Matching Items (8)

Investigating Telehealth in the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Scoping Review

Description

The COVID-19 pandemic places significant strain on the U.S. healthcare system due to the high number of coronavirus cases. During the pandemic, there was much unknown about the virus, its

The COVID-19 pandemic places significant strain on the U.S. healthcare system due to the high number of coronavirus cases. During the pandemic, there was much unknown about the virus, its course of the disease, COVID-19 diagnosis, treatments, or other imperative information needed to contain the virus. Resources within the healthcare system, such as PPE and healthcare workers, were in short supply and exacerbated the difficulty of managing the viral outbreak. Peer-reviewed articles suggest that telehealth, the application of electronic information and telecommunication technologies in healthcare, proved useful in public health and clinical care during the 2020 public health emergency due to a novel virus. The scoping review broadly assessed themes of telehealth’s strengths and weaknesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings could suggest how virtual medicine may be a helpful tool to improve access in addition to the quality of care in the future of medicine. Assessments of case studies suggest that telehealth helped provide care to large patient volumes by aiding with communication, data collection, triage, remote patient monitoring, and critical care. Limitations of expanding telehealth subsequent to the pandemic include, but not limited to, a lack of national standards for practice and restrictions of utility for certain populations. Populations may include those with low socioeconomic status, specific cultural practices, and beliefs, or physical and cognitive ability barriers. Outlining the benefits and limitations of telehealth may suggest how virtual medicine can provide valuable in day-to-day medical practices and other pathogenic outbreaks.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Making of a COVID Testing Laboratory: Deconstructing the Saliva Sample Collection Process and Preanalytical Standardization

Description

This thesis project is the result of close collaboration with the Arizona State University Biodesign Clinical Testing Laboratory (ABCTL) to document the characteristics of saliva as a test sample, preanalytical

This thesis project is the result of close collaboration with the Arizona State University Biodesign Clinical Testing Laboratory (ABCTL) to document the characteristics of saliva as a test sample, preanalytical considerations, and how the ABCTL utilized saliva testing to develop swift COVID-19 diagnostic tests for the Arizona community. As of April 2021, there have been over 130 million recorded cases of COVID-19 globally, with the United States taking the lead with approximately 31.5 million cases. Developing highly accurate and timely diagnostics has been an important need of our country that the ABCTL has had tremendous success in delivering. Near the start of the pandemic, the ABCTL utilized saliva as a testing sample rather than nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs that were limited in supply, required highly trained medical personnel, and were generally uncomfortable for participants. Results from literature across the globe showed how saliva performed just as well as the NP swabs (the golden standard) while being an easier test to collect and analyze. Going forward, the ABCTL will continue to develop high quality diagnostic tools and adapt to the ever-evolving needs our communities face regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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How COVID-19 Has Affected the Social and Clinical Practices of Deaf People: A Qualitative Study

Description

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in preventative measures and has led to extensive changes in lifestyle for the vast majority of the American population. As the pandemic progresses, a

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in preventative measures and has led to extensive changes in lifestyle for the vast majority of the American population. As the pandemic progresses, a growing amount of evidence shows that minority groups, such as the Deaf community, are often disproportionately and uniquely affected. Deaf people are directly affected in their ability to personally socialize and continue with daily routines. More specifically, this can constitute their ability to meet new people, connect with friends/family, and to perform in their work or learning environment. It also may result in further mental health changes and an increased reliance on technology. The impact of COVID-19 on the Deaf community in clinical settings must also be considered. This includes changes in policies for in-person interpreters and a rise in telehealth. Often, these effects can be representative of the pre-existing low health literacy, frequency of miscommunication, poor treatment, and the inconvenience felt by Deaf people when trying to access healthcare. Ultimately, these effects on the Deaf community must be taken into account when attempting to create a full picture of the societal shift caused by COVID-19.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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How COVID-19 Has Affected the Social and Clinical Practices of Deaf People: A Qualitative Study

Description

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in preventative measures and has led to extensive changes in lifestyle for the vast majority of the American population. As the pandemic progresses, a

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in preventative measures and has led to extensive changes in lifestyle for the vast majority of the American population. As the pandemic progresses, a growing amount of evidence shows that minority groups, such as the Deaf community, are often disproportionately and uniquely affected. Deaf people are directly affected in their ability to personally socialize and continue with daily routines. More specifically, this can constitute their ability to meet new people, connect with friends/family, and to perform in their work or learning environment. It also may result in further mental health changes and an increased reliance on technology. The impact of COVID-19 on the Deaf community in clinical settings must also be considered. This includes changes in policies for in-person interpreters and a rise in telehealth. Often, these effects can be representative of the pre-existing low health literacy, frequency of miscommunication, poor treatment, and the inconvenience felt by Deaf people when trying to access healthcare. Ultimately, these effects on the Deaf community must be taken into account when attempting to create a full picture of the societal shift caused by COVID-19.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Cultural, Social and Political Factors of the COVID-19 Pandemic in the U.S. and South Korea: Why We Have Failed

Description

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an international impact since the novel coronavirus first surfaced in late 2019. Since then, different countries have taken different approaches to try and limit transmissions

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an international impact since the novel coronavirus first surfaced in late 2019. Since then, different countries have taken different approaches to try and limit transmissions and deaths. While this is seemingly unprecedented in modern day times, many pandemics, or plagues, have happened relatively frequently in history. This paper examines three historical plagues through the lens of social psychologist Geert Hofstede’s six cultural dimensions to distinguish between cultures: power distance, individualism versus collectivism, masculinity versus femininity, uncertainty avoidance, long term orientation and indulgence versus restraint. This paper then applies these dimensions to the modern day U.S. and South Korea, two countries who have had different success in handling the COVID-19 pandemic. Through these dimensions, this paper aims to explain a factor in why South Korea has had better results than the U.S. It also recognizes that Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are not the only factor to affect the pandemic, and explores political influences in America through the lens of Henry David Thoreau and John Dewey. Overall, this paper argues that the U.S. has been unsuccessful in taming the pandemic because of certain cultural dimensions, such as more an individualist and indulgent culture, and its unstable and divisive political climate. Given this, the United States has a hopeful, yet arduous path moving forward with COVID-19 and future pandemics.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Metrics to Compare Arc-based and Node-based Districting Models

Description

The outbreak of the coronavirus has impacted retailers and the food industry after they were forced to switch to delivery services due to social distancing measures. During these times, online

The outbreak of the coronavirus has impacted retailers and the food industry after they were forced to switch to delivery services due to social distancing measures. During these times, online sales and local deliveries started to see an increase in their demand - making these methods the new way of staying in business. For this reason, this research seeks to identify strategies that could be implemented by delivery service companies to improve their operations by comparing two types of p-median models (node-based and edge-based). To simulate demand, geographical data will be analyzed for the cities of San Diego and Paris. The usage of districting models will allow the determination on how balance and compact the service regions are within the districts. After analyzing the variability of each demand simulation run, conclusions will be made on whether one model is better than the other.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

A Virtual Frontier: the Analysis of a New Workforce Entering an Unprecedented Business Landscape

Description

This thesis intends to explore the virtual working environment that this country’s future workforce will encounter, with an emphasis on my experience as a Procurement Financial Analyst Intern at Boeing

This thesis intends to explore the virtual working environment that this country’s future workforce will encounter, with an emphasis on my experience as a Procurement Financial Analyst Intern at Boeing this past summer. The events that have unfolded this year, due to the global reach of the novel CoronaVirus pandemic, have led to an unprecedented change in the way in which a majority of America’s corporations have been forced to operate. Businesses have told their employees to stay home and this has dramatically changed the workforce’s paradigm. The uncertainty of the duration of this new paradigm affects everyone from top-level management in decision making, to global recruitment teams, to college students searching for their first jobs in a worldwide market downturn.

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Date Created
  • 2020-12

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Construction of a Recombinant Coronavirus with Histidine Tagged Envelope (E) Protein

Description

The coronavirus envelope (E) protein is a structural component of all coronavirus. Obtaining purified E protein in an efficient, clean, and reliable manner is needed for ongoing studies. Toward this

The coronavirus envelope (E) protein is a structural component of all coronavirus. Obtaining purified E protein in an efficient, clean, and reliable manner is needed for ongoing studies. Toward this goal the E protein of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) coronavirus was tagged with with either 6 or 10 histidine (his) residues which can be used for affinity chromatography purification. The his-tags were introduced by PCR into a cDNA of the MHV A59 virus strain at the carboxy end of the E gene. A reverse genetics approach was then used to assemble three full-length cDNAs of the viral genome, two modified with the hig-tags and a control wild-type (WT) without a tag . Full-length genomic RNAs were transcribed and electroporated into baby hamster kidney cells that express the MHV receptor (BHKR) and L2 rat lung cells. Virus was recovered after 72 h only from the 6X his-tagged genome and the WT control. Western blotting using antibodies against the E protein or the nucleocapsid (N) protein was performed after cells were infected with the recovered WT and 6X-tagged recombinant viruses. The E protein was not detected with the E antibody, but was detected with a histidine probe was used to detect the histidine residues. This indicates that the tagged protein is expressed and that the tag is present.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05