Matching Items (23)

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Close as Lips and Teeth: How China Refuses Obligations to North Korean Refugees

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The North Korean refugee crisis is a long-standing political issue that has persisted since the Korean War, resulting in thousands of North Koreans fleeing each year. However, despite its persistent nature, both the Chinese government and the international community have

The North Korean refugee crisis is a long-standing political issue that has persisted since the Korean War, resulting in thousands of North Koreans fleeing each year. However, despite its persistent nature, both the Chinese government and the international community have failed to alleviate systematic migratory issues resulting from Chinese policy towards the refugees. This essay aims to analyze Chinese policy towards the North Korean refugee crisis, specifically through its categorization of North Koreans as “economic migrants” rather than refugees. After reviewing both the conditions within North Korea that cause refugee flight and the pathways of escape through China, the paper shows that China is violating multiple parts of international refugee law as set up by the 1951 Refugee Convention, such as issues of non-refoulement and discrimination. Additionally, I argue that North Koreans are refugees in the traditional definition and refugees sur place. Similarly, this paper discusses the historical and political reasoning for Chinese policy towards refugees in the context of its economic and security relationship with the North Korean state, as well as the implications of the relationships for North Korean refugees. From this, the resilient nature of the crisis is established, as well as the notable security obstacles that must be navigated and incorporated in any feasible solutions. Finally, this paper proposes possible solutions to the crisis, such as moving away from “defector” terminology, linking international policy to refugee outcomes, structuring refugee law around global burden-sharing rather than regional prioritizations, and expanding the definition of refugee to more accurately reflect causes of displacement in Asia.

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2020-05

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A Story of Resettlement

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In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the last seven months we worked with a Rwandan refugee to

In April of 1994, a genocide broke out in Rwanda that lasted about 100 days and killed approximately 800,000 men, women, and children (Krain, 2005). Over the course of the last seven months we worked with a Rwandan refugee to bring this project to fruition. This refugee inspired us to show the personal side of the issue of resettlement and we believed that she would be able to make an impact on others if we could share her story. The purpose of this project was to record this refugees story of resettlement in America. As mentioned above, we wanted to share their powerful journey from Rwanda to America. We believed that by introducing a personal story to a relatively impersonal matter we would bring more understanding to this issue. We wanted to create a project that could not only be a source of education, but also have a personal aspect that would inspire many to learn more and get involved with issues that are important to them. We believed creating this short film would be the best way we could have this story reach more people. Over these seven months, we created a short film that told the story of the Rwandan genocide and the American resettlement process from the unique perspective of someone who has experienced both.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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International Refugees in London, England: Post-2016 European Union Referendum

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International refugees have continuously shaped the identity of modern London, England, creating a diverse cityscape. However, the referendum in June 2016 indicated a perceived desire of the majority of United Kingdom (UK) citizens to leave the European Union (EU) and

International refugees have continuously shaped the identity of modern London, England, creating a diverse cityscape. However, the referendum in June 2016 indicated a perceived desire of the majority of United Kingdom (UK) citizens to leave the European Union (EU) and the domination of far-right, anti-immigrant rhetoric in British politics. These elements have given rise to the question of how refugees will find belonging in a geographical space that continues to create borders at both a national and borough level. As the Brexit vote still stands, barriers to applying for refugee status and successful resettlement could increase - complicating the lives of refugees wanting to resettle in the UK. Urban spaces such as London, Manchester, and Birmingham have transformed into places where the lives of the British cross daily with the lives of those forcibly removed from their home state. With minimal current research on the relationship between international refugees in London and the current social and political identity of the city, post-Brexit vote, I believe there is a gap in understanding to be filled. This gap includes defining the relationship between place, people, and politics in the context of the city of London as well as the boroughs that comprise the city. In addition, this research explores the future of London as a place at a borough-level and aims to understand how the idea of borders and nationalism have been uncovered and subsequently amplified through the referendum. The following paper includes data collected from British refugee agencies and inhabitants of five London boroughs that will add to existing research in the form of academic and professional journals and published reports produced by refugee agencies and the British government in hopes to identify the current nature of the relationship between international refugees and Londoners and how this relationship might shift in the future.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Barriers Refugee Women Face When Accessing Healthcare: A Review of Current Available Solutions

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Currently, refugee women’s access to healthcare is a major topic of research. Refugee women face many barriers when attempting to access healthcare, and this paper aims to complete a systematic review of the results of studies published from 2009 to

Currently, refugee women’s access to healthcare is a major topic of research. Refugee women face many barriers when attempting to access healthcare, and this paper aims to complete a systematic review of the results of studies published from 2009 to 2019 that investigate what specific best solutions have been put in place globally to combat struggles refugee women face while trying to obtain healthcare, identify common underlying themes, and see how these solutions can be applied to countries caring for refugees. Twelve total articles were reviewed and four main themes emerged: women’s care, mental health, health professional perspective, and community. From these four main themes, three crucial ideas emerged: culturally competent care, team-based care, and trust between patient and provider. The results showed that to improve access to healthcare for refugee women: health professionals must receive cultural sensitivity training to provide culturally competent care, team-based care must be implemented to improve patient adherence and satisfaction, and trust between the patient and provider is key to allowing refugee women feel safe enough to seek out healthcare. Culturally competent team-based care based on physician-patient trust needs to be more thoroughly adapted globally to provide care that is sensitive and empowering for refugee women, and all patients. However, these strategies will need to be further studied to determine their impact on refugee women’s health literacy & healthcare experience.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The adversarial impacts of protracted refugee situations on refugee protection and camp security,: a case for local integration in Lebanon

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Protracted Refugee Situations (PRS) are of serious concern due to their adverse impacts on human rights and stability in host countries. This thesis profiles three, so-called, durable solutions for refugees: local integration, third country resettlement, and voluntary repatriation. However,

Protracted Refugee Situations (PRS) are of serious concern due to their adverse impacts on human rights and stability in host countries. This thesis profiles three, so-called, durable solutions for refugees: local integration, third country resettlement, and voluntary repatriation. However, refugees living in PRS are not given any durable solutions, and they remain confined to refugee camps while the conflicts that forced them from their homelands continue. Refugees usually find themselves in PRS as a result of the restrictive policies of the country in which they have sought refuge. These conditions not only deprive refugees of basic human rights, but act as catalysts for political violence, insurgency, and radicalization. This thesis examines, in detail, one such case: Nahr al-Bared, a Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon where refugees have been living in PRS for decades due to stringent refugee policies that contributed to violent clashes that took place in May 2007. The denial of human rights for Palestinians in Lebanon has effectively marginalized already disempowered refugee populations, thereby increasing the likelihood of instability and radicalization. The denial of rights, a lack of opportunities, and confinement to the poor conditions of the refugee camp, are driving forces of political violence and militant rhetoric. This situation can endanger the refugee host country as well as the refugees, who are civilians in need of international protection. Therefore, there is a strong connection between the inclusion of rights for refugee populations in a host country, and peace and security. The case of Palestinians in Lebanon is examined as a microcosm of the notion that human rights and state security are interdependent. Recognition of this interdependence necessitates a paradigm shift in perspectives and policies of international refugee protection and state security, from regarding PRS as an indefinite state of emergency to be contained, to acknowledgment that the indefinite duty to protect refugees in protracted situations simultaneously serves the host country's security concerns.

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2010

Barriers to Refugee Participation in Higher Education: A cross-national solution to enhance English acquisition for refugees in Israel

Description

In this formative research project, we seek to better understand the general barriers to refugee access to higher education. Using mixed methods research--which included surveys, interviews, and course data--we evaluate the benefits and challenges experienced by refugee students in Israel

In this formative research project, we seek to better understand the general barriers to refugee access to higher education. Using mixed methods research--which included surveys, interviews, and course data--we evaluate the benefits and challenges experienced by refugee students in Israel who are enrolled in Arizona State University's Education for Humanity programs. In the end, this case study resulted in 24 recommend programmatic changes designed to eliminate the barriers that prevent refugee students from accessing and succeeding in higher education.

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2021-05

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Asylum in the United States and the European Union: Legal and Systemic Challenges from a Decade of Deterrence Policy

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Over the past decade, the United States and the European Union have adopted major changes to asylum policy and enforcement, specifically the increase of deterrence policies contrary to international asylum norms. The goal of this has been to reduce the

Over the past decade, the United States and the European Union have adopted major changes to asylum policy and enforcement, specifically the increase of deterrence policies contrary to international asylum norms. The goal of this has been to reduce the pull factors towards the US and EU. Deterrence policies have largely been characterized by two main strategies: (1) deterrence at the border through stricter regulations and detention policies, and (2) deterrence through the creation of formal buffer zone countries between the asylum seekers’ countries of origin and the ultimate country of destination. These policies have been instituted in response to the spike in Central American asylum seekers at the US/Mexico border and Syrian asylum seekers at the Greece/Turkey border at the entrance of the EU. This paper compares these two separate geographic areas––the US and EU––due to their roles in the development of international law, their roles in the development and management of these crises, and the similar increase of asylum seekers in 2014-15. This paper also details the severity of the conditions in the asylee-sending areas––Central America and Syria––which are major “push factors” driving the crises. Finally, this paper explores the novel use of Mexico and Turkey as formal buffer zones by the United Staes and the European Union, respectively. The increase of deterrence policies culminating in the creation of formal buffer zones countries violates key principles of international asylum law, namely non-refoulement. These buffer zones must be redesigned proactively to better suit the realities of asylum in the 21st century.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Beyond Numbers: Assessing the Impact of RISE Tutoring on the Phoenix Refugee Community

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RISE Tutoring is an ASU student organization which helps refugee youth achieve academic and personal success through tutoring and mentorship. As a member of RISE Tutoring for three years, the researcher sought to document and analyze the program’s impact on

RISE Tutoring is an ASU student organization which helps refugee youth achieve academic and personal success through tutoring and mentorship. As a member of RISE Tutoring for three years, the researcher sought to document and analyze the program’s impact on the Phoenix refugee community. It was determined that video documentation, with its ability to capture both visual and verbal testimony, was the ideal holistic approach to assess and share this impact. The researcher hypothesized that RISE Tutoring adds value to the lives of its tutors and students through the multidimensional growth––educational, personal, and cultural––it facilitates for all. Methods of data collection were limited to video and audio, but approval from the Institutional Review Board and consent from all participants were obtained prior to the project’s start. The final video, filmed and edited with the help of a professional videographer, was 20 minutes and 21 seconds in length. The findings derived from the recorded interviews with students, tutors, and community leaders, and from the footage of tutoring and group activities, validated the researcher’s hypothesis. Viewers of the video can witness the bonding of tutors and students; hear the pride in the voices of the tutors and see the passion in their eyes when they speak of their students; and feel the joy and excitement that the program brings to its students’ lives. This project transformed the personal experiences of participants into a collective RISE Tutoring identity which can now be presented, for the first time, to the public. The video also aimed to help RISE Tutoring share its meaningful work and improve its marketing efforts, thereby enabling the organization to recruit more tutors and students, build new partnerships, and fundraise. Through the fulfillment of these goals, the video will empower the organization to effect greater change in the community.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Vanguards of Global Justice: Organizing Support for Unaccompanied Refugee Minors

Description

This document reviews social and legal issues with Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URMs) as they interact with different government agencies and non-profit organizations. It also explores ideas that have been proposed to improve policies regarding URM placement and government agency reporting

This document reviews social and legal issues with Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URMs) as they interact with different government agencies and non-profit organizations. It also explores ideas that have been proposed to improve policies regarding URM placement and government agency reporting processes. The service quality of Unaccompanied Refugee Minor (URM) programs should be recorded to study the return on investment for URMs and the outcome of their long-term social development. Tracking the development of these youths would help with analyzing the effectiveness of state, federal and nonprofit programs in facilitating URM assimilation in the United States. This document demonstrates different ways to improve governmental and nonprofit policies to better serve the welfare of URMs.

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Date Created
2018-12

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Dissecting the State and Non-State Role in Refugee Integration: Mapping out of Federal, State and Non-Profit Organizational Roles in Arizona

Description

This paper examines the role of refugee resettlement and integration agencies on a federal, state, and nonstate level, and the role they each play in facilitating effective refugee integration. Wars, poverty, and political unrest have all contributed to creating the

This paper examines the role of refugee resettlement and integration agencies on a federal, state, and nonstate level, and the role they each play in facilitating effective refugee integration. Wars, poverty, and political unrest have all contributed to creating the largest number of refugees in history. An important step in beginning to resolve this refugee crisis is to offer the victims a chance at rebuilding their lives. Every State in the international community has a responsibility to resettle those who have been displaced. It is important to understand the process of refugee resettlement and integration, and the organizations involved, which I map out and then assess what area of refugee integration plays the most important role, and how organizations on every level work together to provide the greatest amount of resources possible. I then evaluate any gaps and problems in the refugee integration system.

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Date Created
2019-05