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Eat In, Not Out: A Comparative Analysis Between at Home Cooking and Restaurant Dining

Description

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this information with our peers to potentially influence them to make a healthy lifestyle change. The first step was to determine the factors that influence college-aged students eating habits, and was presented with a review of relevant literature in several topics. We researched food literacy in young adults, the impact of fast food, social media's role in healthy eating habits, health behavior change in young adults, and the benefits of home cooking to obtain a general baseline of the knowledge of college-aged students. The initial research was utilized to write more effective blog posts that appropriately addressed our targeted demographic and to determine what platforms would be most appropriate to convey our information. These ideas were taken and then translated into a blog and Instagram account that contained healthy, copycat recipes of popular restaurant meals. We wrote 30 blog posts which were made up of 20 original recipes, 8 nutrition informational posts, and an introduction/conclusion. Finally, a focus group was hosted to ascertain the opinions of our peers, and to determine if they would be willing to make a lifestyle change in the form of cooking more frequently as opposed to eating out regularly. We provided them with a pre and post survey to gather their opinions before and after reviewing the findings of our research and project. We concluded that if given the information in an accessible way, college students are willing to eat in, not out.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Does an extended washout period of six weeks following the end of chronic stress continue the benefits on spatial learning and memory?

Description

Chronic stress often leads to cognitive deficits, especially within the spatial memory domain mediated by the hippocampus. When chronic stress ends and a no-stress period ensues (i.e., washout, WO), spatial ability improves, which can be better than non-stressed controls (CON).

Chronic stress often leads to cognitive deficits, especially within the spatial memory domain mediated by the hippocampus. When chronic stress ends and a no-stress period ensues (i.e., washout, WO), spatial ability improves, which can be better than non-stressed controls (CON). The WO period is often the same duration as the chronic stress paradigm. Given the potential benefit of a post-stress WO period on cognition, it is important to investigate whether this potential benefit of a post-stress WO period has long-lasting effects. In this project, chronic restraint (6hr/d/21d) in Sprague-Dawley rats was used, as it is the minimum duration necessary to observe spatial memory deficits. Two durations of post-stress WO were used following the end of chronic restraint, 3 weeks (STR-WO3) and 6 weeks (STR-WO6). Immediately after chronic stress (STR-IMM) or the WO periods, rats were tested on various cognitive tests. We corroborated past studies that chronic stress impaired spatial memory (STR-IMM vs CON). Interestingly, STR-WO3 and STR-WO6 failed to demonstrate improved spatial memory on a radial arm water maze task, performing similarly as STR-IMM. Performance outcomes were unlikely from differences in anxiety or motivation because rats from all conditions performed similarly on an open field task and on a simple object recognition paradigm, respectively. However, performance on object placement was unusual in that very few rats explored, suggesting some degree of anxiety or fear in all groups. One possible interpretation of the unusual results of the 3 week washout group may be attributed to the different spatial memory tasks used across studies or external factors from the study. Further exploration of these other factors led to the conclusion that they did not play a role and the STR-WO3 RAWM data were anomalous to other studies. This suggests that a washout period following chronic stress may not be fully understood.

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Date Created
2017-05

A Most Creative Project: Producing a Sample-Based Record

Description

For my creative project, I originally decided to produce an original instrumental EP (Extended Play), its aim to bridge the gap between classical Choral/Orchestral literature and more modern Hip-Hop/Rhythm & Blues through the implementation of sample-based sounds and melodies. As

For my creative project, I originally decided to produce an original instrumental EP (Extended Play), its aim to bridge the gap between classical Choral/Orchestral literature and more modern Hip-Hop/Rhythm & Blues through the implementation of sample-based sounds and melodies. As the semester went on, however, I realized that my original focus was really putting a strain on my creativity. A broadening in scope was exactly what I needed to spark the creativity within me. I had to create what suited me at the time, or what was a reflection of my current environment. This change began to push me beyond what I believed I was capable of; the tracks for the EP seemed to follow effortlessly. For the first production on my EP, I sampled from an a cappella file that I found on a royalty-free music database. The file had a raw cut, sans instrumentation and effects, of a teenage girl singing an original Soul/Rhythm & Blues tune of hers named "Don't Go." Atop the vocal, I added an original drum kit and sub-bass waveform, sound-designed by me, and an airy synthesizer line. My second original production, titled "Dreams," is a production that exudes everything that I stand for and am inspired by with regards to music. This work is the kind of production that got me into producing music in the first place. It demonstrates simplicity and elegance in every sense. A Rhythm & Blues record (Monnie Riperton's Edge of a Dream), a simple, yet hard-hitting drum groove with drum sounds sampled from live drums, and bass-line were the only ingredients necessary to produce "Dreams." The video logs, an addition to the original productions, were put in place to track my progress throughout the semester. The observer gets to learn alongside me, from the inception and into the execution of the project, the facets of sampling, building a drum groove, and creating an arrangement. By including access to my workflow as part of this project, I wish to provide a dynamic, evolving tool for producers in the future.

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Created

Date Created
2015-05

Searching for home: An in depth look at undocumented youth in Arizona from their perspective

Description

Searching for home: An in depth look at undocumented youth in Arizona from their perspective, a research and creative project, looks at not only the history and data surrounding unauthorized immigration, but a personal account through the stories of undocumented

Searching for home: An in depth look at undocumented youth in Arizona from their perspective, a research and creative project, looks at not only the history and data surrounding unauthorized immigration, but a personal account through the stories of undocumented immigrants. The research paper focuses on the policies, court cases and history of protests that surround the topics. The article under Appendix A focuses on the personal stories and accounts of two undocumented immigrants who discuss the importance of fighting to stay in the U.S. and preserving the dream and life they built. Two videos also explore the emotional stories of the undocumented immigrants and those who live on the border. The first video features two undocumented immigrants who discuss their beliefs in protesting and working to stay in the U.S. The second video features two women who have lived in both Mexico and the U.S. legally and discuss how immigration and border policies affect them.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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Stories of Female Figures in Norse Mythology Adapted for Children:Women of Norse Myth: For Little Goddesses

Description

Popular culture tends to downplay strong female characters to favor a plethora of male figures that children look up to as heroes. This creates a gender imbalance in exposure to inspirational characters that children can look up to as role

Popular culture tends to downplay strong female characters to favor a plethora of male figures that children look up to as heroes. This creates a gender imbalance in exposure to inspirational characters that children can look up to as role models. For our team's creative project, we chose to write and illustrate a children's book mainly targeted at young girls, ages eight to twelve that focuses on the stories of selected female figures of Norse mythology. The five stories in our collection focus on the figures Frigg, Skadi, Elli, Idunn, and Freya and are inspired by the mythology contained in the Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson and selected medieval texts on the Germanic Lombard tribe. Through our book, Women of Norse Myth: For Little Goddesses, we wanted to introduce children to Norse mythology, a branch of myth that is often overshadowed by more popular mythologies such as Roman and Greek. Additionally, our goal was to bring light to the female figures within Norse myth that are generally given less attention than their male counterparts. Keeping in mind these goals, the stories were adapted from the original myths in a manner that would be suitable for a young audience as well as our aim for female empowerment. The final manuscript contains an introduction to Norse cosmology, introductions to the figures, a glossary of Norse terms used, and the illustrated stories themselves. Together with our combined talents, interests, and goals, Women of Norse Myth: For Little Goddesses was completed, and we hope that someday it can be published and serve as a fun and inspiring storybook for children to read and learn from.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

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ASU PAGE TURNERS: TURNING THE PAGE TO SUCCESS

Description

The ASU Page Turners is an entrepreneurial community action program founded by Chase Fitzgerald and Hannah McAtee. In 2014, a third program partner, Chloe Holmes, replaced Hannah as co-president. The ASU Page Turners program aims to enhance opportunities for the

The ASU Page Turners is an entrepreneurial community action program founded by Chase Fitzgerald and Hannah McAtee. In 2014, a third program partner, Chloe Holmes, replaced Hannah as co-president. The ASU Page Turners program aims to enhance opportunities for the children of the Tempe/Mesa school districts through a unique one-on-one weekly reading program that is designed to draw together engaged ASU Barrett students and similarly motivated second and third grade students at the Tempe Public Library. The ASU Page Turners empowers the youth of our community by growing reading confidence, vocalization, and public speaking that can serve as transformative skill sets both in and out of the classroom. This document serves as a description and appraisal of the work done to establish the program, expand its reach and success, reflect on the experiences of the primary collaborators, appraise the value of the work as seen by the Tempe Public library, and set it on a sustainable path of growth for its future with Barrett, The Honors College and the Tempe Public Library. The Page Turners community consists of thirty Barrett students and thirty second and third grade students from ASU's greater community who actively embrace our mission to cultivate their own intellectual growth in a safe and productive manner. We look for every opportunity to encourage academic development, hold ourselves accountable, and realize our potential through the work we are doing, regardless if you are the student or the teacher. We have learned that these roles regularly reverse themselves, as there is much to learn from an inquisitive child's mind.

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Created

Date Created
2015-05

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Formation of a Guide to Implementing a Student-Run Clinic for Underserved Populations

Description

This manual provides a "how-to" framework for the development of a student-run clinic. The manual should be used as a resource, referring to the table of contents and summaries of topics for specific areas of interest. The manual details the

This manual provides a "how-to" framework for the development of a student-run clinic. The manual should be used as a resource, referring to the table of contents and summaries of topics for specific areas of interest. The manual details the phases for the development of a student-run clinic focusing on underserved populations. The Student Health Outreach for Wellness (S.H.O.W.) Community Initiative in Phoenix, Arizona serves as the example. S.H.O.W. represents just one type of clinic structuring. As such, it is important to realize when developing a clinic that there are numerous clinic approaches based on community needs, volunteer support, and funding.

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Date Created
2014-12