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The purpose of this thesis is to examine the effects of digital on the fashion industry. In order to accomplish this, we must first examine the fashion industry, as well as the emerging digital space, and how these two industries are rapidly colliding. Fashion, an industry that has been around

The purpose of this thesis is to examine the effects of digital on the fashion industry. In order to accomplish this, we must first examine the fashion industry, as well as the emerging digital space, and how these two industries are rapidly colliding. Fashion, an industry that has been around since the early 1800s in the United States (Fashion History: The American System for Fashion, 2009), is being forced to pivot, and change its traditional practices, in order to remain relevant in a world heavily influenced by the Internet and consumer preferences. The largest changes taking place within fashion include the power of various industry influencers, including designers, magazines, retailers and lifestyle bloggers, and the rise of blogging as a fashion news source. Although designers, magazines and retailers still have significant clout within the industry, bloggers are becoming a force to be reckoned with, adding a new variable to the industry.

Meanwhile, digital is still being defined, as countless people work to determine best practices and reconcile the unending amount of information available into something that can be used. Trends in digital include the concept of new media, blogging, social media and new channels of media. Overall, we are seeing a shift to user-­‐ generated content, available all the time, and a proliferation of content being created and published on the Web.

Some of the ways these two industries are colliding include the rise of lifestyle bloggers, developments and usage of technology, an abundance of new e-­‐commerce models, and finally, a shift in the ways consumers curate and discover products online.

Predictions for the future include a more streamlined and user-­‐friendly process for search and product discovery online, increase in social commerce and personalization of products, and finally, a return to brick and mortar shopping, but with an improved, experiential model. These trends will affect industry stakeholders dramatically, and so necessary actions for these stakeholders are also discussed, such as allocating more resources to content generation and e-­‐commerce, giving consumers the ability to personalize, and improving their physical shopping experiences to provide something valuable and entertaining.
ContributorsLose', Jenna Elizabeth (Author) / Ostrom, Amy (Thesis director) / Giles, Bret (Committee member) / Boonlorn, Jennifer (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor)
Created2013-05
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This paper is rooted in the field of business, with an emphasis on entrepreneurship in the fashion industry. The questions we tried to answer were the following: What are factors of success for current fashion brands? What is important to our target market when shopping? How can we deliver these

This paper is rooted in the field of business, with an emphasis on entrepreneurship in the fashion industry. The questions we tried to answer were the following: What are factors of success for current fashion brands? What is important to our target market when shopping? How can we deliver these attributes to our target market? How can we use our findings to create a fashion brand? First, we conducted in-depth external analysis about existing retailers including, Forever 21, Zara and Brandy Melville. After doing so, we created brand molecules and learned about other people's perceptions in relation to these existing brands. Next, using our own qualitative and quantitative research, we sought to understand the many gaps in the overall shopping experience for college students and young working professionals. Our research revealed many common themes and trends that we will integrate into our proposed business plan in efforts to fill the gaps. Through our data analysis, common trends included how our demographic learns about new fashion trends, statement pieces versus mix-and-match basics, online shopping versus in-store shopping, price sensitivity of our target market, and lastly, the quality of customer service and the store's return policy. After our extensive research and data analysis, we began to construct our brand. We propose a new business model that targets our fashion-forward consumer with a memorable shopping experience that delivers high-quality and trendiness to their wardrobe. Using the elements and trends we identified, combined with our own vision, we combined them into one brand, The Capsule Collection. ur brand will feature high-quality, reasonably priced basics ranging from everyday casual to business casual. We will have store locations in cities where there are many young working professionals, and target them through social media advertising. Our store will feature an open layout with clean and minimalistic displays, keeping everything in neutral tones and accented with plants. The goal of The Capsule Collection is to make shopping as easy and exciting as possible, and focus entirely on the customer's experience.
ContributorsMeyyappan, Rathna (Co-author) / Aggarwal, Payal (Co-author) / Gray, Nancy (Thesis director) / Samper, Adriana (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Department of Information Systems (Contributor) / Department of Supply Chain Management (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2016-12
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Description
Streetwear is a category of fashion that has evolved from being a niche style of dress influenced by American counter cultures, into a formidable industry. Over time, Streetwear has become a culture in itself whose members are critical of inauthentic brands and commercialization. Streetwear brands have the need to be

Streetwear is a category of fashion that has evolved from being a niche style of dress influenced by American counter cultures, into a formidable industry. Over time, Streetwear has become a culture in itself whose members are critical of inauthentic brands and commercialization. Streetwear brands have the need to be perceived as authentic, exclusive, and being connected to celebrity to survive in the industry long-term. Additionally, as the industry grows larger, the marketplace has become increasingly saturated. This can be attributed to how easy it is to create a fledgling streetwear brand due to advances in garment production technology and streetwear's roots in low-cost clothing. Streetwear brands need to differentiate themselves in an effective manner to stand out to consumers in the saturated streetwear market. Primary research conducted via a survey administered to streetwear consumers was done to learn more about the effectiveness of popular tactics and marketplace events streetwear brands use to differentiate themselves. Secondary research was done in literature on the topics of creativity and energized differentiation. Research by Gerzema and Lebar presented in their book The Brand Bubble on the topic of energized differentiation is reviewed and applied to streetwear brands. This thesis will discuss the key elements brands need to have to be successful in the streetwear industry. Along with this, it will also look at the effectiveness of specific tactics bands can execute to effectively differentiate themselves in the saturated industry and the important role creativity plays in their success.
ContributorsGriblin, Austin W. (Author) / Ostrom, Amy (Thesis director) / Samper, Adriana (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts (Contributor) / W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2018-05
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This thesis explores the current relationship between high fashion and the advancements and changes in technology that have catapulted the industry into a potentially dangerous level. It is simple for one to identify fashion as a booming industry; however, upon further inquiry, it becomes clear that the pace of the

This thesis explores the current relationship between high fashion and the advancements and changes in technology that have catapulted the industry into a potentially dangerous level. It is simple for one to identify fashion as a booming industry; however, upon further inquiry, it becomes clear that the pace of the fashion industry is unsustainable as the demands and expectations that the current consumer has for high fashion brands grow unproportional with the standard rate of the industry. In 2016, the fashion industry reached $2.4 trillion in total value, placing it as the seventh largest economy in the world (Amed, 2016), but these numbers are as fickle as a fashion trend. The fear and talk of the current state of fashion is that this will stagnate and even drop off, due to multiple factors. The shift to the "see now/buy now" platform (CFDA, 2016), a marked reliance on social media "influencers" in order to determine success (Friedman, 2016), and the commercialization of creative directors attributing to the high turnover rate at brands (Prigent, 2016) may lead one to conclude the technology is positively affecting the fashion industry. However, these factors ought lead one to conclude that high fashion is moving at an unsustainable pace, one which will result in long-term detriments to the seemingly unshakable industry and remove high fashion off its current pedestal. Over the past few years, a larger consumer base motivated growth in sales numbers, but in 2016, sales growth was at 2-3% with predictions of stagnation to come for the upcoming years (Amed, 2016). This thesis will look at if the high fashion industry itself has become "trendy" and where the current peak of the industry will lead for the future.
ContributorsGur-Arie, Hannah Esther (Author) / Gray, Nancy (Thesis director) / Ostrom, Amy (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2017-05
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The magazine industry plays an important role in shaping how women speak, act, and perceive themselves and others. This industry presents pleasure, consumerism, and a cult of femininity to its largely female readers. The purpose of the literature review was to understand the culture of women's magazines and find a

The magazine industry plays an important role in shaping how women speak, act, and perceive themselves and others. This industry presents pleasure, consumerism, and a cult of femininity to its largely female readers. The purpose of the literature review was to understand the culture of women's magazines and find a method of examination that would fit best with the intent of this thesis project. Based on this research, the project involved reconstructing a series of Glamour magazine articles from a feminist perspective. This study looked at the degree to which Glamour's editorial content and graphics matched its editorial policy. By researching previous studies of women's magazines, the literature review guided the reframing of Glamour articles from a feminist perspective. Most of the studies reviewed were written in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, when the radical feminist movement was at its peak. Since then, few analyses have been made on the topic of feminism and women's magazines. This project offered an update on that research by looking at current women's magazines and evaluating if their content/graphics have improved over the last thirty years. Twelve Glamour magazine articles over a three-year period, 2012 to 2014, were selected at random to rewrite. By reconstructing the editorial content and graphics from the selected articles, this study hoped to create a more positive and beneficial magazine for women free of gender stereotypes. Rather than produce a magazine that criticizes women, the reconstructed version of Glamour included a voice that made women feel accepted. This required removing language that reinforced negative gender stereotypes and content that urged women to be perfect, please men, look a certain way, and more. This study found that Glamour is actually a lot closer to representing this gender-neutral magazine ideal than previously thought and creating a gender-neutral magazine is possible with thoughtful editing.
ContributorsAffelt, Stacia Emily (Author) / Barrett, Marianne (Thesis director) / Hawken-Collins, Denise (Committee member) / Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2015-12
Description
This thesis analyzes identity construction through street style fashion in the city. The focus of this project is Roosevelt Row, the artists' district in Downtown Phoenix. The goal of this project is to compare Roosevelt Row's marketing image with the fashion seen on the streets and at events in the

This thesis analyzes identity construction through street style fashion in the city. The focus of this project is Roosevelt Row, the artists' district in Downtown Phoenix. The goal of this project is to compare Roosevelt Row's marketing image with the fashion seen on the streets and at events in the area. The creative project involved the creation of an iPad publication displaying the street style fashions seen on Roosevelt Row. This project aims to analyze if the street style fashion seen on Roosevelt Row reflects the marketing image of the area.
ContributorsKraus, Tamara Renee (Author) / Barrett, Marianne (Thesis director) / Gilpin, Dawn (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication (Contributor)
Created2015-12
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Description

This creative is established in the field of business, with an emphasis on fashion, art, and<br/>the creation of a body-positive exhibit. Using qualitative research from experts on fashion<br/>curation, we seek to create, curate and pitch a fashion exhibit. Using the information we gather<br/>from experts from two different museums, we will

This creative is established in the field of business, with an emphasis on fashion, art, and<br/>the creation of a body-positive exhibit. Using qualitative research from experts on fashion<br/>curation, we seek to create, curate and pitch a fashion exhibit. Using the information we gather<br/>from experts from two different museums, we will create a new age exhibit that pushes the<br/>boundaries of fashion as art through our theme of body positivity.

ContributorsGulinson, Chloe (Co-author) / Palmer, Jacqueline (Co-author) / Gray, Nancy (Thesis director) / Leslie, Bush (Committee member) / School of Art (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / The Design School (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2021-05
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Description

A guide to implementing empathy in crisis communications

ContributorsLong, Mary Louise (Author) / Schmidtke, Lisa (Thesis director) / Bovio, Sonia (Committee member) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Comm (Contributor, Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2021-05
Description

Valued as a $28 billion industry in 2021, the second-hand clothing industry, or thrifting industry, has been exploding (2020 Fashion Resale Market and Trend Report, 2020). This has been aided by a myriad of technological advancements, social movements, and economic factors. The goal of this thesis is to uncover consumer

Valued as a $28 billion industry in 2021, the second-hand clothing industry, or thrifting industry, has been exploding (2020 Fashion Resale Market and Trend Report, 2020). This has been aided by a myriad of technological advancements, social movements, and economic factors. The goal of this thesis is to uncover consumer behaviors leading to this growth across behavioral, emotional, perceptual, and belief factors. Additionally, this thesis aims to provide strategic implications for marketing professionals, create recommendations for brands to successfully enter this industry and target consumers. In this study, a Qualtrics survey was distributed to students at Arizona State University. The results were analyzed through Microsoft Excel. The results showed that in order to be successful in this industry, brands should: emphasize sustainability in marketing, increase brand awareness, highlight feelings of pride in products, uniqueness, and affordability, mitigate feelings of poverty, low quality, and lack of variety, understand the perceptual differences in shopping versus thrifting, and take advantage of branded fashion.

ContributorsRoach, Brianna (Author) / Eaton, John (Thesis director) / Bush, Leslie (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor)
Created2023-05
ContributorsRoach, Brianna (Author) / Eaton, John (Thesis director) / Bush, Leslie (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor)
Created2023-05