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Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristics \u2014 Geographic Location

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Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristic \u2014 Geographic Location, is a review of the literature that analyzes and presents the central characteristics found within the four preexisting student college choice models. Over the past couple

Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristic \u2014 Geographic Location, is a review of the literature that analyzes and presents the central characteristics found within the four preexisting student college choice models. Over the past couple of decades, multiple different student college choice models have been created in order to define the process in which a student decides specifically on a college. The combined models that are analyzed within this study are: Chapman model (1981), Jackson model (1982), Hanson and Litten model (1989) and Hossler and Gallagher Model (1987). The focus on combined models in this literature review, ensures that all the models incorporate the rational assumptions seen in economic models and also analyze the components of status attainment models (Jackson, 1982). The four combined models will present various influences and factors that play a part within the student decision to overall attend college and then go on to define how a student chooses a specific college. Multiple different models analyzed within this study discuss how particular college characteristics play an ample role in the college student choice process. One of the biggest college characteristics seen within all four models, is the influence of college location on the decision making process. With location playing a vital role within the college choice decision, the factor of an institution's geographic location (in-state vs. out-of-state) will be analyzed in relation to these preexisting models.

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2018-05

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Arizona University Students’ Perceptions of COVID-19

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This study looked at student’s perceptions of COVID-19 and differences in how universities handled COVID-19. It aimed to assess what measures made students feel safe and were the most effective in lessening spread. A risk-perception survey scored feelings of safety/risk,

This study looked at student’s perceptions of COVID-19 and differences in how universities handled COVID-19. It aimed to assess what measures made students feel safe and were the most effective in lessening spread. A risk-perception survey scored feelings of safety/risk, and semi-structured interviews provided context. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis showed mixed opinions on university measures, and interviews identified wearing masks, social distancing, isolating, and limiting social contacts as measures that were effective in curbing spread.

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2021-05

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Socio-Cultural Evaluation of Student Access to Emerging Telehealth Systems at Arizona State University with Clinical Suggestions

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With the accelerated emergence of telehealth systems being deployed with promises to access unreachable populations in today’s socially distant environment, it is increasingly important to understand the barriers that underprivileged populations face when trying to access healthcare through digital platforms.

With the accelerated emergence of telehealth systems being deployed with promises to access unreachable populations in today’s socially distant environment, it is increasingly important to understand the barriers that underprivileged populations face when trying to access healthcare through digital platforms. This research investigates the use of telehealth in social and cultural sub-populations, focusing on how the diverse student population at Arizona State University (ASU) use the recently-launched ASU Telehealth system. Statistical analysis of demographic factors spanning the five categories of social determinants of health were coupled with population studies of the ASU student body to evaluate the reach of services and patient diversity across telehealth and in person health platforms. Results show that insurance, racial and international student identity influence the percentage of students within these demographic categories Also, though the ASU Telehealth patient body reflects ASU’s general student population, the platform did not increase the reach of Health Services and the magnitude of students served. using ASU Telehealth. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is difficult to determine the validity and reliability of these findings. However, the findings and background research point to targeted marketing campaigns, intentional policy decision-making, post-pandemic telehealth resilience, and the continuation of quantitative and qualitative data collection as means to expand the impact and equity of ASU Telehealth into future iterations of the platform. Outputs of this study include web communication materials and qualitative data collection mechanisms for future use and implementation by ASU Health Services.

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2021-05

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Effects of Social Technology Multitasking and Task-switching on Student Learning: A Literature Review

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With social technology on the rise, it is no surprise that young students are at the forefront of its use and impact, particularly in the realm of education. Due to greater accessibility to technology, media multitasking and task-switching are becoming

With social technology on the rise, it is no surprise that young students are at the forefront of its use and impact, particularly in the realm of education. Due to greater accessibility to technology, media multitasking and task-switching are becoming increasingly prominent in learning environments. While technology can have numerous benefits, current literature, though somewhat limited in this scope, overwhelmingly shows it can also be detrimental for academic performance and learning when used improperly. While much of the existing literature regarding the impact of technology on multitasking and task-switching in learning environments is limited to self-report data, it presents important findings and potential applications for modernizing educational institutions in the wake of technological dependence. This literature review summarizes and analyzes the studies in this area to date in an effort to provide a better understanding of the impact of social technology on student learning. Future areas of research and potential strategies to adapt to rising technological dependency are also discussed, such as using a brief "technology break" between periods of study. As of yet, the majority of findings in this research area suggest the following: multitasking while studying lengthens the time required for completion; multitasking during lectures can affect memory encoding and comprehension; excessive multitasking and academic performance are negatively correlated; metacognitive strategies for studying have potential for reducing the harmful effects of multitasking; and the most likely reason students engage in media-multitasking at the cost of learning is the immediate emotional gratification. Further research is still needed to fill in gaps in literature, as well as develop other potential perspectives relevant to multitasking in academic environments.

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2016-12