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Making a Name for the CounterAct Initiative at ASU

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The backlash surrounding sexual violence in the media (social and traditional) demonstrates support for the fight against sexual violence, and, according to statistics, ASU is home to large populations of some of the most high-risk groups. As a place of

The backlash surrounding sexual violence in the media (social and traditional) demonstrates support for the fight against sexual violence, and, according to statistics, ASU is home to large populations of some of the most high-risk groups. As a place of higher education, ASU recognizes that a proactive approach to sexual misconduct, educating at-risk publics, is as necessary as spreading awareness of the problem. It also acknowledges the healing power of the arts. Acts of sexual violence target the human body and performance arts, like dance, focus on control over body movements. Additionally, art in general is proven to improve one's physical, mental and emotional well-being. Even though the stigma of being a victim of sexual assault has been lessened by people sharing their stories through social and traditional media, sexual assault is traumatizing for the victim. This can lead victims to be hesitant to report or talk about their past trauma, and creates a barrier to discussion of sexual violence on campus. Thus, the goal of CounterAct is to raise awareness of the prevalence of sexual misconduct on campus and throughout American culture. Recognizing the factors that contribute to sexual assault in addition to healing through creative action can change rape culture to respect culture on campus and in the surrounding community.

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2018-05

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Walt Disney World College Program Cast Members: Influencers or Influenced?

Description

This study examines the The Disney College Program, a semester-long paid internship hosted by the Walt Disney Company employing more than 10,000 students each year. With over 120,000 alumni in the past 10 years, this program offers students housing and

This study examines the The Disney College Program, a semester-long paid internship hosted by the Walt Disney Company employing more than 10,000 students each year. With over 120,000 alumni in the past 10 years, this program offers students housing and community building opportunities within the "Living" component, college credit courses within the "Learning" component, and on-the-job experience at Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World theme parks through the "Earning" component. Specifically, the research focuses on Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida. The researcher conducted a 39-question online survey prompting 1,749 responses from Disney College Program alumni to help answer the following research questions: (1) Who are Disney College Program Cast Members, (2) What is their level of satisfaction with the program, and (3) Are they influencers? This study uses theoretical elements (e.g. levels of adoption, influencers and brand loyalty) to describe influence and psychological effects to describe satisfaction (e.g. indoctrination, human motivation and Stockholm Syndrome). With the findings showing discrepancies between the ratings of "Living," "Learning," and "Earning" and the average overall rating, some questions arise about the program's tendencies to form tightly cohesive groups approaching elements of Stockholm Syndrome and cult-like ethos. Focusing on the 1,490 of 1,749 respondents from Walt Disney World in the past 10 years, the study concludes that Walt Disney World College Program alumni are not influencers nor advocates, but rather evangelists (i.e., zealous advocate) and loyalists.

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2018-05

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Analyzing Communication Strategies and Brand Perception at Arizona State University

Description

Starting in 2002, Arizona State University (ASU) began a rebranding effort to transition from having a reputation as a top 10 party school to being known as a prestigious research institution. Over the last 15 years, ASU has successfully reached

Starting in 2002, Arizona State University (ASU) began a rebranding effort to transition from having a reputation as a top 10 party school to being known as a prestigious research institution. Over the last 15 years, ASU has successfully reached some of these goals, eventually being named the #1 most innovative university in the country by the U.S. News and World Report. Part of this success can be attributed to the university's communication and marketing efforts, which seek to improve the university's reputation and build relationships with stakeholders. This study analyzes ASU's communication entities, how they interact and what messages they push out to stakeholders, particularly in regards to the #1 in innovation award. Primary research in this study looked at keywords used by different stakeholder groups affiliated with ASU, how they viewed ASU's reputation and how they receive communication from the university. Overall, the closer the relationship with ASU, the more positively the respondent viewed the university. Perception also varied based on geographic location and proximity to the university. Innovation is clearly a key brand perception of ASU from stakeholders, and the party school image is still persistent among those not affiliated with the university.

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Date Created
2017-05

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Exploring the Evolution of PR-Media Relations in the Past Twenty Years

Description

INTRODUCTION: This thesis delves into how PR-media relations evolved in the past 20 years (since 1997). It discusses several aspects of media relations, such as relationships, old and new media relations tools, pitching and predictions about the future of media

INTRODUCTION: This thesis delves into how PR-media relations evolved in the past 20 years (since 1997). It discusses several aspects of media relations, such as relationships, old and new media relations tools, pitching and predictions about the future of media relations. LITERATURE REVIEW: A review of previous literature on media relations guided this research. Past research explained stigmas about the relationship between public relations professionals and journalists, how pitching has evolved, social media's role in modern day media relations and the dynamic between earned and owned media. METHODOLOGY: The research involved a mixed method approach with qualitative and quantitative methods. First, in-depth interviews were conducted with both journalists and public relations professionals who work in Arizona. These interviews were conducted either in-person or over the phone. Second, two in-depth interviews were conducted over the phone with a public relations professional who worked at Intel for over 20 years for a case study. Finally, a survey was distributed to public relations professionals in Arizona via email and through social media websites (Facebook and Twitter) to provide insight on the media relations tactics they have recently utilized, as well as their use of social media. There were also five follow-up interviews conducted with survey respondents. FINDINGS: After conducting these three methods of research, the qualitative (quotes) and quantitative (survey) data were analyzed to provide detailed opinions about media relations including: the relationships between public relations professionals and the media, the use of old and new media relations tools, what an effective pitch looks like, the use of social media, comparisons between less and more experienced PR professionals, and predictions on the future of media relations. DISCUSSION: The findings from this research led to several conclusions regarding media relations such as: the importance of maintaining a trusting and respectful relationship, traditional tools' place in modern day media relations, email's dominance as a media relations tool, the hesitation by PR professionals to use social media as a communication tool with journalists, more experienced PR professionals' lack of hesitation to use social media as a communication tool with journalists, and the prediction that relationships will remain key in media relations despite the changes in media relations tools themselves. CONCLUSION: Based on all of the findings from this research, it was concluded that media relations has evolved to keep up with the changing media landscape, however, traditional tools and practices remain relevant and essential to media relations.

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Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Used, Leased and Bought: Marketing Cars to the Millennial Generation

Description

The automotive industry is a staple of the U.S. economy, an international job generator and a leader in research and innovation. Cars have symbolized freedom and independence for generations. But to Millennials, they represent additional payments and crowded parking lots.

The automotive industry is a staple of the U.S. economy, an international job generator and a leader in research and innovation. Cars have symbolized freedom and independence for generations. But to Millennials, they represent additional payments and crowded parking lots. Millennials are the largest generational cohort and wield considerable buying power. This thesis used case studies and elite interviews to examine Millennials' buying habits and how automotive marketers can reach this audience. The project found that life events, such as moving into the suburbs or having a family, are what motivate Millennials to buy cars. When they do purchase vehicles, Millennials strive to balance the need for practicality with the desire to purchase aspirational brands. Automakers that support Millennials during their consumer research and position their cars as a supplement to the Millennial lifestyle tend to resonate with the generation.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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Corporate Wellness Communications: A Public Relations Strategy

Description

The following is a public relations strategy developed to position Julia Pearl Wellness, a corporate wellness consulting firm, and its owner, Julia Pearl, as credible, professional and experienced. The first portion includes a situational analysis, a research report on corporate

The following is a public relations strategy developed to position Julia Pearl Wellness, a corporate wellness consulting firm, and its owner, Julia Pearl, as credible, professional and experienced. The first portion includes a situational analysis, a research report on corporate wellness programs and the need for health solutions in the U.S., and market analysis. The campaign proposal, a creative product of the research, provides recommendations and tools for the firm to reach its stakeholders.

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Created

Date Created
2016-12

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A Comparison of Public Relations Ethics in Spain and the United States

Description

This paper aims to assess potential similarities and differences in the way that public relations professionals approach ethics in Spain and The United States. The approach taken for this study was first a thematic analysis of industry-accepted codes of ethics.

This paper aims to assess potential similarities and differences in the way that public relations professionals approach ethics in Spain and The United States. The approach taken for this study was first a thematic analysis of industry-accepted codes of ethics. These were the PRSA Code of Ethics from the United States and the ADECEC and Dircom codes of ethics from Spain. Although the codes provide a basis for a basic analysis, it is hard to say how public relations professionals implement ethical practices in their work solely based on codes of ethics. To further study the ethics in practice, interviews with public relations professionals from a 2012 trip to Madrid were transcribed and analyzed for key themes. To assess ethics in practice in the United States, public relations blog posts related to ethics were analyzed for key themes. The history of public relations in Spain is much shorter than in the United States The histories of the and cultural differences may be the cause of some of the differences in ethics.

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Date Created
2014-05

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Social Media and Public Relations: A Qualitative Analysis of Practitioners' Usage, Perceptions and Measurement

Description

A qualitative analysis that compares the social media usage, perceptions and measurement tools of public relations practitioners across a variety of industries.

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Date Created
2014-05

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A Comparative Study on the Use and Perception of Public Relations among Nonprofit Organizations

Description

This study investigates the use and perception of communications efforts among 197 animal-related and human services nonprofit organizations. Several facets of nonprofit communication such as traditional communication usage, social media adoption and usage, and the overall perception of the organizations'

This study investigates the use and perception of communications efforts among 197 animal-related and human services nonprofit organizations. Several facets of nonprofit communication such as traditional communication usage, social media adoption and usage, and the overall perception of the organizations' communications efforts were examined using a survey and Form 990 analysis. More in-depth analysis was conducted on the participating organizations' Facebook and Twitter accounts as well. After analyzing this data, the study found significant differences in how these two types of nonprofit organizations conduct their communications efforts. Animal-related organizations were much more active and saw higher levels of engagement on Facebook than human services organizations; however, there were no differences in how both types of organizations used Twitter. This study also found that human services organizations are more likely to have full-time or part-time staff members in charge of their communications, while animal-related organizations were more likely to assign this responsibility to a volunteer. These findings contribute valuable insight into how different types of nonprofit organizations are communicating with their stakeholders.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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Breathe, Don't Speak: Branding in the Digital Age

Description

Breathe, Don't Speak is an exploratory public relations campaign that applies strategic communication theories by thought leaders in social media and Millennial marketing to the promotion of an independent musical artist brand created by Allie Long. The project utilized methods

Breathe, Don't Speak is an exploratory public relations campaign that applies strategic communication theories by thought leaders in social media and Millennial marketing to the promotion of an independent musical artist brand created by Allie Long. The project utilized methods of digital communication, including a website, social media channels and music hosting to promote the Breathe, Don't Speak brand. The campaign was also supported by the offline communication strategies of strategic partnership and content co-creation.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05