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Bouis Vuitton: Bags for the Revolution

Description

Fashion is an inherently political and reflective medium for the daily ramblings and revolutions of a society. Much of the time the influence is subtle. Silhouettes and fabrics reflect different stances on conservatism, on sex, on the degrees to which

Fashion is an inherently political and reflective medium for the daily ramblings and revolutions of a society. Much of the time the influence is subtle. Silhouettes and fabrics reflect different stances on conservatism, on sex, on the degrees to which we fetishize luxury, and on infinite other attitudes of an era. Other times the influence is extremely direct, with text printed on the clothing that explicitly articulates a current societal dynamic. I began exploring fashion in 2016, as the country had reached an unprecedented and linguistically weaponized divide.

While taking a fashion technology course under the instruction of Galina Mihaleva, I developed a tracksuit incorporating concealed LED displays that are capable of scrolling customizable text on the sides of the garment. I expanded on this futuristic execution of politically charged clothes by utilizing a more realistic application of the LED technology in the Bouis Vuitton project. This project is a collection of six white vinyl bags with semi-flexible LED displays projecting revolutionary slogans through the vinyl textile.

The bags act as an appropriate housing for technology that is intended for significantly longer use, as bags have a longer lifespan in wardrobes than clothes and return to trend more frequently. The production investment in the technology is more equitable to the investment in the production of a bag and facilitates the wearer’s broadcasting of concise messages. The result is a collection of functional, utilitarian pieces with a clean, futuristic look and a mixed modern and vintage silhouette scrolling pro-revolutionary messages.

Broadcasting the knock-off name ‘BOUIS VUITTON’, I’ve inserted only my first initial into the reputable luxury company and paired it with slogans: ‘EAT THE RICH’ and ‘HEADS WILL ROLL’. The collection articulates a sense of nihilism felt by the youngest generations growing up on the outside of a very exclusive economic and political sphere. Three upcycled vintage luggage pieces evoke associations with the white American upper-class society of the 1960s. The luggage pieces were retrofitted in white vinyl and white-enameled metal fixtures. Three additional soft bags made of the same material reflect a utilitarian style of functional bags on trend with Spring/Summer 2019 streetwear. For the runway presentation of the bags, the models are dressed in navy-colored Dickies boiler suits, white retro-style Fila sneakers, and white ascots reminiscent of the historical male ruffled cravat. The contradictions of iconic silhouettes from both upper and lower-class American fashion history further the juxtaposition of anti-capitalist slogans posted on luxury goods.

Bouis Vuitton: Bags for the Revolution is intended to embody an unapologetic disregard for established wealth and political power in the most public of venues: the sidewalk, the mall, the high and the low-income neighborhoods – wherever people are wearing clothes. Fashion is the modern protest that requires no permit, and the new poster is a luxury bag.

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2019-05

Tell It to the Frogs: Fukushima’s nuclear disaster and its impact on the Japanese Tree Frog

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“Tell It to the Frogs: Fukushima’s nuclear disaster and its impact on the Japanese Tree Frog” is a representation of the work from Giraudeau et. al’s “Carotenoid distribution in wild Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) exposed to ionizing radiation in

“Tell It to the Frogs: Fukushima’s nuclear disaster and its impact on the Japanese Tree Frog” is a representation of the work from Giraudeau et. al’s “Carotenoid distribution in wild Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) exposed to ionizing radiation in Fukushima.” This paper looked to see if carotenoid levels in the tree frog’s vocal sac, liver, and blood were affected by radiation from Fukushima’s power plant explosion. Without carotenoids, the pigment that gives the frogs their orange color on their necks, their courtship practices would be impacted and would not be as able to show off their fitness to potential mates. The artwork inspired by this research displayed the tree frog’s degradation over time due to radiation, starting with normal life and ending with their death and open on the table. The sculptures also pinpoint where the carotenoids were being measured with a brilliant orange glaze. Through ceramic hand building, the artist created larger than life frogs in hopes to elicit curiosity about them and their plight. While the paper did not conclude any changes in the frog’s physiology after 18 months of exposure, there are still questions that are left unanswered. Why did these frogs not have any reaction? Could there be any effects after more time has passed? Is radiation leakage as big of a problem as previously thought? The only way to get the answers to these questions is to be aware of these amphibians, the circumstances that led them to be involved, and continued research on them and radiation.

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2019-05

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Fashion is Art: An Exhibit

Description

This creative is established in the field of business, with an emphasis on fashion, art, and<br/>the creation of a body-positive exhibit. Using qualitative research from experts on fashion<br/>curation, we seek to create, curate and pitch a fashion exhibit. Using the

This creative is established in the field of business, with an emphasis on fashion, art, and<br/>the creation of a body-positive exhibit. Using qualitative research from experts on fashion<br/>curation, we seek to create, curate and pitch a fashion exhibit. Using the information we gather<br/>from experts from two different museums, we will create a new age exhibit that pushes the<br/>boundaries of fashion as art through our theme of body positivity.

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Date Created
2021-05

Fulfilling a Fashionable Need: A Business Model for ASU’s Fashion and Beauty Publication

Description

Arizona State University presents numerous opportunities beyond the classroom for students of various academic disciplines, such as through organizations and publications. However, there is a demand by students for more extracurricular activities pertaining to the field of fashion. This thesis

Arizona State University presents numerous opportunities beyond the classroom for students of various academic disciplines, such as through organizations and publications. However, there is a demand by students for more extracurricular activities pertaining to the field of fashion. This thesis presents a solution to the dilemma by outlining a business plan for SPARK, a funded and student-led campus fashion and beauty magazine. The content of this paper will discuss the need for an outlet of this nature and the research that was conducted to support this idea, such as the fashion-related opportunities that already exist at ASU, an overview of the university’s current student publications and a comprehensive competitive analysis of fashion magazines from colleges around the nation. A main research component of this creative project was a survey that was distributed as a means of understanding the fashion media interests and consumption habits of ASU students. The results of this study will be discussed, followed by an analysis of how these data played into the organization and planning of the publication. Attached to this dissertation is a business plan comprised of a thorough value proposition, three-year budget, audience insights and more. A sustainable business plan for SPARK, an interdisciplinary and original student-led fashion magazine, will be presented.

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2019-12

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Mapping Sustainable Concepts for Fashion Exhibition Development

Description

This thesis explores the relationship between sustainability, the fashion industry, and fashion exhibitions. Sustainability has been a driving force in the fashion industry in recent years as designers attempt to combat staggering textile waste statistics in order to lessen the

This thesis explores the relationship between sustainability, the fashion industry, and fashion exhibitions. Sustainability has been a driving force in the fashion industry in recent years as designers attempt to combat staggering textile waste statistics in order to lessen the damage the industry has on the environment. Producers must rethink human engagement with nature based on a new ethic of ecosystem stewardship, which proposes that humans have ethical obligations to one another in their mutual relationship with non-human species and nature (Schmitz 13). Enhancing a socio-ecological perspective garners new ways of consuming and appreciating clothing design while focusing on lessening impacts on the environment through using less materials, reusing materials in new textile developments, and projecting a sustainable identity that can be followed by the public in order to be more conscious of spending habits, annual waste, and how sustainably ethical companies are. Removing natural resources or transforming landscapes to enhance human well-being paradoxically stands to diminish human well being over time (Schmitz 12), and this is something that humans face with the inevitability of climate change affecting future generations. In mapping the relationship between sustainability, fashion designer's design process, and the way curators communicate sustainable themes, an overall understanding of sustainable culture can be understood in the industry.

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2020-05

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AN EVALUATION OF SUSTAINABLE CERTIFICATIONS WITHIN THE GLOBAL FASHION INDUSTRY: An analysis of criteria upheld by specific sustainable certifications.

Description

Within the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that the effects of climate change are getting harder and harder to ignore. This fact has led to increased interest in sustainability and an increased pressure from consumers to have these

Within the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that the effects of climate change are getting harder and harder to ignore. This fact has led to increased interest in sustainability and an increased pressure from consumers to have these ideals implemented into a variety of global industries. The fashion industry, in particular, has been facing this pressure toward the desire for sustainable products is the fashion industry. Over the last five years, sustainability has become a main focus within the fashion industry. Countless brands now include sustainability within their marketing tactics and a variety of fashion organizations release reports on the unsustainable practices that currently dominate fashion production. These misleading marketing tactics and enigmatic intensive reports lead to confusion on what sustainable fashion actually looks like for both consumers and suppliers alike.<br/> This report attempts to help tackle this problem by using sustainable fashion certifications as a tactic to prove sustainability within business procedures. To compare eight of the most common fashion certifications, this paper assumes a systems thinking approach to creating an assessment framework, which is then applied to said certifications. To back up the importance of the topic, this paper presents key points of the current issues related to this case, which then contribute to the integration of basic sustainability assessment criteria and case-specific factors into overarching core criteria. The application of this framework is utilized to determine which certifications cover certain aspects of the curated core criteria. This is then used to present consumers and manufacturers with a more accurate understanding of each of these certifications. This information is then followed up with a recommendation of certifications that align most within researched-based consumer and supplier desires.

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2021-05

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An Evaluation of Ageism in the Fashion Industry: Re-Evaluating Norms in Fashion Media

Description

According to Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture, fashion is defined as "the cultural construction of the embodied identity." (Steele 2012). Fashion is a complex subject that utilizes media to instill understanding and the significance of its

According to Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture, fashion is defined as "the cultural construction of the embodied identity." (Steele 2012). Fashion is a complex subject that utilizes media to instill understanding and the significance of its products to consumers through advertisement. It is highly influential on consumers' behaviors and self-image. In this thesis, I provide the historical context of the fashion industry’s media channels that have shaped the perspective and importance of youthful physical features leading to a youth-centric market. It also examines the current practices and representation in media. The insights from this research provide an understanding of how ageism is prevalent in various forms of media and identifies the implications of the perception of older consumers.

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2022-05

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Kelly (Spring 2022)

Description

As a fashion design student with career interest in design and costuming, I decided to design and build a Ready-to-Wear collection for my senior thesis. The steps to build a collection include: concept research, initial concept sketching, create a moodboard

As a fashion design student with career interest in design and costuming, I decided to design and build a Ready-to-Wear collection for my senior thesis. The steps to build a collection include: concept research, initial concept sketching, create a moodboard and colorboard, select textiles/sourcing textiles, finalize sketches, create technical flats, patternmaking and draping, testing and swatching design details (such as embroidery, seam and construction details, finishes/trims), sewing mock-ups/toiles, and finally construct the garments in the fashion fabrics. Due to my collection being featured in the ASU Spring 2022 fashion show there were some additional steps I took to finalize this collection including: model sourcing, fittings, alterations, and hair and makeup conceptualization for the show. I began conceptualizing this collection in the fall of 2021 and began sewing in January 2022. The ASU fashion show was March 26, 2022. I found inspiration for this collection from my love of tattoo art, specifically by the history and imagery of American Traditionalism tattoo art around the turn of the 20th century. As an avid fan of tattoo art, I have become more appreciative of tattooing as a pure form of art and the elements required to have a well done American Traditional style tattoo. Such elements include: contrast, shadows, clean line work, as well as perception/silhouettes. This type of classic tattoo art also involves heavy symbolism, mostly derived from animals and the ocean. An additional concept I am applying to my collection is corsetry, specifically in the style of the early 1900’s. This time period is cohesive with the tattoo era I am focusing on, as well as it is the era that corsetry began to include decorative elements in addition to being for structural and shaping purposes. I began to have an interest in corsetry from my love of complicated construction, as well as costumery. I feel like corsets as an outer layer is a great way to incorporate costumery into a traditional Ready-To-Wear-Collection. I have decided to apply tattoo art in multiple ways to my collection- the first within my colorways. American Traditional tattoo art at the turn of the 20th century only used black, green, yellow, and red ink. I plan to utilize these colors in the corsets only. The modern and classic silhouettes utilized in the base clothing will be in various shades of browns and tans in order to represent skin tones, therefore the corsets are the “tattoos” on the “skin”. The tattoo art will be applied further within the corsets, as I will be using the classic imagery/ symbols as decorative features on the corsets- done possibly with beadwork, embroidery, and paint/ screen printing. I hope to mostly utilize natural fiber-based textile for their sustainability purposes, such as wool and silks. However, any synthetic materials will be sourced from deadstock in order to still hold myself accountable to sustainability.

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Date Created
2022-05

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M. Kelly Show Clip

Description

As a fashion design student with career interest in design and costuming, I decided to design and build a Ready-to-Wear collection for my senior thesis. The steps to build a collection include: concept research, initial concept sketching, create a moodboard

As a fashion design student with career interest in design and costuming, I decided to design and build a Ready-to-Wear collection for my senior thesis. The steps to build a collection include: concept research, initial concept sketching, create a moodboard and colorboard, select textiles/sourcing textiles, finalize sketches, create technical flats, patternmaking and draping, testing and swatching design details (such as embroidery, seam and construction details, finishes/trims), sewing mock-ups/toiles, and finally construct the garments in the fashion fabrics. Due to my collection being featured in the ASU Spring 2022 fashion show there were some additional steps I took to finalize this collection including: model sourcing, fittings, alterations, and hair and makeup conceptualization for the show. I began conceptualizing this collection in the fall of 2021 and began sewing in January 2022. The ASU fashion show was March 26, 2022. I found inspiration for this collection from my love of tattoo art, specifically by the history and imagery of American Traditionalism tattoo art around the turn of the 20th century. As an avid fan of tattoo art, I have become more appreciative of tattooing as a pure form of art and the elements required to have a well done American Traditional style tattoo. Such elements include: contrast, shadows, clean line work, as well as perception/silhouettes. This type of classic tattoo art also involves heavy symbolism, mostly derived from animals and the ocean. An additional concept I am applying to my collection is corsetry, specifically in the style of the early 1900’s. This time period is cohesive with the tattoo era I am focusing on, as well as it is the era that corsetry began to include decorative elements in addition to being for structural and shaping purposes. I began to have an interest in corsetry from my love of complicated construction, as well as costumery. I feel like corsets as an outer layer is a great way to incorporate costumery into a traditional Ready-To-Wear-Collection. I have decided to apply tattoo art in multiple ways to my collection- the first within my colorways. American Traditional tattoo art at the turn of the 20th century only used black, green, yellow, and red ink. I plan to utilize these colors in the corsets only. The modern and classic silhouettes utilized in the base clothing will be in various shades of browns and tans in order to represent skin tones, therefore the corsets are the “tattoos” on the “skin”. The tattoo art will be applied further within the corsets, as I will be using the classic imagery/ symbols as decorative features on the corsets- done possibly with beadwork, embroidery, and paint/ screen printing. I hope to mostly utilize natural fiber-based textile for their sustainability purposes, such as wool and silks. However, any synthetic materials will be sourced from deadstock in order to still hold myself accountable to sustainability.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

"Tatted"- A 5-look Spring/Summer 2022 Ready-to-Wear Collection

Description

As a fashion design student with career interest in design and costuming, I decided to design and build a Ready-to-Wear collection for my senior thesis. The steps to build a collection include: concept research, initial concept sketching, create a moodboard

As a fashion design student with career interest in design and costuming, I decided to design and build a Ready-to-Wear collection for my senior thesis. The steps to build a collection include: concept research, initial concept sketching, create a moodboard and colorboard, select textiles/sourcing textiles, finalize sketches, create technical flats, patternmaking and draping, testing and swatching design details (such as embroidery, seam and construction details, finishes/trims), sewing mock-ups/toiles, and finally construct the garments in the fashion fabrics. Due to my collection being featured in the ASU Spring 2022 fashion show there were some additional steps I took to finalize this collection including: model sourcing, fittings, alterations, and hair and makeup conceptualization for the show. I began conceptualizing this collection in the fall of 2021 and began sewing in January 2022. The ASU fashion show was March 26, 2022. I found inspiration for this collection from my love of tattoo art, specifically by the history and imagery of American Traditionalism tattoo art around the turn of the 20th century. As an avid fan of tattoo art, I have become more appreciative of tattooing as a pure form of art and the elements required to have a well done American Traditional style tattoo. Such elements include: contrast, shadows, clean line work, as well as perception/silhouettes. This type of classic tattoo art also involves heavy symbolism, mostly derived from animals and the ocean. An additional concept I am applying to my collection is corsetry, specifically in the style of the early 1900’s. This time period is cohesive with the tattoo era I am focusing on, as well as it is the era that corsetry began to include decorative elements in addition to being for structural and shaping purposes. I began to have an interest in corsetry from my love of complicated construction, as well as costumery. I feel like corsets as an outer layer is a great way to incorporate costumery into a traditional Ready-To-Wear-Collection. I have decided to apply tattoo art in multiple ways to my collection- the first within my colorways. American Traditional tattoo art at the turn of the 20th century only used black, green, yellow, and red ink. I plan to utilize these colors in the corsets only. The modern and classic silhouettes utilized in the base clothing will be in various shades of browns and tans in order to represent skin tones, therefore the corsets are the “tattoos” on the “skin”. The tattoo art will be applied further within the corsets, as I will be using the classic imagery/ symbols as decorative features on the corsets- done possibly with beadwork, embroidery, and paint/ screen printing. I hope to mostly utilize natural fiber-based textile for their sustainability purposes, such as wool and silks. However, any synthetic materials will be sourced from deadstock in order to still hold myself accountable to sustainability.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05