Matching Items (4)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

134774-Thumbnail Image.png

The Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) into Western Biomedical Oncology Treatment

Description

Through a standpoint feminist perspective (Harding 2009) I conducted a situational analysis (Clarke, 2015) that examined academic literature and cancer support discussion boards (DBs) to identify how Western biomedicine, specifically oncology, can integrate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to improve

Through a standpoint feminist perspective (Harding 2009) I conducted a situational analysis (Clarke, 2015) that examined academic literature and cancer support discussion boards (DBs) to identify how Western biomedicine, specifically oncology, can integrate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to improve cancer treatment in children. The aims of this project were: 1) to identify the CAM treatments that are being used to alleviate the side effects from oncological treatments and/or treat pediatric cancers; 2) to compare the subjective experience of CAM to Western biomedicine of cancer patients who leave comments on Group Loop, Cancer Compass and Cancer Forums, which are online support groups (N=20). I used grounded theory and situational mapping to analyze discussion threads. The participants identified using the following CAM treatments: herbs, imagery, prayer, stinging nettle, meditation, mind-body therapies and supplements. The participants turned to CAM treatments when their cancer was late-stage or terminal, often as an integrative and not exclusively to treat their cancer. CAM was more "effective" than biomedical oncology treatment at improving their overall quality of life and functionality. We found that youth on discussion boards did not discuss CAM treatments like the adult participants, but all participants visited these sites for support and verification of their cancer treatments. My main integration recommendation is to combine mind-body CAM therapies with biomedical treatment. This project fills the gap in literature that ignores the ideas of vulnerable populations by providing the experiences of adult and pediatric cancer patients, and that of their families. It is applicable to areas of the social studies of medicine, patient care, and families suffering from cancer. KEYWORDS: Cancer; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Situational Analysis; Standpoint Feminism

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

164651-Thumbnail Image.png

An Evidence Based Review of the Top Three Essential Oils Used In Complementary Healthcare: Lavender, Peppermint, and Citrus

Description

There are many claims made in the essential oil industry, and not all of them are backed up by a sufficient amount of peer-reviewed research. Thus, the purpose of this thesis project was to sort through the claims made in

There are many claims made in the essential oil industry, and not all of them are backed up by a sufficient amount of peer-reviewed research. Thus, the purpose of this thesis project was to sort through the claims made in the essential oil industry and present an evidence-supported review of the health benefits of lavender, peppermint, and citrus essential oils. Interviews were conducted to compare the literature findings to the knowledge and experiences of individuals using essential oils in their daily lives. Lavender essential oil was shown to improve agitated behavior, fatigue, cardiovascular parameters, sleep quality, anxiety, PONV, and quality of life. Peppermint essential oil was shown to improve cognitive performance, reduce mental fatigue, and reduce PONV and antiemetic drug requirements. Finally, Citrus aurantium can improve anxiety, mental symptoms of PMS, and quality of life, and Citrus sinensis can reduce postoperative abdominal pain. All of these results were achieved in medical settings with low costs, little to no reported side effects, and generally high participant satisfaction with each intervention. By comparing the literature findings to the information collected from interviews with current essential oil users, it can safely be assumed that essential oil practice and research align in many relevant cases. Most notably, lavender essential oil aids in sleep quality and anxiety disorders and peppermint essential oil aids with cognitive function and gastrointestinal concerns.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

165971-Thumbnail Image.png

The Commodification of the Human Body: The Ethical Dilemma of Marketing and Incentives within Organ Transplantation

Description

An increasingly urgent issue in healthcare is the scarcity of available organs for transplant procedures—both live and cadaveric. Recent proposals have pushed for fiscal incentives and a monetary scheme to encourage live donation, specifically for kidney and liver donations. Such

An increasingly urgent issue in healthcare is the scarcity of available organs for transplant procedures—both live and cadaveric. Recent proposals have pushed for fiscal incentives and a monetary scheme to encourage live donation, specifically for kidney and liver donations. Such propositions are inherently unethical, contradicting the three guiding principles of organ donation: utility, justice, and respect for persons. Furthermore, these additional economic elements will perpetuate the exploitation of vulnerable communities. The intersecting low socioeconomic quintile populations are threatened the most by a monetary scheme; their need to better their financial status allows them to be taken advantage of easily by third parties. This instigates a cycle in which the vulnerable individuals who volunteer to donate for compensation are actually pushed deeper into poverty. In advocating for monetization, it would permit the public sale of human organs—the commodification of the human body. Alternative solutions must be considered in which the donors and recipients are treated not as a means, but as an end in themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

166067-Thumbnail Image.png

The Commodification of the Human Body: The Ethical Dilemma of Marketing and Incentives Within Organ Transplantation

Description

An increasingly urgent issue in healthcare is the scarcity of available organs for transplant procedures—both live and cadaveric. Recent proposals have pushed for fiscal incentives and a monetary scheme to encourage live donation, specifically for kidney and liver donations. Such

An increasingly urgent issue in healthcare is the scarcity of available organs for transplant procedures—both live and cadaveric. Recent proposals have pushed for fiscal incentives and a monetary scheme to encourage live donation, specifically for kidney and liver donations. Such propositions are inherently unethical, contradicting the three guiding principles of organ donation: utility, justice, and respect for persons. Furthermore, these additional economic elements will perpetuate the exploitation of vulnerable communities. The intersecting low socioeconomic quintile populations are threatened the most by a monetary scheme; their need to better their financial status allows them to be taken advantage of easily by third parties. This instigates a cycle in which the vulnerable individuals who volunteer to donate for compensation are actually pushed deeper into poverty. In advocating for monetization, it would permit the public sale of human organs—the commodification of the human body. Alternative solutions must be considered in which the donors and recipients are treated not as a means, but as an end in themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05