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What Works Best? A Global Comparative-Analysis of Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment and Care

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The purpose of this project is to present research within three main categories of treatment and care such as exercise, socialization and alternative therapies (art, pet, and reminiscent therapies) for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). These categories will be examined in the

The purpose of this project is to present research within three main categories of treatment and care such as exercise, socialization and alternative therapies (art, pet, and reminiscent therapies) for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). These categories will be examined in the following countries: United Kingdom, United States, Brazil, and China. Then, the synthesized material will be analyzed and placed into a comparison and contrast model showcasing what each country is currently using and the success of the particular resource within a heat map. According to the research found on the following categories of exercise, socialization and alternative therapies, I will conclude that a combination of aerobic and resistance training, routine support groups and art/pet therapies are the most effective treatment options against Alzheimer’s Disease.

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2019-05

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Contributing to a meta-analysis on the effects of acute physical exercise on the executive functions of preadolescent children, adolescents and adults

Description

The purpose of this study, originally, was to contribute to the completion of a meta-analysis conducted by Mara Wierstra from the University of Virginia. Wierstra had requested individual participant data from two separate studies conducted in our lab: "Acute bouts

The purpose of this study, originally, was to contribute to the completion of a meta-analysis conducted by Mara Wierstra from the University of Virginia. Wierstra had requested individual participant data from two separate studies conducted in our lab: "Acute bouts of assisted cycling improves cognitive and upper extremity movement functions in adolescents with Down syndrome" and "Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) improves inhibition in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder." From the data requested, the participants were required to complete three separate tests (i.e., Tower of London, Trail Making Task and the Stroop Test). After compiling the data and sending it to her, we decided to conduct a small meta-analysis of our own, drawing connecting conclusions from the data from the two studies. We concluded that observationally our data suggest an advantage for ACT over voluntary cycling and no cycling across two separate populations (i.e., Autism Spectrum Disorder and Down syndrome), and across different measures of executive function (i.e., Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, and Tower of London). The data suggest that the ACT interventions may promote the upregulation of neurotropic factors leading to neurogenesis in the prefrontal cortex of the brain.

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2016-12