in the Palatine Anthology, seems to import Epicurean themes. Based on the content and motifs of his poetry, I argue that Palladas leaned on Epicurean philosophy as presented in Lucretius's De Rerum Natura to salvage pagan identity in the midst of Christianity's increased popularity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The End of Life Ritual

Description

"Memento mori- remember you must die." Death is not a simple topic for anyone to address, especially when they are already grieving the loss of a loved one or the

"Memento mori- remember you must die." Death is not a simple topic for anyone to address, especially when they are already grieving the loss of a loved one or the realization that they too will die one day. Death and the practice of death rituals are things that all humans have in common, but at the same time they are something that we will all go through alone and all perceive differently. It can be extremely isolating and painful to grieve or to confront the reality of our own life ending, but it is something that many of us must face. Rituals are what give us the ability to reflect and work through difficult emotions and the ritual created through this project is no different.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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I have to go on: the effect of a mother's death on her daughter's education

Description

Parents die during the lives of their children. If the child is an adolescent, that death will impact the student's education immediately or in subsequent years. Findings show the death

Parents die during the lives of their children. If the child is an adolescent, that death will impact the student's education immediately or in subsequent years. Findings show the death of a mother does impact the daughter's education. It is imperative educators are willing to work with the student at the time the death occurs as well as in the ensuing months. Seidman's (2006) three-interview format was used as a template for the interviews of 11 women, ranging in age from 19 to 78 and whose mothers died when the women were adolescents. The interviews were primarily conducted in one sitting, transcribed, and then analyzed for common themes that connected to the research on the topic. Those themes include grieving, the role of caring in education, the role of teacher as the second mother, mother-daughter relationships, and the impact of parent death on schooling. These themes from the data cross cut with thematic strands within the study's theoretical framework: the nurturing and empathetic role of the mother, a desire of the daughter not to be different, and the ethics of caring. Findings in this study reveal that the negative impacts of mother loss are felt in diffuse ways, such as a lack of academic or emotional encouragement. Many women discussed the need and availability of support groups including groups at colleges. One practical implication of these findings is schools need to become caring communities in which caring is the norm for all students and teachers, thereby providing all students with needed support in times of crisis. The implications for further research include the impact of the mother death on the education of daughters, how volunteering with an organization related to the cause of the mother's death assists the daughter and types of programs most important to a student's success in post-secondary education. Adolescents are in a time of great change in their lives, and for a daughter, the loss of a mother has an everlasting, life-changing impact.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Drink of me, and you shall have eternal life: an analysis of Lord Byron's The Giaour and the Greek folkloric vampire

Description

This paper contains an examination of the impact of the Vampire Hysteria in Europe during the 1700’s on Lord Byron's “The Giaour.” Byron traveled to the continent in 1809

This paper contains an examination of the impact of the Vampire Hysteria in Europe during the 1700’s on Lord Byron's “The Giaour.” Byron traveled to the continent in 1809 and wrote the poems that came to be known as his Oriental Romances after overhearing what would become “The Giaour ” in “ one of the many coffee-houses that abound in the Levant.” The main character, the Giaour, has characteristics typical of the Greek vampire, called vrykolakas. The vamping of characters, the cyclic imagery, and the juxtaposition of life and death as it is expressed within the poem are analyzed in comparison to vampiric folklore, especially that of Greece.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010