Matching Items (5)

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Emergence of Self: An Exploration of Nonbinary Gender

Description

Through artist book, printed photographs, paintings, writing, and web design, August Tang deconstructed their identity as a nonbinary person. Both educational and expressive, the creative project was a manifestation of a coming out journey, affirmation of gender identity, and experiences relating to gender with friends, family, and strangers.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

LGBTQ+ Representation in Fictional Podcast Series

Description

This article offers an in-depth analysis of the frequency and quality of LGBTQ+ representation in fictional podcasts. Specifically, I examine how frequently and with what intent LGBTQ+ characters are included in fictional podcast series. Though scholars have studied LGBTQ+ representation

This article offers an in-depth analysis of the frequency and quality of LGBTQ+ representation in fictional podcasts. Specifically, I examine how frequently and with what intent LGBTQ+ characters are included in fictional podcast series. Though scholars have studied LGBTQ+ representation in different media, there has been almost no research on representation in fictional podcast series. However, as observed in other studies, cable and network television, streaming, and even blockbuster cinema have been slowly increasing in LGBTQ+ diversity (Stokes 2019, Cook 2018). Nevertheless, LGBTQ+ media consumers, especially LGBTQ+ youth, still find themselves underrepresented and look to other sources for validation of their identities (Stokes 2019). We might expect that many LGBTQ+ people may look to fictional podcasts as a possible source of quality representation, especially because podcasts are small-scale and heavily rely on the funding, and thus the opinion, of listeners (Bottomley, 2015). This is a case study in which four fictional podcast series are analyzed for LGBTQ+ inclusivity by first taking into account how many, and in what proportion, LGBTQ+ characters are included in the selected podcasts. The quality of their representation was then evaluated by a number of factors, including diversity, depth, and the frequency and type of stereotypical LGBTQ+ tropes. My findings show a higher frequency of LGBTQ+ characters than in more mainstream media. Further, the studied fictional podcasts series featured LGBTQ+ characters with diverse personalities and backgrounds, LGBTQ+ trope subversions, opportunities to express their sexual and/or gender identities, and long story arcs that do not end in their misfortune. Therefore, we see that fictional podcasts, as a medium that sustains itself primarily on listeners’ patronage, trend towards presenting stories that their audience can relate to (Bottomley, 2015). As a result, fictional podcasts tend to create more niche stories with the intention of making a connection with a smaller demographic of media consumers.

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Created

Date Created
2020-12

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Online Social Connectedness, Resilience, and Well-Being Among Sexual Minorities: The Mediating Roles of Compulsory Heterosexuality and Internalized Heterosexism

Description

Sexual minorities use social media platforms at higher rates than heterosexual individuals, often to find and connect with other sexual minorities and the broader online LGBTQ+ community. These online connections may help normalize feelings and experiences as a sexual minority

Sexual minorities use social media platforms at higher rates than heterosexual individuals, often to find and connect with other sexual minorities and the broader online LGBTQ+ community. These online connections may help normalize feelings and experiences as a sexual minority in a heterosexual-normed society by increasing exposure to more meaningful reference groups and helping to mitigate the negative impact of heterosexist norms. There has been relatively little research investigating online social connectedness (OSC) among sexual minority adults, the relation between OSC and positive psychological outcomes, and the role of OSC in lessening the impact of heterosexist norms. The goal of the present thesis was to examine the relation between OSC and positive psychological outcomes, and whether such a relation is mediated by compulsory heterosexuality (CH; i.e., heterosexist norms) and internalized heterosexism (IH; i.e., internalizing and accepting heterosexist norms). A sample of 298 sexual minority adults in the U.S. completed an online survey that included measures of OSC, CH, IH, and positive psychological outcomes including resilience, well-being, self-acceptance, and self-esteem. The hypothesized model, with CH and IH as serial mediators of the relation between OSC and positive psychological outcomes, along with a series of alternative models, were tested using structural equation modeling. Support was found for the hypothesized model, such that greater OSC predicted lower CH, which then predicted lower IH, which in turn predicted greater positive psychological outcomes. While several alternative models had adequate fit, the hypothesized model was best supported statistically and by previous literature. These findings provide insights into the psychological benefits of social media connections for sexual minorities and the potential for OSC to lessen the impact of heterosexist norms. This study also adds to the existing literature regarding OSC and sexual minority adults, expanding the literature from primarily focusing on sexual minority youth. Future studies should be more socio-demographically diverse and longitudinal in nature in order to help better understand the directionality of the relationship between CH and IH. The present findings may also inform the development of interventions aimed at decreasing CH and IH, which future studies should investigate more fully.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

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Applying a Black Queer Feminist Mental Health Framework to Explore the Experiences of Black Queer Women and Nonbinary People Living with Mental Distress

Description

Black queer women and nonbinary people (BQWNB) living with mental distress are an important sub-group in the Black community in need of greater attention in mental health research. However, the majority of health research about the Black community focuses on

Black queer women and nonbinary people (BQWNB) living with mental distress are an important sub-group in the Black community in need of greater attention in mental health research. However, the majority of health research about the Black community focuses on Black cisgender men who have sex with men and people who have or are at risk of having HIV/AIDS. To expand the knowledge about BQWNB, I applied critical and transformative approaches to understand mental distress. Using a Black queer feminist mental health framework and transformative healing justice lens, this phenomenological qualitative study set out to explore and describe how BQWNB living with mental distress navigated their mental health and wellbeing with a sample of 17 participants. Data were collected using one-on-one audio-recorded semi-structured interviews. There were three major findings that emerged from participants’ narratives: (1) contributors to mental distress, (2) impacts of mental distress, and (3) positive responses to mental distress. Contributors to mental distress included individual and collective trauma experiences, embodying strength and independence, and experiencing stereotypes about their sexual and multiracial identities. The impact of mental distress resulted in lowered quality of life and reported self-harmful thoughts and behaviors. Finally, positive responses to mental distress included body, mind, and spirit and community-centered responses as well as resistance to cultural norms and expectations and non-disclosure as a form of self-preservation. These findings led to an integrative (not) being-in-distress framework and a new critical approach to mental health and healing that informed anti-oppressive social work research, practice, and education.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

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Examining the Moderating Role of Own and Family Religiosity on the Relations Between Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms in Sexual Minority Latinx Youth

Description

Relative to their heterosexual peers, sexual minority youth experience significant mental health disparities. This, in part, is due to prejudicial encounters (e.g., discrimination, victimization) because of their sexual minority status, and potential compounding stressors from prejudicial experiences related to their

Relative to their heterosexual peers, sexual minority youth experience significant mental health disparities. This, in part, is due to prejudicial encounters (e.g., discrimination, victimization) because of their sexual minority status, and potential compounding stressors from prejudicial experiences related to their ethnic minority status, which could lead to worse mental health outcomes due to intersecting minority stress processes. Surprisingly, even though religiosity has been identified as a protective factor in the general literature for adolescents and young adults, few studies have examined whether religiosity serves as a potential buffer of the relations between stress and mental health outcomes in sexual minority Latinx youth. Thus, the goals of this study were to examine: (1) whether ethnic discrimination and sexuality discrimination have additive or interactive effects on depressive symptoms, and (2) whether self or family religiosity moderate the relations between discrimination and depressive symptoms, in a sample of 377 sexual minority Latinx youth (Mage = 20.29, SD = 2.61, age range 14-24). Results showed that there was no interactive effect between ethnic discrimination and sexuality discrimination in predicting depressive symptoms. There was a significant interaction between own religiosity and sexuality discrimination in predicting depressive symptoms, in which own religiosity was negatively associated with depressive symptoms only at low level of sexuality discrimination. No significant interaction emerged between own religiosity and ethnic discrimination. Finally, there were significant interactive effects between family religiosity and discrimination (ethnic and sexuality), in which family religiosity was negatively associated with depressive symptoms only at average and low level of discrimination. These findings highlight the importance of examining the intersection of religion, sexuality, and Latinx minority status in relation to mental health outcome.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020