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The Narratives of the Women's March

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This study looked at the Women's March's use of social media to communicate their organization's mission. Data was collected from their official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. Facebook posts were collected manually, Twitter data was collected with a Google Sheets

This study looked at the Women's March's use of social media to communicate their organization's mission. Data was collected from their official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. Facebook posts were collected manually, Twitter data was collected with a Google Sheets add-on and Instagram was collected by Picodash. All the posts were shifted through multiple times to identify the key narratives of the Women's March. These narratives were then compared to the stated "Unity Principles" of the organization to see if they aligned with what the Women's March attempted to fight for. The five narratives were "everyone should have access to affordable health care," "women should have access to positions of power and be respected," "immigrants should be welcomed within the United States," "society will be stronger if it addresses issues intersectionally," and "everyone should be safe in the world and treated as equals." Analysis showed that each of these narratives reflected the "Unity Principles" in some form. While certain narratives were related to more principles than others, it does not diminish the importance of each message.

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2018-05

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#DeleteYourAccount: An Analysis of Online Harassment Toward Celebrities

Description

The introduction of this thesis explains that, though celebrity culture is a pre-existing phenomenon, the digital age has posed new, dehumanizing challenges for physically unattainable famous figures. Some people feel a stronger sense of love for celebrities, believing that the

The introduction of this thesis explains that, though celebrity culture is a pre-existing phenomenon, the digital age has posed new, dehumanizing challenges for physically unattainable famous figures. Some people feel a stronger sense of love for celebrities, believing that the Internet connects them on a deeper, personal level, whereas others participate in increasing hate and decreasing fear of consequence of online behavior. The main goals of this project were to analyze in what ways online harassment toward celebrities differs according to gender, as well as what types of online harassment celebrities face on social media platforms.

Social media posts included in the discussion were taken from Twitter and explored using the qualitative research-based Grounded Theory. Four celebrities were selected as case studies to illustrate hate that popular music artists receive. These celebrities were Justin Bieber, Shawn Mendes, Taylor Swift and Ariana Grande. Before the data collection process transitioned to Twitter for specific examples, Google Search was effective in providing background information on each celebrity's controversies. With open coding as the chosen stage of data analysis, tweets were grouped with those containing similar content (e.g. two tweets using the same insult).

Social media users can uncover problematic tweets and refuse to forgive celebrities for past mistakes, send threatening messages that encourage celebrities to kill themselves, shame celebrities for their physical appearances and sexualities and so forth. All of these concepts are observed within the respective literature review and discussion sections. The types of online harassment included are insults, devotion defending, threats and hacking.

The gathered data found that difference in the online harassment that female pop stars receive versus that toward male pop stars often lies in how people perceive their sexualities and physical appearances, as well as the distance perceived between the social media user and the celebrity. In the examples provided, women were regarded as “whores” for wearing certain clothing and blamed for issues in their relationships, whereas men were not seen as the problem and criticized for appearing too "feminine."

It is recommended that people become more aware of the consequences of online harassment in general, but particularly toward celebrities who are viewed as being unaffected by hate comments. Due to the limitations of this study, future research within this area should include people of color and various sectors of the entertainment industry.

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2019-12

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Analyzing the Brand Personalities and Social Media Practices of College Athletic Twitter Accounts

Description

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media practices on Twitter. The author conducted a content analysis of

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media practices on Twitter. The author conducted a content analysis of each school's tweets to measure brand personality and scraped data in order to collect social media practice information. Results suggest that brand personality and social media practices are distinct. Extraversion was the most common personality type among all schools. In addition, schools that tweeted less frequently than others exhibited more brand personality and used more visual media.

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2018-05

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Social Media: A Case Study in Socially Connected Entrepreneurs

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The purpose of this study is to examine how social connectivity in a collaborative business environment translates to online social communication, namely to social media. Not a lot of academic research focuses in-depth on how startups and entrepreneurs within the

The purpose of this study is to examine how social connectivity in a collaborative business environment translates to online social communication, namely to social media. Not a lot of academic research focuses in-depth on how startups and entrepreneurs within the technology industry perceive social media, or how their work environment can influence the ways they see the role of these platforms. Gangplank was chosen as the subject of this case study based on the emphasis they as a coworking space put on connecting to others in order to accomplish mutual goals. Initial research showed that entrepreneurs using social media did so with a collaborative focus in mind. However, it was unclear if, by developing their businesses in a space devoted to fostering social relationships, entrepreneurs would be more likely to engage and interact with other users on social media platforms. Furthermore, it was unclear if their attitudes toward online and offline communication would be affected by spending time in a dedicated social workspace. In order to find how some entrepreneurs that started or worked closely in the beginning stages of a collaborative, connection-driven workspace used social media and see whether or not they used the platform to establish and build relationships and connect with others, three entrepreneurs from such a workspace were personally interviewed. In these interviews, each entrepreneur gave their personal feelings and opinions on the space itself, their view on the role of social media, and whether or not they connected their space to their social media use. The study also examined each entrepreneur's social media profile on one prominent social network to see how each was practically using the platform, and to analyze how each entrepreneur's use of the platform compared to his perceptions of social media as a whole. The study found that entrepreneurs who became established in a collaboration-oriented space definitely interacted frequently on social media. Each entrepreneur interviewed expressed the importance of working closely with others and forming valuable connections through both online and offline means. These entrepreneurs were established to have followed all the best practices of social media use outlined through research, and to have had a large number of personally engaging interactions and conversations on observed social media platforms.

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Date Created
2015-12

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Social Media and Public Relations: A Qualitative Analysis of Practitioners' Usage, Perceptions and Measurement

Description

A qualitative analysis that compares the social media usage, perceptions and measurement tools of public relations practitioners across a variety of industries.

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2014-05

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Proactivity in Preventing Online Crises in the Social Media Age: How Workplace Diversity Shields Organizations from Self-Inflicted Crisis

Description

Self-inflicted online crises arise when a company releases materials, such as advertisements or products, that are offensive to stakeholders and consequently cause a negative reaction across online communities. This thesis examines how companies have tried to restore their image after

Self-inflicted online crises arise when a company releases materials, such as advertisements or products, that are offensive to stakeholders and consequently cause a negative reaction across online communities. This thesis examines how companies have tried to restore their image after a self-inflicted crisis arose that spoke to a lack of cultural sensitivity and understanding within the organization. Models of crisis communication were analyzed to determine that a crisis has trigger events that can be detected and prevented against. Research on diversity in the workplace and the benefits of fostering a culturally sensitive and aware workplace environment was also analyzed. Finally, image restoration strategies were examined to comprehend how companies use messaging to mitigate crises. From there, three case studies were conducted on three separate self-inflicted online crises that arose from an apparent lack of culturally sensitivity and understanding within an organization, each instance occurring within the past two years. This study then provided an analysis of the background, description, online reaction and company response to each: the PepsiCo advertisement featuring Kendall Jenner, the Gucci sweater appearing to resemble blackface and the Tarte Cosmetics Shape Tape Foundation launch. Image restoration strategies were then identified and analyzed for each case study. Metrics were determined for each case by looking at the reach of posts on social media and also by using Google Trends and Meltwater to discover the extent of media engagement during the length of each crisis. The events explored in each case study all demonstrated an oversight in the pre-crisis stage of each of the organizations, emphasizing the necessity of detection in crisis management planning as a tactic to actively identify potential threats before a triggering event can occur.

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Date Created
2019-05

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ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL MEDIA POLICIES: THE NEW YORK TIMES AND HURRICANE SANDY

Description

This project is a case study of the how The New York Times metro desk and its journalists used Twitter throughout the duration of Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy affected the East Coast of the United States in late October and

This project is a case study of the how The New York Times metro desk and its journalists used Twitter throughout the duration of Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy affected the East Coast of the United States in late October and early November 2012. The study specifically focuses on a random sampling of journalists' individual Twitter accounts as listed on the Times website directory and the official New York Times Metro account, which tweets breaking news in the New York City metro area of five New York City boroughs and New Jersey. This study categorizes the tweets according to types of tweet, with regard to whether individual tweets were "retweets" (reposting of another Twitter user's tweet) as well as the tweet's contents by categories relevant to the storm. This case study utilizes a qualitative approach. The categories were determined based on theme as a contextual analysis to synthesize information more broadly to be more inclusive of tweets occurring during the time frame of October 27 to November 3, 2012. The study then analyzes the tweets through the lens of the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics, a code voluntarily embraced by thousands of journalists as a guideline for ethical behavior in the profession, and the New York Times informal guidelines for its journalists' social media use. The study seeks to explore the ethical implications of Twitter's use during breaking news and how the message is delivered can be framed by as a tweet or retweet rather than shared through traditional journalism methods (via print or a news organization's website.)

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Date Created
2013-05

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It "breaks down this wall: dualities in journalists' engagement with Twitter followers

Description

Scholars have identified that journalists have a strong occupational identity, leading to ideological conceptions of the rules of the field. However, while journalists are often the first to embrace technological change, they often do so in different ways than most

Scholars have identified that journalists have a strong occupational identity, leading to ideological conceptions of the rules of the field. However, while journalists are often the first to embrace technological change, they often do so in different ways than most people. With the arrival of digital technologies, journalists are often faced with practices that run contrary to long-established ideology, and they often carry traditional practices over to new media. Using the theoretical lens of Giddens’s structuration theory, this research identifies traditional journalism structures that encourage or discourage journalists to interact with their followers on the social network Twitter. Using constant comparative analysis to interpret 23 interviews with contemporary journalists, this study identified multiple dualities between the use of Twitter and traditional newsgathering. It also recognized a cognitive dissonance among journalists who use Twitter. Though they can see advantages to using the platform to engage with followers, particularly other journalists and members of their audience, journalists do not seek out Twitter interaction and often avoid or resist it. Finally, this dissertation suggests three walls that block journalists from engaging in the Internet’s facilitation of personal connectivity, engagement, and a true community forum with followers. Although a wall of objectivity has somewhat been broached by Twitter use, walls of storytelling and routine and traditional news values continue to hold strong.

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Date Created
2015