Matching Items (51)

135107-Thumbnail Image.png

Interactive Effects of Broad Social Motives and Descriptive Norms on Drinking Behavior

Description

Individuals with strong broad social motives (BSM) place high personal value on social activities and are at increased risk for heavy drinking. Those with strong BSM who also perceive that

Individuals with strong broad social motives (BSM) place high personal value on social activities and are at increased risk for heavy drinking. Those with strong BSM who also perceive that college students are heavy drinkers (high descriptive norms) might be particularly susceptible to increases in alcohol use during the transition to college, and may be likely to drink for social facilitation (social drinking motives). To test these hypotheses, we examined a mediated moderation model testing interactive effects of BSM and descriptive norms (perceptions of drinking in college) on drinking behavior, mediated by social drinking motives. Data were from 426 incoming college students and analyses were based on a subsample of 218 who reported drinking behavior at either time point. Results indicated that BSM interacted with descriptive norms to predict increases in social drinking motives from high school to college and social drinking motives in turn predicted increases in alcohol use. Probing this interaction revealed that those with high BSM and high descriptive norms experienced greater increases in social drinking motives than those with low descriptive norms. Tests of moderated indirect effects indicated that effects of BSM on drinking behavior through social drinking motives were also stronger among those with high descriptive norms. These results identify a particularly high risk group for changes in alcohol use during an important developmental period. This may have important implications for prevention and intervention methods which can attenuate college alcohol use by targeting individuals with strong BSM who perceive heavy drinking among college peers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

133929-Thumbnail Image.png

Analyzing the Brand Personalities and Social Media Practices of College Athletic Twitter Accounts

Description

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media practices on Twitter. The author conducted a content analysis of each school's tweets to measure brand personality and scraped data in order to collect social media practice information. Results suggest that brand personality and social media practices are distinct. Extraversion was the most common personality type among all schools. In addition, schools that tweeted less frequently than others exhibited more brand personality and used more visual media.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

134060-Thumbnail Image.png

Effects of Parental Monitoring, Parental Autonomy-Giving, and Personal Autonomy on Drinking Behaviors during the Transition from High School to College

Description

This study addresses a gap in the literature by examining interactions between parental monitoring and parental autonomy giving/personal autonomy in predicting changes in drinking behavior from high school to college.

This study addresses a gap in the literature by examining interactions between parental monitoring and parental autonomy giving/personal autonomy in predicting changes in drinking behavior from high school to college. Using data from two unique studies (study 1 was 62.8% female, n = 425; study 2 was 59.9% female, n = 2245), we analyzed main effects of parental monitoring, parental autonomy-giving, and personal autonomy. We also analyzed interactions between parental monitoring and autonomy-giving, and between parental monitoring and personal autonomy. Analyses found significant main effects of parental monitoring on drinking, with high levels of parental monitoring protecting against heavy drinking. Personal autonomy was a protective factor in both high school and college, whereas parental autonomy-giving did not predict drinking behavior in either high school or during the transition to college. This calls into question the extent to which parental autonomy-giving is a primary influence on personal autonomy. Hypothesized interactions between parental monitoring and parental autonomy giving/personal autonomy were not statistically significant. In summary, parental monitoring seems to be protective in high school, and personal autonomy—but not parental autonomy-giving—is also protective. Whereas the latter finding is well established from previous studies, the protective effect of personal autonomy during the transition to college is a novel finding. This relationship suggests that efforts to identify sources of personal autonomy in early adulthood and methods for increasing autonomy may be warranted.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

134020-Thumbnail Image.png

A Personal Journey Through Physical Fitness

Description

A Personal Journey Through Physical Fitness chronicles one individual's academic and physical journey through fitness. An ex college gymnast after exiting formal sports looks to academics for the answers to

A Personal Journey Through Physical Fitness chronicles one individual's academic and physical journey through fitness. An ex college gymnast after exiting formal sports looks to academics for the answers to accomplish the goal of working out one hour a day and feeling as well as being physically fit as a result. This research resulted in finding the five pillars of physical fitness; which are Endurance, Flexibility, Strength, Balance, and Agility. After determining that these were the five primary pillars of physical fitness a workout plan was made based on and focused on improving them. This work out plan included running and hiking for endurance, high intensity interval training for agility, endurance and strength, stretching at the end of every work out, and a weightlifting program that utilized push, pull, and lower body days. It also utilized yoga for flexibility, recovery, and balance. Additionally, gymnastic ring strength was included to help develop balance and strength. Then a four-week trial period was executed taking measurements at the beginning and end of the plan. The results of the five-pillar plan were quantified using physical metrics. There was improvement in all of the pillars: Endurance, Flexibility, Strength, Balance, and Agility. However it should be noted there was not a direct measure for balance making its improvement much more subjective and qualitative than quantitative. In addition to having physical metrics of health and increased fitness there were mental side effects such as of feeling good and more relaxed throughout the process. At the end of each week of the four-week workout trial mental and physical feelings were recorded and included in the study. The method and plan were successful and created in a way that others could follow this four-week plan to improve their own physical health.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

A Broke Bitch's Guide to Grub: An Exploration of College Eating Habits

Description

This project aims to explore factors influencing college students' eating behavior, and solutions to poor eating habits throughout college. I found that money, taste, and convenience are among the largest

This project aims to explore factors influencing college students' eating behavior, and solutions to poor eating habits throughout college. I found that money, taste, and convenience are among the largest contributors to decisions college students make regarding where and what to eat. I have created a cookbook, where each recipe costs under and up to $2 to create, that falls within the acceptable macronutrient distribution range (AMDR), and that will provide a reasonable number of calories for a young adult. My create project entails 21 original recipes that have been tested, perfected, and formed into the AMDR, to provide financially struggling students with a week's worth of substantial meals. I also included original illustrations to make the project visually appealing and add an additional layer of creativity to the work. There are 21 original recipes and 20 original illustrations found in the book, along with original research on the least expensive locations to buy food and the instruments necessary to prepare it. I have also included secondary research on the factors influencing college students' eating habits, and the recommended calorie intake and price point for young adults on a "thrifty" (low income) food plan. I have begun looking into publishing my work, both in print and as an e-book.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

How to Survive College

Description

Attending college brings on new experiences and challenges. In order to survive college, a student must figure out what resources are available to them and what will help them succeed.

Attending college brings on new experiences and challenges. In order to survive college, a student must figure out what resources are available to them and what will help them succeed. The purpose of this study is to learn about what students struggle with the most. Students were also asked about what advice they have for future students and what they would change about their own experience. Participants of the study consisted of ASU students 18 or older. Information was collected through interviews, an online survey, and a paper survey. Many students feel that high school has not prepared them for college. Some students continue to struggle with time management. With students coming from many different backgrounds, it is up to the college to provide resources to help students to succeed. However, it is up to the student to make the effort to find, ask, and use these resources. The student ultimately decides to use the resources and tools provided to them in order to survive college.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

131730-Thumbnail Image.png

A College Kid's Guide to a Balanced Diet

Description

As a college student, living in an apartment or home with a kitchen, making your own food decisions can be daunting. After spending so much time either living at home

As a college student, living in an apartment or home with a kitchen, making your own food decisions can be daunting. After spending so much time either living at home and having food cooked for you or living in a dorm where food is provided, it is difficult to suddenly have to put so much thought into something that for so long you didn’t have to think about at all. Not only that, it sometimes feels like the media is screaming from all sides that you need to eat a certain way to be ‘healthy’ or ‘fit’. I hope to be able to make this process a bit easier for you through this guide I have put together from my own experience and education.
‘Healthy’ foods always seem like the best choice, but what does it really mean to be healthy? A ‘healthy diet’ can mean any number of things depending on who you ask and where you look. Media provides an endless sea of tips, tricks, and diets for ‘eating healthy’. Oxford defines health as a state of physical, mental, and social well-being with the absence of disease and infirmity; and healthy as indicative of, conducive to, or promoting good health1. It is easy to get caught up in the excitement of fad diets, but maintaining a healthy eating pattern can be quite simple when put into practice.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

135321-Thumbnail Image.png

Stereotypical Analysis of Wind Instruments in College-Level Concert Band

Description

The purpose of this study is to analyze the stereotypes surrounding four wind instruments (flutes, oboes, clarinets, and saxophones), and the ways in which those stereotypes propagate through various levels

The purpose of this study is to analyze the stereotypes surrounding four wind instruments (flutes, oboes, clarinets, and saxophones), and the ways in which those stereotypes propagate through various levels of musical professionalism in Western culture. In order to determine what these stereotypes might entail, several thousand social media and blog posts were analyzed, and direct quotations detailing the perceived stereotypical personality profiles for each of the four instruments were collected. From these, the three most commonly mentioned characteristics were isolated for each of the instrument groups as follows: female gender, femininity, and giggliness for flutists, intelligence, studiousness, and demographics (specifically being an Asian male) for clarinetists, quirkiness, eccentricity, and being seen as a misfit for oboists, and overconfidence, attention-seeking behavior, and coolness for saxophonists. From these traits, a survey was drafted which asked participating college-aged musicians various multiple choice, opinion scale, and short-answer questions that gathered how much they agree or disagree with each trait describing the instrument from which it was derived. Their responses were then analyzed to determine how much correlation existed between the researched characteristics and the opinions of modern musicians. From these results, it was determined that 75% of the traits that were isolated for a particular instrument were, in fact, recognized as being true in the survey data, demonstrating that the stereotypes do exist and seem to be widely recognizable across many age groups, locations, and levels of musical skill. Further, 89% of participants admitted that the instrument they play has a certain stereotype associated with it, but only 38% of people identify with that profile. Overall, it was concluded that stereotypes, which are overwhelmingly negative and gendered by nature, are indeed propagated, but musicians do not appear to want to identify with them, and they reflect a more archaic and immature sense that does not correlate to the trends observed in modern, professional music.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

133659-Thumbnail Image.png

Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristics \u2014 Geographic Location

Description

Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristic \u2014 Geographic Location, is a review of the literature that analyzes and presents the central characteristics found within the

Factors that Contribute to a Student's College Choice Decision: College Characteristic \u2014 Geographic Location, is a review of the literature that analyzes and presents the central characteristics found within the four preexisting student college choice models. Over the past couple of decades, multiple different student college choice models have been created in order to define the process in which a student decides specifically on a college. The combined models that are analyzed within this study are: Chapman model (1981), Jackson model (1982), Hanson and Litten model (1989) and Hossler and Gallagher Model (1987). The focus on combined models in this literature review, ensures that all the models incorporate the rational assumptions seen in economic models and also analyze the components of status attainment models (Jackson, 1982). The four combined models will present various influences and factors that play a part within the student decision to overall attend college and then go on to define how a student chooses a specific college. Multiple different models analyzed within this study discuss how particular college characteristics play an ample role in the college student choice process. One of the biggest college characteristics seen within all four models, is the influence of college location on the decision making process. With location playing a vital role within the college choice decision, the factor of an institution's geographic location (in-state vs. out-of-state) will be analyzed in relation to these preexisting models.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133799-Thumbnail Image.png

Religion and College Romance: A Qualitative Approach to Interfaith Dating

Description

The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data.

The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data. Most of this information is related to interfaith marriages, but not much has been said about interfaith dating. The focus of this study is to examine people's accounts of their relationships in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships, specifically in students. What is being in an interfaith relationship like? A qualitative approach using four couples (N=8) in a two-year or four-year university program was used to gain more insight into the religious aspect of relationships. Conducting interviews of the couples together and separately allowed the individuals to comment on marriage, weddings, family, children, and more with regards to how religion has played a role. By interviewing the couples themselves, insight is gained on their personal relationships with each other. The interactions these couples have together, as well as their responses during interviewing, have both lead to findings regarding what being engaged in an interfaith relationship is like. Each couple is different and has their own, unique story to share. This thesis examines (1) an overview of the couples, (2) what does religion mean to the members of each couple, (3) what does a relationship mean to the members of each couple, (4) marriage, (5) religion as a couple, (6) limitations, and (7) recommendations for future research. This thesis aims to use personal experiences in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05