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Cost-effective integrated wireless monitoring of wafer cleanliness using SOI technology

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The thesis focuses on cost-efficient integration of the electro-chemical residue sensor (ECRS), a novel sensor developed for the in situ and real-time measurement of the residual impurities left on the wafer surface and in the fine structures of patterned wafers

The thesis focuses on cost-efficient integration of the electro-chemical residue sensor (ECRS), a novel sensor developed for the in situ and real-time measurement of the residual impurities left on the wafer surface and in the fine structures of patterned wafers during typical rinse processes, and wireless transponder circuitry that is based on RFID technology. The proposed technology uses only the NMOS FD-SOI transistors with amorphous silicon as active material with silicon nitride as a gate dielectric. The proposed transistor was simulated under the SILVACO ATLAS Simulation Framework. A parametric study was performed to study the impact of different gate lengths (6 μm to 56 μm), electron motilities (0.1 cm2/Vs to 1 cm2/Vs), gate dielectric (SiO2 and SiNx) and active materials (a-Si and poly-Si) specifications. Level-1 models, that are accurate enough to acquire insight into the circuit behavior and perform preliminary design, were successfully constructed by analyzing drain current and gate to node capacitance characteristics against drain to source and gate to source voltages. Using the model corresponding to SiNx as gate dielectric, a-Si:H as active material with electron mobility equal to 0.4 cm2/V-sec, an operational amplifier was designed and was tested in unity gain configuration at modest load-frequency specifications.

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Date Created
2010

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A 1.2V 25MSPS pipelined ADC using split CLS with Op-amp sharing

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ABSTRACT As the technology length shrinks down, achieving higher gain is becoming very difficult in deep sub-micron technologies. As the supply voltages drop, cascodes are very difficult to implement and cascade amplifiers are needed to achieve sufficient gain with required

ABSTRACT As the technology length shrinks down, achieving higher gain is becoming very difficult in deep sub-micron technologies. As the supply voltages drop, cascodes are very difficult to implement and cascade amplifiers are needed to achieve sufficient gain with required output swing. This sets the fundamental limit on the SNR and hence the maximum resolution that can be achieved by ADC. With the RSD algorithm and the range overlap, the sub ADC can tolerate large comparator offsets leaving the linearity and accuracy requirement for the DAC and residue gain stage. Typically, the multiplying DAC requires high gain wide bandwidth op-amp and the design of this high gain op-amp becomes challenging in the deep submicron technologies. This work presents `A 12 bit 25MSPS 1.2V pipelined ADC using split CLS technique' in IBM 130nm 8HP process using only CMOS devices for the application of Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CLS technique relaxes the gain requirement of op-amp and improves the signal-to-noise ratio without increase in power or input sampling capacitor with rail-to-rail swing. An op-amp sharing technique has been incorporated with split CLS technique which decreases the number of op-amps and hence the power further. Entire pipelined converter has been implemented as six 2.5 bit RSD stages and hence decreases the latency associated with the pipelined architecture - one of the main requirements for LHC along with the power requirement. Two different OTAs have been designed to use in the split-CLS technique. Bootstrap switches and pass gate switches are used in the circuit along with a low power dynamic kick-back compensated comparator.

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2012

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Design of a modified Cherry-Hooper transimpedance amplifier with DC offset cancellation

Description

Optical receivers have many different uses covering simple infrared receivers, high speed fiber optic communication and light based instrumentation. All of them have an optical receiver that converts photons to current followed by a transimpedance amplifier to convert the current

Optical receivers have many different uses covering simple infrared receivers, high speed fiber optic communication and light based instrumentation. All of them have an optical receiver that converts photons to current followed by a transimpedance amplifier to convert the current to a useful voltage. Different systems create different requirements for each receiver. High speed digital communication require high throughput with enough sensitivity to keep the bit error rate low. Instrumentation receivers have a lower bandwidth, but higher gain and sensitivity requirements. In this thesis an optical receiver for use in instrumentation in presented. It is an entirely monolithic design with the photodiodes on the same substrate as the CMOS circuitry. This allows for it to be built into a focal-plane array, but it places some restriction on the area. It is also designed for in-situ testing and must be able to cancel any low frequency noise caused by ambient light. The area restrictions prohibit the use of a DC blocking capacitor to reject the low frequency noise. In place a servo loop was wrapped around the system to reject any DC offset. A modified Cherry-Hooper architecture was used for the transimpedance amplifier. This provides the flexibility to create an amplifier with high gain and wide bandwidth that is independent of the input capacitance. The downside is the increased complexity of the design makes stability paramount to the design. Another drawback is the high noise associated with low input impedance that decouples the input capacitance from the bandwidth. This problem is compounded by the servo loop feed which leaves the output noise of some amplifiers directly referred to the input. An in depth analysis of each circuit block's noise contribution is presented.

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2011

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A 500MSPs bipolar SiGe track and hold circuit with high SFDR

Description

The front end of almost all ADCs consists of a Sample and Hold Circuit in order to make sure a constant analog value is digitized at the end of ADC. The design of Track and Hold Circuit (THA) mainly focuses

The front end of almost all ADCs consists of a Sample and Hold Circuit in order to make sure a constant analog value is digitized at the end of ADC. The design of Track and Hold Circuit (THA) mainly focuses on following parameters: Input frequency, Sampling frequency, dynamic Range, hold pedestal, feed through error. This thesis will discuss the importance of these parameters of a THA to the ADCs and commonly used architectures of THA. A new architecture with SiGe HBT transistors in BiCMOS 130 nm technology is presented here. The proposed topology without complicated circuitry achieves high Spurious Free Dynamic Range(SFDR) and Total Harmonic Distortion (THD).These are important figure of merits for any THA which gives a measure of non-linearity of the circuit. The proposed topology is implemented in IBM8HP 130 nm BiCMOS process combines typical emitter follower switch in bipolar THAs and output steering technique proposed in the previous work. With these techniques and the cascode transistor in the input which is used to isolate the switch from the input during the hold mode, better results have been achieved. The THA is designed to work with maximum input frequency of 250 MHz at sampling frequency of 500 MHz with input currents not more than 5mA achieving an SFDR of 78.49 dB. Simulation and results are presented, illustrating the advantages and trade-offs of the proposed topology.

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2012

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Experimental study of MOS capacitors as wireless radiation dose sensors

Description

The RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistor (RADFET) has been conventionally used to measure radiation dose levels. These dose sensors are calibrated in such a way that a shift in threshold voltage, due to a build-up of oxide-trapped charge, can be

The RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistor (RADFET) has been conventionally used to measure radiation dose levels. These dose sensors are calibrated in such a way that a shift in threshold voltage, due to a build-up of oxide-trapped charge, can be used to estimate the radiation dose. In order to estimate the radiation dose level using RADFET, a wired readout circuit is necessary. Using the same principle of oxide-trapped charge build-up, but by monitoring the change in capacitance instead of threshold voltage, a wireless dose sensor can be developed. This RADiation sensitive CAPacitor (RADCAP) mounted on a resonant patch antenna can then become a wireless dose sensor. From the resonant frequency, the capacitance can be extracted which can be mapped back to estimate the radiation dose level. The capacitor acts as both radiation dose sensor and resonator element in the passive antenna loop. Since the MOS capacitor is used in passive state, characterizing various parameters that affect the radiation sensitivity is essential. Oxide processing technique, choice of insulator material, and thickness of the insulator, critically affect the dose response of the sensor. A thicker oxide improves the radiation sensitivity but reduces the dynamic range of dose levels for which the sensor can be used. The oxide processing scheme primarily determines the interface trap charge and oxide-trapped charge development; controlling this parameter is critical to building a better dose sensor.

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2010

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Static behavior of chalcogenide based programmable metallization cells

Description

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while having maximal speed, capacity, retention time, and radiation hardness. A

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while having maximal speed, capacity, retention time, and radiation hardness. A promising candidate for next-generation memory is ion-conducting bridging RAM which is referred to as programmable metallization cell (PMC), conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM), or electrochemical metallization memory (ECM), which is likely to surpass flash memory in all the ideal memory characteristics. A comprehensive physics-based model is needed to completely understand PMC operation and assist in design optimization.

To advance the PMC modeling effort, this thesis presents a precise physical model parameterizing materials associated with both ion-rich and ion-poor layers of the PMC's solid electrolyte, so that captures the static electrical behavior of the PMC in both its low-resistance on-state (LRS) and high resistance off-state (HRS). The experimental data is measured from a chalcogenide glass PMC designed and manufactured at ASU. The static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code written in Silvaco Atlas finite element analysis software. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

The sensitivity of our modeled PMC to the variation of its prominent achieved material parameters is examined on the HRS and LRS impedance behavior.

The obtained accurate set of material parameters for both Ag-rich and Ag-poor ChG systems and process variation verification on electrical characteristics enables greater fidelity in PMC device simulation, which significantly enhances our ability to understand the underlying physics of ChG-based resistive switching memory.

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Date Created
2014

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Digital calibration and prediction of effective number of bits for pipeline ADC

Description

In thesis, a test time reduction (a low cost test) methodology for digitally-calibrated pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) is presented. A long calibration time is required in the final test to validate performance of these designs. To reduce total test time,

In thesis, a test time reduction (a low cost test) methodology for digitally-calibrated pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) is presented. A long calibration time is required in the final test to validate performance of these designs. To reduce total test time, optimized calibration technique and calibrated effective number of bits (ENOB) prediction from calibration coefficient will be presented. With the prediction technique, failed devices can be identified only without actual calibration. This technique reduces significant amount of time for the total test time.

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Date Created
2013

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Flash sharing in a time-interleaved pipeline ADC

Description

With the advent of parallel processing, primarily the time-interleaved pipeline ADCs, high speed and high resolution ADCs became a possibility. When these speeds touch giga samples per second and resolutions go beyond 12-bits, the parallelization becomes more extensive leading to

With the advent of parallel processing, primarily the time-interleaved pipeline ADCs, high speed and high resolution ADCs became a possibility. When these speeds touch giga samples per second and resolutions go beyond 12-bits, the parallelization becomes more extensive leading to repeated presence of several identical blocks in the architecture. This thesis discusses one such block, the sub-ADC (Flash ADC), of the pipeline and sharing it with more than two of the parallel processing channels thereby reducing area and power and input load capacitance to each stage. This work presents a design of 'sub-ADC shared in a time-interleaved pipeline ADC' in the IBM 8HP process. It has been implemented with an offset-compensated, kickback-compensated, fast decision making (large input bandwidth) and low power comparator that forms the core part of the design.

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Date Created
2013

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Reliable arithmetic circuit design inspired by SNP systems

Description

ABSTRACT Developing new non-traditional device models is gaining popularity as the silicon-based electrical device approaches its limitation when it scales down. Membrane systems, also called P systems, are a new class of biological computation model inspired by the way cells

ABSTRACT Developing new non-traditional device models is gaining popularity as the silicon-based electrical device approaches its limitation when it scales down. Membrane systems, also called P systems, are a new class of biological computation model inspired by the way cells process chemical signals. Spiking Neural P systems (SNP systems), a certain kind of membrane systems, is inspired by the way the neurons in brain interact using electrical spikes. Compared to the traditional Boolean logic, SNP systems not only perform similar functions but also provide a more promising solution for reliable computation. Two basic neuron types, Low Pass (LP) neurons and High Pass (HP) neurons, are introduced. These two basic types of neurons are capable to build an arbitrary SNP neuron. This leads to the conclusion that these two basic neuron types are Turing complete since SNP systems has been proved Turing complete. These two basic types of neurons are further used as the elements to construct general-purpose arithmetic circuits, such as adder, subtractor and comparator. In this thesis, erroneous behaviors of neurons are discussed. Transmission error (spike loss) is proved to be equivalent to threshold error, which makes threshold error discussion more universal. To improve the reliability, a new structure called motif is proposed. Compared to Triple Modular Redundancy improvement, motif design presents its efficiency and effectiveness in both single neuron and arithmetic circuit analysis. DRAM-based CMOS circuits are used to implement the two basic types of neurons. Functionality of basic type neurons is proved using the SPICE simulations. The motif improved adder and the comparator, as compared to conventional Boolean logic design, are much more reliable with lower leakage, and smaller silicon area. This leads to the conclusion that SNP system could provide a more promising solution for reliable computation than the conventional Boolean logic.

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Date Created
2013

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Testing of threshold logic latch based hybrid circuits

Description

The advent of threshold logic simplifies the traditional Boolean logic to the single level multi-input function. Threshold logic latch (TLL), among implementations of threshold logic, is functionally equivalent to a multi-input function with an edge triggered flip-flop, which stands out

The advent of threshold logic simplifies the traditional Boolean logic to the single level multi-input function. Threshold logic latch (TLL), among implementations of threshold logic, is functionally equivalent to a multi-input function with an edge triggered flip-flop, which stands out to improve area and both dynamic and leakage power consumption, providing an appropriate design alternative. Accordingly, the TLL standard cell library is designed. Through technology mapping, hybrid circuit is generated by absorbing the logic cone backward from each flip-flip to get the smallest remaining feeder. With the scan test methodology adopted, design for testability (DFT) is proposed, including scan element design and scan chain insertion. Test synthesis flow is then introduced, according to the Cadence tool, RTL compiler. Test application is the process of applying vectors and the response analysis, which is mainly about the testbench design. A parameterized generic self-checking Verilog testbench is designed for static fault detection. Test development refers to the fault modeling, and test generation. Firstly, functional truth table test generation on TLL cells is proposed. Before the truth table test of the threshold function, the dependence of sequence of vectors applied, i.e., the dependence of current state on the previous state, should be eliminated. Transition test (dynamic pattern) on all weak inputs is proved to be able to test the reset function, which is supposed to erase the history in the reset phase before every evaluation phase. Remaining vectors in the truth table except the weak inputs are then applied statically (static pattern). Secondly, dynamic patterns for all weak inputs are proposed to detect structural transistor level faults analyzed in the TLL cell, with single fault assumption and stuck-at faults, stuck-on faults, and stuck-open faults under consideration. Containing those patterns, the functional test covers all testable structural faults inside the TLL. Thirdly, with the scope of the whole hybrid netlist, the procedure of test generation is proposed with three steps: scan chain test; test of feeders and other scan elements except TLLs; functional pattern test of TLL cells. Implementation of this procedure is discussed in the automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) chapter.

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2013