Matching Items (11)

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The Path to Success and Happiness: A Mindful and Interdependent Endeavor

Description

The purpose of this thesis is to explore the effectiveness of a mindful and interdependent approach to success and happiness. I believe our happiness should be a constant priority of

The purpose of this thesis is to explore the effectiveness of a mindful and interdependent approach to success and happiness. I believe our happiness should be a constant priority of ours. To achieve happiness, I argue that we should always be thoughtfully considering our own perspectives as well as the perspectives of others. I begin by explaining the components of the Happiness Chain, which I've developed through my examination of literature on mindfulness, the treatment of others, positivity, stress, and other interrelated areas. The Happiness Chain starts with an internal analysis of ourselves as individuals. The components of this section include mindfulness, stress, and positivity. The second section of the Happiness Chain deals with how we treat with others. In this section we use what we've learned in the first section to acknowledge how our actions affect the happiness of other people. Ultimately, the emotional state of one individual affects the emotional state of the individuals they interact with, so it is in our best interest to increase the happiness of those around us as well and not just ourselves. I then discuss the importance of the Happiness Chain to the organization by comparing it with emotional intelligence, which is necessary for an effective leader to have. I specifically discuss how each component of the Happiness Chain relates to the five characteristics of emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill. Lastly, I provide specific tools that individuals, managers, or leaders, can use to achieve mindfulness and positivity for themselves and for others for a happier, more successful life overall.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Company Culture in Today's Society

Description

This thesis provides an analysis of company culture in well-known and relevant businesses to identify a successful company culture and create an outline for businesses to follow when designing or

This thesis provides an analysis of company culture in well-known and relevant businesses to identify a successful company culture and create an outline for businesses to follow when designing or revamping their culture. This included research and analysis of successful and unsuccessful company cultures and the affect they have on customers, employees and employers. This analysis created measurements to use to identify good company culture and bad company culture. These were identified through evaluations of employee reviews, secondary research and business articles. From there, different parts of company culture were identified as key components to building a strong, prideful and successful company culture and alternatively, what deteriorates a company culture. As a result of this thesis I uncovered measurements to use to identify a good company culture and six critical success factors to outline a successful company culture that can be tailored to any business. The measurements were surrounding retention rates, innovation, company development, employee perks, a fun atmosphere and an overall attention to employee needs. The critical success factors of company culture are to set the mission and vision of the company, define the company's core values, set a budget for company culture expenses, add special perks or actions that make your culture unique, hire and train right from the start and most importantly follow through. These factors create an outline for how to structure a great company culture, but do not set boundaries for any company. The best company culture is authentic to a company's mission, goals, customers and employees.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

Identifying the Characteristics of Expert Veterinarians Using Information Measurement Theory

Description

The Performance Based Studies Research Group (PBSRG) uses a leading model that helps people and procurement projects alike minimize risk while maximizing productivity. While there are a multitude of factors

The Performance Based Studies Research Group (PBSRG) uses a leading model that helps people and procurement projects alike minimize risk while maximizing productivity. While there are a multitude of factors that propel this model, Information Measurement Theory (IMT) is the main element of the Best Value approach the group takes. I wanted to take the dominant information elements of IMT that helped me find my true self and increase my level of efficiency, and use them to find what it takes to become a successful veterinarian. In order to do this, the Kashiwagi Solution Model (KSM) within IMT was the perfect way to distinguish more successful, higher performing veterinarians from the less successful, lower performing veterinarians. In order to do this, a number of KSM-designed questions were created to score each veterinarian's level of perception. These, along with other background and performance questions, were put into a short survey and sent out. Once this was done, other elements of the veterinarians' lives could be compared side by side to their perception level. The results, of which 970 surveys were returned, found that the more expert a veterinarian is, the lower number of animals they will see per day and the better they know their customer satisfaction rating. These are both then theorized to work in conjunction to form the final correlation that the more perceptive the veterinarian, the higher their performance, aka their clinic's rating. In addition to this, no correlation was found between a veterinarian's level of thinking and their GPA from graduate school. It was concluded that though these correlations are found, I would recommend another project to be done in which all veterinarians of each surveyed clinic could be analyzed in order to gain more insight into any trends that exist between a veterinarian's level of thinking and their performance.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Latina Women in STEM: How Race and Class Shape the Experiences of Undergraduate Women in STEM Majors at Arizona State University

Description

Women and people of color are some of the most underrepresented groups in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The purpose of this study was to uncover the

Women and people of color are some of the most underrepresented groups in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The purpose of this study was to uncover the barriers that undergraduate Hispanic women, as well as other women of color, face while pursuing an education in a STEM-related major at Arizona State University (ASU). In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 adult participants to dig deeper into the experiences of each woman and analyze how race and class overlap in each of the women's experiences. The concept of intersectionality was used to highlight various barriers such as perceptions of working versus middle-class students, the experience of being a first-generation college student, diversity campus-wide and in the classroom, effects of stereotyping, and impacts of mentorships. All women, no matter their gender, race, or socioeconomic status, faced struggles with stereotyping, marginalization, and isolation. Women in STEM majors at ASU performed better when provided with positive mentorships and grew aspirations to become a professional in the STEM field when encouraged and guided by someone who helped them build their scientific identities. Working-class women suffered from severe stress related to finances, family support, employment, and stereotyping. Reforming the culture of STEM fields in higher education will allow women to achieve success, further build their scientific identities, and increase the rate of women graduating with STEM degrees.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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How to Succeed In Business: A Guide for Students and Graduates

Description

This thesis presents a single source of what students may do during and soon after college to succeed in their careers. It shows what certain steps students should take to

This thesis presents a single source of what students may do during and soon after college to succeed in their careers. It shows what certain steps students should take to increase chances of success and to avoid unnecessary repetition of others' steps and mistakes. One's first full-time work position can be overwhelming and frightening, and navigating a wide variety of resources in addition to all the individual preparation required to begin a position can be a major time waste that increases the overwhelmed feelings. This thesis provides a trustworthy source that pools the outside information and also presents new and valuable data, enabling the avoidance repetition of others' overwhelming experiences. Although every person's experience is different and may require different actions, the information presented allows an understanding of steps and ideas one may benefit from implementing to guarantee or work toward greater success after college. The methods utilized to obtain the information presented are discussed and followed by the key points for students to understand. An appendix follows the bibliography and presents a list of the main directives to students/graduates from each section to enable easy access and understanding.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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How Does Camp Carey Help Contribute to the Overall Success of W.P. Carey School of Business Students?

Description

This study analyzes the connection between participation in Camp Carey and success at ASU by collecting data from students on their participation and their subsequent performance relative to their peers

This study analyzes the connection between participation in Camp Carey and success at ASU by collecting data from students on their participation and their subsequent performance relative to their peers at individual grade-levels. The main question asked is, "Is Camp Carey beneficial towards contributing to the overall social aptitude, academic success, campus involvement, leadership, or work experience of students?" By separating the different engagement categories by grade-level, the study will be able to explore these and other possible solutions on how to better improve the process for furthering student engagement for future students. The results of this research will give the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University an opportunity to make changes and improve student commitment to benefit the students, staff, and anyone directly associated with the Camp Carey program.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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CAREER SUCCESS VS. LIFE SATISFACTION: COMPETING OR COMPLEMENTARY?

Description

The Barrett Honors College thesis project is a chance to discover and research a topic that students are truly passionate about, and then share the findings with the Barrett community.

The Barrett Honors College thesis project is a chance to discover and research a topic that students are truly passionate about, and then share the findings with the Barrett community. The process of brainstorming project ideas and ultimately deciding on a topic is one, which is filled with excitement and curiosity. The topic that is chosen for current research identifies whether career and life satisfaction are competing or complementary factors for executives. The primary reason this particular topic has been selected for the honors thesis is because of the initial interest regarding achieving family and work-life balance in the professional world. The report focuses on the research proposal, methodology of conducting surveys and forming a strong research question, results from statistical analysis, and the implications of this study. As part of the brainstorming process, it is important to understand not only what students' perceptions are of achieving family and work-life balance, but also the American societal stigma of "having it all." After conducting significant research regarding career, family and balancing the two, it is evident that there are societal as well as cultural differences concerning career and personal lifestyle satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to further explore how executives today view the world in terms of overall satisfaction regarding various aspects of their lives including: relationships, family, work hours, vacation and balance, and to determine which factors are most influential in predicting satisfaction. In addition to this, it is also important to evaluate how the results from this research compare to the perceptions existing in modern day society about achieving both career and personal balance.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The Matrix of Success: An Examination of Extraordinary Outliers

Description

This thesis challenges the idea that there is a single "key to success". Instead, this paper examines how several different factors can have a significant impact on one's likelihood

This thesis challenges the idea that there is a single "key to success". Instead, this paper examines how several different factors can have a significant impact on one's likelihood for success, arguing that it is a matrix of these factor that is responsible for extraordinary success.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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Sub-par attributions: why women give up golf

Description

In the United States, recreational female golfers give up golf at twice the rate of recreational male golfers. This study explored the causal attributions of 240 recreational golfers after a

In the United States, recreational female golfers give up golf at twice the rate of recreational male golfers. This study explored the causal attributions of 240 recreational golfers after a practice session at a public golf facility. Attributions can be adaptive or maladaptive after a performance and can influence subsequent motivation to engage in a similar task again. It was hypothesized that male and female golfers would make significantly different attributions for their performance and that female golfers' attributions would be maladaptive. As the attrition rate for female golfers is highest in the first five years, it is also hypothesized that women's attributions will become more adaptive over time and that attributions will be moderated by the number of years playing golf and perceived level of success. A survey was used to measure golfers' attributions and general questions provided data for the number of years playing golf and gender. The subscales in the attribution survey were internal control, external control and stability. Attributions are adaptive or maladaptive depending on the level of perceived success, so success of the practice performance was collected. The hypothesis that recreational female golfers make significantly different attributions than recreational male golfers was supported only by the external control sub-scale. Female golfers perceived their performance as significantly less successful than male golfers. Considering this perception of success, women golfers' attributions were maladaptive. The hypothesis that women golfers' attributions become more adaptive over time was supported. Time playing golf predicted a significant amount of variance for internal attributions of female golfers. However, the hypothesis that attributions will be moderated by the number of years playing golf and perceived success was not supported.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010