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Physical Activity Bursts: Impact of Exercise in Elementary School

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Research indicates that social changes have resulted in children exercising much less than in the past. This is problematic since physical activity throughout the elementary school day is imperative, because exercise improves academic focus, boosts mood, and leads to a

Research indicates that social changes have resulted in children exercising much less than in the past. This is problematic since physical activity throughout the elementary school day is imperative, because exercise improves academic focus, boosts mood, and leads to a healthier lifestyle. Exercising is pivotal for all students but even more so for students in the Special Education classroom who may rely on physical activity as a way of regulating their emotions. Depending on the school, students may only exercise at recess and during their Physical Education electives. Lack of physical activity can be detrimental to the academic and physical success of a student.
This thesis explores the impact of physical activity--what I have chosen to call “moments of movement” -- inside the classroom throughout the elementary school day. Journal-based observations were made by a student teacher placed in a special education 4th-6th grade writing and reading resource classroom from August-December of 2018 and a fourth grade general education classroom from January-May of 2019. All observations were made at Adams Elementary School, a Title 1 school, in the Mesa, Arizona school district. At this K-6 grade school, many students live with the challenges of poverty, neglect, unstable family dynamics, and trauma. Because the teachers work tirelessly to cultivate a sense of home for the students, there is a strong emphasis on non-traditional teaching methods, including the AVID program and the Kagan, and Tribes strategies.
Ms. Norris (the special education teacher) and Ms. Foss (the fourth grade teacher) both have strong backgrounds in fitness and naturally incorporate physical activity in their classrooms, which is not something typically found at elementary schools. In this paper, physical activity strategies in classrooms of Ms. Norris and Ms. Foss are analyzed, as well as the benefits of implementing these strategies. The impact of these “moments of movement” on the whole class and individual students is discussed, and suggestions are made to help educators incorporate “moments of movement” into their own classrooms. Educators can use the strategies present at Adams Elementary School as a model for incorporating exercise in their own classrooms.

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2019-05

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Accessibility Services Feedback and Recommendations: The Experience of a Sun Devil at ASU

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This paper argues that improved student disability services at universities can limit the amount of stress that burdens students with disabilities in order to, improve their mood and create greater possibilities for successful student outcomes. This study begins by reviewing

This paper argues that improved student disability services at universities can limit the amount of stress that burdens students with disabilities in order to, improve their mood and create greater possibilities for successful student outcomes. This study begins by reviewing the progress that has been made in the 20th and 21st centuries in terms of heightened awareness and legislation that benefit people with disabilities. In addition, it applauds the efforts made so far at the Arizona State University Polytechnic and Tempe campuses, but also seeks to highlight some concerns that might become a focus of future policymaking endeavors. The applause and concerns are based on the experience of the author with ASU’s Disability Resource Center (DRC), now rebranded as the Student Accessibility and Inclusive Learning Services (SAILS). The author’s lens of physical/mobility limitations yields insight into the accessibility of the unique programs
offered by ASU’s Study Abroad Office as well as the daily transportation efforts of the DRC/SAILS’s DART service. The particular experiences discussed include a Barrett Global Intensive Experience trip to Ireland, the use of the on-campus DART transportation service at Polytechnic and Tempe, handicap parking and elevator placement at Polytechnic, the intercampus shuttle, and the future of Zoom as a means of providing accessibility to students with disabilities. This paper will make recommendations to the appropriate parties for possible changes to policy and/or procedure and alterations to the current state of tangible obstacles.

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2020-12

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Effects of Social Technology Multitasking and Task-switching on Student Learning: A Literature Review

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With social technology on the rise, it is no surprise that young students are at the forefront of its use and impact, particularly in the realm of education. Due to greater accessibility to technology, media multitasking and task-switching are becoming

With social technology on the rise, it is no surprise that young students are at the forefront of its use and impact, particularly in the realm of education. Due to greater accessibility to technology, media multitasking and task-switching are becoming increasingly prominent in learning environments. While technology can have numerous benefits, current literature, though somewhat limited in this scope, overwhelmingly shows it can also be detrimental for academic performance and learning when used improperly. While much of the existing literature regarding the impact of technology on multitasking and task-switching in learning environments is limited to self-report data, it presents important findings and potential applications for modernizing educational institutions in the wake of technological dependence. This literature review summarizes and analyzes the studies in this area to date in an effort to provide a better understanding of the impact of social technology on student learning. Future areas of research and potential strategies to adapt to rising technological dependency are also discussed, such as using a brief "technology break" between periods of study. As of yet, the majority of findings in this research area suggest the following: multitasking while studying lengthens the time required for completion; multitasking during lectures can affect memory encoding and comprehension; excessive multitasking and academic performance are negatively correlated; metacognitive strategies for studying have potential for reducing the harmful effects of multitasking; and the most likely reason students engage in media-multitasking at the cost of learning is the immediate emotional gratification. Further research is still needed to fill in gaps in literature, as well as develop other potential perspectives relevant to multitasking in academic environments.

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2016-12