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An Exploration of Multicultural Musicianship through Composition and Performance

Description

“In what ways can I engage an audience of primarily western musicians in experiencing a new musical world in dialogue with the one they know?” The author begins by asking himself this question. He describes a project which will answer

“In what ways can I engage an audience of primarily western musicians in experiencing a new musical world in dialogue with the one they know?” The author begins by asking himself this question. He describes a project which will answer this question, then selects and focuses on a single aspect of this project: the arranging of three pieces from Kenzou Hatanaka’s Iyonokuni Matsuyama Suigun Daiko for woodwind quintet and taiko from its original orchestration for band and taiko. Emphasis is placed on creating an enticing multicultural work that equally presents western and Japanese influences, and the author’s compositional process and considerations are explained. A discussion of what the author learned about multiculturalism and himself concludes.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Recording For Teachers

Description

There is value in audio recording for teachers, whether one is a music teacher recording their students and ensembles or a classroom teacher recording oneself or their students. Music and classroom teachers have various reasons for wanting to record their

There is value in audio recording for teachers, whether one is a music teacher recording their students and ensembles or a classroom teacher recording oneself or their students. Music and classroom teachers have various reasons for wanting to record their students, such as hearing what is being produced in rehearsals and having students reflect on their own performance and musical progress. Teachers may desire to record their students, but they may not know how to do so. Simple recording tools such as cell phones do not produce quality recordings, and unless they have specialized training, teachers may not be familiar with other kinds of recording equipment or how they can set up equipment in order to obtain a good quality recording. I searched for resources on recording equipment and techniques, but I could not find a single source that teachers could consult to learn about the basics of recording equipment and techniques. Teachers have limited time and may also have limited financial resources. The purpose of my project was to create a free and easy-to-use resource for teachers to answer their questions on recording and give them the tools that they need in order to get started with making basic, high quality recordings. The research process included research about different kinds of recording hardware and software, documenting recording techniques for different settings and instruments, and interviewing teachers about their needs. The product that that resulted from this project is a website, Recording For Teachers (https://sites.google.com/view/recordingforteachers/). This website features information about recording equipment, the recording process, how to produce shareable files, and an interactive means of posting questions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-12

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Making Clarinet Reeds by Hand

Description

Making Clarinet Reeds by Hand is an instructive manual for the collegiate or professional clarinetist seeking to learn about how to have more control over their reeds. It explores reasons to consider making one’s own clarinet reeds by hand, explains

Making Clarinet Reeds by Hand is an instructive manual for the collegiate or professional clarinetist seeking to learn about how to have more control over their reeds. It explores reasons to consider making one’s own clarinet reeds by hand, explains the process in detail both from starting with tube cane or from commercially purchased reed blanks, and includes a cost and time effectiveness analysis highlighting the benefits and disadvantages of making reeds by hand. The thesis also includes a variety of pictures, diagrams, and infographics to incorporate visual explanation as well as addresses the common mistakes associated with each part of the reed making process. The thesis is organized into many sections and section headings to facilitate quick reference for specific questions, as well as incorporates step-by-step guides that walk through the general reed making process.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Music as a Language: Schumann's Novelette Op. 21, No. 8

Description

This creative project explores the concept of how music is like a language and how, as a teacher, I plan to enforce this concept through my teaching. The aim of this project is to highlight the importance of completing research

This creative project explores the concept of how music is like a language and how, as a teacher, I plan to enforce this concept through my teaching. The aim of this project is to highlight the importance of completing research and acquiring knowledge of aspects, such as the composer's life, historical background and literary references, when learning a piece of music. Through this project, I address connections between the brain and music pertaining to memorization, the components of language, the similarities between language and music, the role of the teacher and the development of a "toolbox" of knowledge for studying a piece of music. I present my own research on Schumann's Novelette Op. 21, No. 8 in f-sharp minor as well as my own experiences of learning the piece to demonstrate an example of the process and discoveries I hope my students will make in their own studies of repertoire.

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Date Created
2017-12

The Cello as a Voice of Humanity - Bach and Kodaly: An Exploration/Recital

Description

This thesis explores the musical and historical aspects of two of the greatest solo works for the cello: Suite No. 6 in D major, BWV 1012 by Johann Sebastian Bach and the Sonata for Solo Cello, Op. 8 by Zoltán

This thesis explores the musical and historical aspects of two of the greatest solo works for the cello: Suite No. 6 in D major, BWV 1012 by Johann Sebastian Bach and the Sonata for Solo Cello, Op. 8 by Zoltán Kodály. The thesis and creative project consists of a researched paper of approximately 30 pages of historical and musical analysis on both pieces and the “defense” was a recital where I performed both pieces memorized with an informed approach. Part I explores of Bach’s Suite No. 6 in D major, BWV 1012, and Section 1 includes a biography and historical context during the period in which the sixth suite was written. Section 2 consists of an analysis of all six movements (Prelude-Allemande-Courante-Sarabande-Gavottes I and II-Gigue). The analysis explores the German dance form of the suite movements and how they are relevant to the sixth suite, as well as musical aspects that make the sixth suite unique. Part II explores Kodály’s Sonata for Solo Cello, Op. 8 that has a similar structure as Part I with a Section 1 of biography and historical context during the period of the sonata, and a Section 2 analysis. Section 1 explores Kodály’s life and studies in folk music that is relevant to the Sonata, and Section 2 musical analysis with points of relevance to the Hungarian language folk song. The Sonata consists of three lengthy movements (Allegro maestoso ma appassionato-Adagio con grand espressione-Allegro vivace) and the analysis consists of formal, musical, and a few pedagogical approaches. The thesis is rounded out with a conclusion of personal reflection added during the revision process. This musical and historical analysis greatly informed my performance of these works and the “defense” recital was highly successful.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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E-Strings Academy: An Interactive Online Resource Center for the 21st Century String Musician

Description

E-Strings Academy (www.estringsacademy.wordpress.com) is a resource website intended for the beginning violinist, violist, cellist, and bassist. The mission of the website is to extend musical learning opportunities to students outside of the physical string classroom and to engage first-year

E-Strings Academy (www.estringsacademy.wordpress.com) is a resource website intended for the beginning violinist, violist, cellist, and bassist. The mission of the website is to extend musical learning opportunities to students outside of the physical string classroom and to engage first-year string students in musical activities at home that supplement the instruction they receive in a school setting. The current website features five different areas for students to explore: lesson videos, tunes, listening activities, games, and resources. In each area, students have the opportunity to learn and reinforce musical concepts and skill sets that they will need in order to be successful in music, both in their first year of playing and beyond. I created E-Strings Academy with the intention that I use it with my own string students in my future teaching career. It is a flexible website that I will continue to revise, adapt, and enhance to best serve the needs of my students and enrich their musical learning outside of the classroom.

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Date Created
2015-05

Chronos: An Arrangement for Jazz Sextet

Description

"Chronos" is a composition by the great jazz pianist, Aaron Parks. Originally arranged for a quartet consisting of piano, upright bass, drums and tenor saxophone, I sought to arrange the piece for a sextet consisting of trombone, alto saxophone, tenor

"Chronos" is a composition by the great jazz pianist, Aaron Parks. Originally arranged for a quartet consisting of piano, upright bass, drums and tenor saxophone, I sought to arrange the piece for a sextet consisting of trombone, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, guitar, upright, bass, and drums. This thesis outlines my process as I transcribed "Chronos" from the original recording and then arranged it for a new ensemble. It also discusses the difficulties faced in all the phases of the project from transcribing to rehearsing and performing the work. My arrangement is included with the thesis for those who wish to analyze the music as well as a recording of a live performance of my arrangement at The Nash in downtown Phoenix on April 7th, 2015.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Asset Forfeitures in Arizona Law Enforcement: A Record of How They Seize and Spend

Description

This creative project is the first draft of a database of financial records from Arizona law enforcement's use of the state asset forfeiture program from fiscal 2011-2015. Asset forfeiture is a program by which law enforcement can seize property suspected

This creative project is the first draft of a database of financial records from Arizona law enforcement's use of the state asset forfeiture program from fiscal 2011-2015. Asset forfeiture is a program by which law enforcement can seize property suspected to have been used in a crime and can then use the property, cash, or proceeds from the property's auction for its own purposes, raising questions of conflicts of interest. The paper explains the methodology and goals for the database, while the database itself represents more than 11,000 pages of financial records and is more than 70,300 cells large.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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French Vanilla: An Exploration of Biracial Identity Through Narrative Performance

Description

"French Vanilla" is a collection of written narratives drawn from lived experiences which serve as the vehicle storytelling that I use to examine larger themes related to the intersections of race and gender. Themes include: binaries, legitimacy, intersectionality, biracial identity

"French Vanilla" is a collection of written narratives drawn from lived experiences which serve as the vehicle storytelling that I use to examine larger themes related to the intersections of race and gender. Themes include: binaries, legitimacy, intersectionality, biracial identity development (border identity construction), whiteness, shame, and crisis. While the narratives are situated within theoretical discourse, the narratives present a representation of the lived experience. These pieces engage members of my family as well as a number of figures, including Rachel Dolezal, President Barack Obama, Alicia Keys, and a stranger on a tram in an airport. My relationship with these people present the grounds for an interrogation of identity. This project asks the question: How does one negotiate biracial identity with herself and others through narrative performance? It engages theories, such as critical race theory, black feminist theory, and standpoint theory, which informed my understanding of the discourse of race and contextualized my commentary on race. These theories present a framework within which to situate my understanding and analysis of race through lived experience. Narrative performance, the formal methodology for this work, provides a structure for the performance itself: the ultimate end product. Note: This work of creative scholarship is rooted in collaboration between three female artist-scholars: Carly Bates, Raji Ganesan, and Allyson Yoder. Working from a common intersectional, feminist framework, we served as artistic co-directors of each other's solo pieces and co-producers of Negotiations, in which we share these pieces in relationship to each other. Thus, Negotiations is not a showcase of three individual works, but rather a conversation among three voices. As collaborators, we have been uncompromising in the pursuit of our own unique inquiries and voices, and each of our works of creative scholarship stand alone. However, we believe that all of the parts are best understood in relationship to each other and to the whole. For this reason, we have chosen to cross-reference our thesis documents: French Vanilla: An Exploration of Biracial Identity Through Narrative Performance by Carly Bates; Deep roots, shared fruits: Emergent creative process and the ecology of solo performance through "Dress in Something Plain and Dark" by Allyson Yoder; and Bhairavi: A Performance-Investigation of Belonging and Dis-Belonging in Diaspora Communities by Raji Ganesan.

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Date Created
2016-05

Suitable for All Ages: A Reference for Therapeutic Music Making Experiences

Description

This collaborative, creative project includes 100 music therapy interventions for all ages including children 0-18, young adults 19-25, adults 26-65, and older adults/geriatrics 65-death. Five goal areas are focused on for each of the four populations. These goal areas are

This collaborative, creative project includes 100 music therapy interventions for all ages including children 0-18, young adults 19-25, adults 26-65, and older adults/geriatrics 65-death. Five goal areas are focused on for each of the four populations. These goal areas are cognitive, social, physical, emotional, and behavioral. Each intervention was modeled after Duerksen's (1978) five ways in which music can be used as a organizational, helpful, learning tool: (1) Music as a carrier of information (2) Music as a reinforcer (3) Music as a background for learning (4) Music as a physical structure for the learning activity (5) Music as a reflection of skills or processes learned. The creative possibilities of interacting musically with clients of all ages and levels of functioning are what led us to create this project. The wide variety of populations covered in this project include children on the autism spectrum, young adults suffering from depression, and geriatrics exhibiting symptoms of Dementia. This book encompasses all of these populations and more, providing client-centered activities to use in music therapy sessions. This project was created with the intention of sharing it with fellow students and peers, as well as for the future use of ourselves in our internship experiences and careers.

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Date Created
2014-05