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My PTPro App - Circadian Health

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Physical therapy patients still receive their plan of care onto a piece of paper when there are hundreds of engaging physical therapy exercise videos on the internet. These exercise videos are way more appealing to watch and physical therapists should

Physical therapy patients still receive their plan of care onto a piece of paper when there are hundreds of engaging physical therapy exercise videos on the internet. These exercise videos are way more appealing to watch and physical therapists should consider delivering Home Exercise Programs (HEP) digitally. There are apps and online services such as Physioadvisor, Physprac app, Anterior Cruciate Ligament repair app, and work-out apps for people to create their own plan of care and are easily accessible with any electronic device. Most people are receiving information and learning through a lit screen anyways so it may only be a matter of time before people start using these resources instead of a physical therapist. Physical Therapists need to provide better resources for their patients and an app may be all they need. Figures of the results of the Qualtrics survey both Physical Therapists and Patient responses and were provided. A data analysis of each question and responses were interpreted to determine whether patients and physical therapists would like to use a physical therapy app as part of their rehab program. A Physiotherapy research journal with Switzerland researchers conducted a case study in a hospital and determined whether a HEP app testing was effective for patients to utilize.

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2020-05

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Contributing to a meta-analysis on the effects of acute physical exercise on the executive functions of preadolescent children, adolescents and adults

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The purpose of this study, originally, was to contribute to the completion of a meta-analysis conducted by Mara Wierstra from the University of Virginia. Wierstra had requested individual participant data from two separate studies conducted in our lab: "Acute bouts

The purpose of this study, originally, was to contribute to the completion of a meta-analysis conducted by Mara Wierstra from the University of Virginia. Wierstra had requested individual participant data from two separate studies conducted in our lab: "Acute bouts of assisted cycling improves cognitive and upper extremity movement functions in adolescents with Down syndrome" and "Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) improves inhibition in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder." From the data requested, the participants were required to complete three separate tests (i.e., Tower of London, Trail Making Task and the Stroop Test). After compiling the data and sending it to her, we decided to conduct a small meta-analysis of our own, drawing connecting conclusions from the data from the two studies. We concluded that observationally our data suggest an advantage for ACT over voluntary cycling and no cycling across two separate populations (i.e., Autism Spectrum Disorder and Down syndrome), and across different measures of executive function (i.e., Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, and Tower of London). The data suggest that the ACT interventions may promote the upregulation of neurotropic factors leading to neurogenesis in the prefrontal cortex of the brain.

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2016-12