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Heterogeneous Catalysis for Organic Reactions

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This honors thesis is focused on two separate catalysis projects conducted under the mentorship of Dr. Javier Pérez-Ramírez at ETH Zürich. The first project explored ethylene oxychlorination over supported europium oxychloride catalysts. The second project investigated alkyne semihydrogenation over nickel

This honors thesis is focused on two separate catalysis projects conducted under the mentorship of Dr. Javier Pérez-Ramírez at ETH Zürich. The first project explored ethylene oxychlorination over supported europium oxychloride catalysts. The second project investigated alkyne semihydrogenation over nickel phosphide catalysts. This work is the subject of a publication of which I am a co-author, as cited below.

Project 1 Abstract: Ethylene Oxychlorination
The current two-step process for the industrial process of vinyl chloride production involves CuCl2 catalyzed ethylene oxychlorination to ethylene dichloride followed by thermal cracking of the latter to vinyl chloride. To date, no industrial application of a one-step process is available. To close this gap, this work evaluates a wide range of self-prepared supported CeO2 and EuOCl catalysts for one-step production of vinyl chloride from ethylene in a fixed-bed reactor at 623 773 K and 1 bar using feed ratios of C2H4:HCl:O2:Ar:He = 3:3 6:1.5 6:3:82 89.5. Among all studied systems, CeO2/ZrO2 and CeO2/Zeolite MS show the highest activity but suffer from severe combustion of ethylene, forming COx, while 20 wt.% EuOCl/γ-Al2O3 leads to the best vinyl chloride selectivity of 87% at 15.6% C2H4 conversion with complete suppression of CO2 formation and only 4% selectivity to CO conversion for over 100 h on stream. Characterization by XRD and EDX mapping reveals that much of the Eu is present in non-active phases such as Al2Eu or EuAl4, indicating that alternative synthesis methods could be employed to better utilize the metal. A linear relationship between conversion and metal loading is found for this catalyst, indicating that always part of the used Eu is available as EuOCl, while the rest forms inactive europium aluminate species. Zeolite-supported EuOCl slightly outperforms EuOCl/γ Al2O3 in terms of total yield, but is prone to significant coking and is unstable. Even though a lot of Eu seems locked in inactive species on EuOCl/γ Al2O3, these results indicate possible savings of nearly 16,000 USD per kg of catalyst compared to a bulk EuOCl catalyst. These very promising findings constitute a crucial step for process intensification of polyvinyl chloride production and exploring the potential of supported EuOCl catalysts in industrially-relevant reactions.

Project 2 Abstract: Alkyne Semihydrogenation
Despite strongly suffering from poor noble metal utilization and a highly toxic selectivity modifier (Pb), the archetypal catalyst applied for the three-phase alkyne semihydrogenation, the Pb-doped Pd/CaCO3 (Lindlar catalyst), is still being utilized at industrial level. Inspired by the very recent strategies involving the modification of Pd with p-block elements (i.e., S), this work extrapolates the concept by preparing crystalline metal phosphides with controlled stoichiometry. To develop an affordable and environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional hydrogenation catalysts, nickel, a metal belonging to the same group as Pd and capable of splitting molecular hydrogen has been selected. Herein, a simple two-step synthesis procedure involving nontoxic precursors was used to synthesize bulk nickel phosphides with different stoichiometries (Ni2P, Ni5P4, and Ni12P5) by controlling the P:Ni ratios. To uncover structural and surface features, this catalyst family is characterized with an array of methods including X-ray diffraction (XRD), 31P magic-angle nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Bulk-sensitive techniques prove the successful preparation of pure phases while XPS analysis unravels the facile passivation occurring at the NixPy surface that persists even after reductive treatment. To assess the characteristic surface fingerprints of these materials, Ar sputtering was carried out at different penetration depths, reveling the presence of Ni+ and P-species. Continuous-flow three-phase hydrogenations of short-chain acetylenic compounds display that the oxidized layer covering the surface is reduced under reaction conditions, as evidenced by the induction period before reaching the steady state performance. To assess the impact of the phosphidation treatment on catalytic performance, the catalysts were benchmarked against a commercial Ni/SiO2-Al2O3 sample. While Ni/SiO2-Al2O3 presents very low selectivity to the alkene (the selectivity is about 10% at full conversion) attributed to the well-known tendency of naked nickel nanoparticles to form hydrides, the performance of nickel phosphides is highly selective and independent of P:Ni ratio. In line with previous findings on PdxS, kinetic tests indicate the occurrence of a dual-site mechanism where the alkyne and hydrogen do not compete for the same site.

This work is the subject of a publication of which I am a co-author, as cited below.

D. Albani; K. Karajovic; B. Tata; Q. Li; S. Mitchell; N. López; J. Pérez-Ramírez. Ensemble Design in Nickel Phosphide Catalysts for Alkyne Semi-Hydrogenation. ChemCatChem 2019. doi.org/10.1002/cctc.201801430

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2019-05

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New insights into the pore development mechanism of layered hydroxides upon thermal activation

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Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydrotalcite-like materials, are extensively used as precursors for the preparation of (photo-)catalysts, electrodes, magnetic materials, sorbents, etc. The synthesis typically involves the transformation to the corresponding mixed metal oxide via calcination, resulting in

Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydrotalcite-like materials, are extensively used as precursors for the preparation of (photo-)catalysts, electrodes, magnetic materials, sorbents, etc. The synthesis typically involves the transformation to the corresponding mixed metal oxide via calcination, resulting in atomically dispersed mixed metal oxides (MMOs). This process alters the porosity of the materials, with crucial implications for the performance in many applications. Yet, the mechanisms of pore formation and collapse are poorly understood. Combining an integrated in situ and ex situ characterization approach, here we follow the evolution of porosity changes during the thermal decomposition of LDHs integrating different divalent (Mg, Ni) and trivalent (Al, Ga) metals. Variations in porous properties determined by high-resolution argon sorption are linked to the morphological and compositional changes in the samples by in situ transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which is facilitated by the synthesis of well crystallized LDHs of large crystal size. The observations are correlated with the phase changes identified by X-ray diffraction, the mass losses evidenced by thermogravimetric analysis, the structural changes determined by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the pore connectivity analyzed by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The findings show that the multimetallic nature of the LDH governs the size and distribution (geometry, location, and connectivity) of the mesopores developed, which is controlled by the crystallization of the MMO phase, providing key insights for the improved design of porous mixed metal oxides.

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2017-05

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Oxygen Ionic-Conducting Ceramics for Gas Separation and Reaction Applications

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Mixed-ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) oxides have drawn much attention from researchers because of their potential in high temperature separation processes. Among many materials available, perovskite type and fluorite type oxides are the most studied for their excellent oxygen ion transport

Mixed-ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) oxides have drawn much attention from researchers because of their potential in high temperature separation processes. Among many materials available, perovskite type and fluorite type oxides are the most studied for their excellent oxygen ion transport property. These oxides not only can be oxygen adsorbent or O2-permeable membranes themselves, but also can be incorporated with molten carbonate to form dual-phase membranes for CO2 separation.

Oxygen sorption/desorption properties of perovskite oxides with and without oxygen vacancy were investigated first by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed experiments. The oxide with unique disorder-order phase transition during desorption exhibited an enhanced oxygen desorption rate during the TGA measurement but not in fixed-bed demonstrations. The difference in oxygen desorption rate is due to much higher oxygen partial pressure surrounding the sorbent during the fixed-bed oxygen desorption process, as revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of rapidly quenched samples.

Research on using perovskite oxides as CO2-permeable dual-phase membranes was subsequently conducted. Two CO2-resistant MIEC perovskite ceramics, Pr0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8 O3-δ (PSCF) and SrFe0.9Ta0.1O3-δ (SFT) were chosen as support materials for membrane synthesis. PSCF-molten carbonate (MC) and SFT-MC membranes were prepared for CO2-O2 counter-permeation. The geometric factors for the carbonate phase and ceramic phase were used to calculate the effective carbonate and oxygen ionic conductivity in the carbonate and ceramic phase. When tested in CO2-O2 counter-permeation set-up, CO2 flux showed negligible change, but O2 flux decreased by 10-32% compared with single-component permeation. With CO2 counter-permeation, the total oxygen permeation flux is higher than that without counter-permeation.

A new concept of CO2-permselective membrane reactor for hydrogen production via steam reforming of methane (SRM) was demonstrated. The results of SRM in the membrane reactor confirm that in-situ CO2 removal effectively promotes water-gas shift conversion and thus enhances hydrogen yield. A modeling study was also conducted to assess the performance of the membrane reactor in high-pressure feed/vacuum sweep conditions, which were not carried out due to limitations in current membrane testing set-up. When 5 atm feed pressure and 10-3 atm sweep pressure were applied, the membrane reactor can produce over 99% hydrogen stream in simulation.

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2020

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Modeling the Flowability of Granular Materials

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This thesis investigated the effects of differing diameters and varying moisture content on the flowability properties of granular glass beads through use of a Freeman FT4 Powder Rheometer. These parameters were tested in order to construct an empirical model to

This thesis investigated the effects of differing diameters and varying moisture content on the flowability properties of granular glass beads through use of a Freeman FT4 Powder Rheometer. These parameters were tested in order to construct an empirical model to predict flowability properties of glass beads at differing size ranges and moisture contents. The final empirical model outputted an average error of 8.73% across all tested diameters and moisture ranges.

Mohr's circles were constructed from experimentally-obtained shear stress values to quantitatively describe flowability of tested materials in terms of a flow function parameter. A high flow function value (>10) was indicative of a good flow.

By testing 120-180 µm, 120-350 µm, 180-250 µm, 250-350 µm, 430-600 µm, and 600-850 µm glass bead diameter ranges, an increase in size was seen to result in higher flow function values. The limitations of testing using the FT4 became apparent as inconsistent flow function values were obtained at 0% moisture with size ranges above 120-180 µm, or at flow function values of >21. Bead sizes larger than 430 µm showed significant standard deviation over all tested trials--when excluding size ranges above that value, the empirical model showed an average error of only 6.45%.

Wet material testing occurred at all tested glass bead size ranges using a deionized water content of 0%, 1%, 5%, 15%, and 20% by weight. The results of such testing showed a decrease in the resulting flow function parameter as more water content was added. However, this trend changed as 20% moisture content was achieved; the wet material became supersaturated, and an increase in flow function values was observed. The empirical model constructed, therefore, neglected the 20% moisture content regime.

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2019

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Synthesis, Characterization and Oxygen Adsorption Properties of Substituted Aluminophosphate (AlPO4-5, AFI) Zeolites

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The objective of this research was to develop Aluminophosphate-five (AlPO4-5, AFI) zeolite adsorbents for efficient oxygen removal from a process stream to support an on-going Department of Energy (DOE) project on solar energy storage. A molecular simulation study predicted that

The objective of this research was to develop Aluminophosphate-five (AlPO4-5, AFI) zeolite adsorbents for efficient oxygen removal from a process stream to support an on-going Department of Energy (DOE) project on solar energy storage. A molecular simulation study predicted that substituted AlPO4-5 zeolite can adsorb O2 through a weak chemical bond at ambient temperature. Substituted AlPO4-5 zeolite was successfully synthesized via hydrothermal crystallization by following carefully designed procedures to tailor the zeolite for efficient O2 adsorption. Synthesized AlPO4-5 in this work included Sn/AlPO-5, Mo/AlPO-5, Pd/AlPO-5, Si/AlPO-5, Mn/AlPO-5, Ce/AlPO-5, Fe/AlPO-5, CuCe/AlPO-5, and MnSnSi/AlPO-5. While not all zeolite samples synthesized were fully characterized, selected zeolite samples were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystal structure confirmation and phase identification, and nitrogen adsorption for their pore textural properties. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area and pore size distribution were between 172 m2 /g - 306 m2 /g and 6Å - 9Å, respectively, for most of the zeolites synthesized. Samples of great interest to this project such as Sn/AlPO-5, Mo/AlPO-5 and MnSnSi/AlPO-5 were also characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology and particle size estimation, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for nature of adsorbed oxygen. Oxygen and nitrogen adsorption experiments were carried out in a 3-Flex adsorption apparatus (Micrometrics) at various temperatures (primarily at 25℃) to determine the adsorption properties of these zeolite samples as potential adsorbents for oxygen/nitrogen separation. Experiments showed that some of the zeolite samples adsorb little-to-no oxygen and nitrogen at 25℃, while other zeolites such as Sn/AlPO-5, Mo/AlPO-5, and MnSnSi/AlPO-5 adsorb decent but inconsistent amounts of oxygen with the highest observed values of about 0.47 mmol/ g, 0.56 mmol/g, and 0.84 mmol/ g respectively. The inconsistency in adsorption is currently attributed to non-uniform doping of the zeolites, and these findings validate that some substituted AlPO4-5 zeolites are promising adsorbents. However, more investigations are needed to verify the causes of this inconsistency to develop a successful AlPO4-5 zeolite-based adsorbent for oxygen/nitrogen separation.

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2021

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Electrode-Coated Inorganic Separators for High Performance and Safe Lithium-Ion and Lithium-Metal Batteries

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Lithium-ion and lithium-metal batteries are deemed to be the choice of energy storage media for the future. However, they are not entirely safe and their performance in terms of cycle life and charging rates is sub-optimal. A majority of these

Lithium-ion and lithium-metal batteries are deemed to be the choice of energy storage media for the future. However, they are not entirely safe and their performance in terms of cycle life and charging rates is sub-optimal. A majority of these issues arise from the currently used flammable polyolefinic separators and carbonate solvent based electrolytes. This work utilizes in-house developed and specific property tuned electrode-coated inorganic separators in combination with a fire-proof electrolyte to resolve the above stated concerns.Firstly, to improve the safety of the lithium-ion cell with a commercial polypropylene separator a thermally stable in-house developed electrode coated quartz silica separator is utilized. The silica separator due to its better electrolyte wettability, electrolyte uptake and lower resistance also offers better capacity retention (~ 15 %) at high rates of discharge. Subsequently, research on developing a completely safe lithium-ion battery was conducted by replacing the traditional carbonate solvent based electrolyte with a fire-proof lithium bis-fluoro sulphonyl-imide salt/tri-methyl phosphate solvent electrolyte. However, this electrolyte has a high viscosity and low separator wetting rate.
A microporous in house synthesized silicalite electrode-coated separator due to its high surface energy functionalizes the viscous fire-proof electrolyte and together they are tested in a full-cell. The intra-particle pores of the silicalite separator result in a thinner and more robust solid electrolyte interface on graphite. This results in about 20 % higher capacity retention during long term cycling when compared to the polypropylene separator used in the same full-cell.
To enable stable and fast charging lithium-metal batteries free from dendrite propagation related failure, plate shaped γ-alumina and silicalite electrode-coated separators with high tortuosity are developed and used in a lithium-metal full-cell battery, with the former separator having no intra-particle pores and the latter having them. The γ-alumina separators show improvements in dendrite propagation prevention up to 3 C-rate of charge/discharge but a loss in active lithium is seen beyond the 75th cycle. However, microporous plate-shaped silicalite separators did not show any loss in active lithium even at 3 C-rate for 100 cycles due to the homogenized lithium-ion flux at the anode, while also preventing dendrite propagation.

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2021

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Optimum co-product utilization from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae

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The project aims at utilization of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) byproducts like biochar to grow microalgae. HTL is a promising method to convert wet algal biomasses into biofuels. The initial microalgae liquefaction at a temperature of 300 °C for 30 minute,

The project aims at utilization of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) byproducts like biochar to grow microalgae. HTL is a promising method to convert wet algal biomasses into biofuels. The initial microalgae liquefaction at a temperature of 300 °C for 30 minute, converted 31.22 % of the Galdieria sulphuraria and 41.00 % of the Kirchneriella cornutum into biocrude. Upon changing the reactor from a 100 ml to a 250 ml reactor, the yield in biocrude increased to 31.48 % for G. sulphuraria and dropped to 38.05 % for K. cornutum. Further, energy recoveries based on calorific values of HTL products were seen to drop by about 5 % of the 100 ml calculated values in the larger reactor.

Biochar from HTL of G. sulphuraria at 300 °C showed 15.98 and 5.27 % of phosphorous and nitrogen, respectively. HTL products from the biomass were analyzed for major elements through ICP-OES and CHNS/O. N and P are macronutrients that can be utilized in growing microalgae. This could reduce the operational demands in growing algae like, phosphorous mined to meet annual national demand for aviation fuel. Acidic leaching of these elements as phosphates and ammoniacal nitrogen was studied. Improved leaching of 49.49 % phosphorous and 95.71 % nitrogen was observed at 40 °C and pH 2.5 over a period of 7 days into the growth media. These conditions being ideal for growth of G. sulphuraria, leaching can be done in-situ to reduce overhead cost.

Growth potential of G. sulphuraria in leached media was compared to a standard cyanidium media produced from inorganic chemicals. Initial inhibition studies were done in the leached media at 40 °C and 2-3 vol. % CO2 to observe a positive growth rate of 0.273 g L-1 day-1. Further, growth was compared to standard media with similar composition in a 96 well plate 50 μL microplate assay for 5 days. The growth rates in both media were comparable. Additionally, growth was confirmed in a 240 times larger tubular reactor in a Tissue Culture Roller drum apparatus. A better growth was observed in the leached cyanidium media as compared to the standard variant.

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2017

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System Identification, State Estimation, And Control Approaches to Gestational Weight Gain Interventions

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Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is a significant public health concern and has been the recent focus of novel, control systems-based interventions. Healthy Mom Zone (HMZ) is an intervention study that aims to develop and validate an individually tailored and

Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is a significant public health concern and has been the recent focus of novel, control systems-based interventions. Healthy Mom Zone (HMZ) is an intervention study that aims to develop and validate an individually tailored and intensively adaptive intervention to manage weight gain for overweight or obese pregnant women using control engineering approaches. Motivated by the needs of the HMZ, this dissertation presents how to use system identification and state estimation techniques to assist in dynamical systems modeling and further enhance the performance of the closed-loop control system for interventions.

Underreporting of energy intake (EI) has been found to be an important consideration that interferes with accurate weight control assessment and the effective use of energy balance (EB) models in an intervention setting. To better understand underreporting, a variety of estimation approaches are developed; these include back-calculating energy intake from a closed-form of the EB model, a Kalman-filter based algorithm for recursive estimation from randomly intermittent measurements in real time, and two semi-physical identification approaches that can parameterize the extent of systematic underreporting with global/local modeling techniques. Each approach is analyzed with intervention participant data and demonstrates potential of promoting the success of weight control.

In addition, substantial efforts have been devoted to develop participant-validated models and incorporate into the Hybrid Model Predictive Control (HMPC) framework for closed-loop interventions. System identification analyses from Phase I led to modifications of the measurement protocols for Phase II, from which longer and more informative data sets were collected. Participant-validated models obtained from Phase II data significantly increase predictive ability for individual behaviors and provide reliable open-loop dynamic information for HMPC implementation. The HMPC algorithm that assigns optimized dosages in response to participant real time intervention outcomes relies on a Mixed Logical Dynamical framework which can address the categorical nature of dosage components, and translates sequential decision rules and other clinical considerations into mixed-integer linear constraints. The performance of the HMPC decision algorithm was tested with participant-validated models, with the results indicating that HMPC is superior to "IF-THEN" decision rules.

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2018

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Zwitterionic poly (arylene ether sulfone) copolymers: membrane applications and fundamentals

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Zwitterionic polymers, due to their supurior capability of electrostatically induced hydration, have been considered as effective functionalities to alleviate bio-fouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Bulk modification of polysulfone-based matrices to improve hydrophilicity, on the other hand, is favored due

Zwitterionic polymers, due to their supurior capability of electrostatically induced hydration, have been considered as effective functionalities to alleviate bio-fouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Bulk modification of polysulfone-based matrices to improve hydrophilicity, on the other hand, is favored due to the high membrane performance, processibility, and intrinsic chlorine resistance. Here a novel synthetic method was demonstrated to prepare zwitterionic poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) copolymers, which was blended with native polysulfone (PSf) to fabricate free-standing asymmetric membranes via non-solvent induced phase separation process. Both the porosity of the support layer and surface hydrophilicity increased drastically due to the incorporation of zwitterion functionalities in the rigid polysulfone matrix. The water permeance and antifouling ability of the blend membranes were both remarkably improved to 2.5 Lm−2 h−1 bar−1 and 94% of flux recovery ratio, respectively, while salt rejection remained at a high level (98%) even under the high exposure to chlorine (8,000 ppm•h). Besides the preliminary blended membrane design, for the future membrane property enhancement, this dissertation also focused on polymer structure optimizations via elucidating the fundamentals from two perspectives: 1). Synthetic reaction kinetics and mechanisms on polycondensation of PAES. Interestingly, in combination of experiments and the computational calculations by density functional theory (DFT) methods in this work, only the aryl chlorides (ArCl) monomer follows the classical second-order reaction kinetics of aromatic nucleophilic substitution (SNAr) mechanism, while the kinetics of the aryl fluorides (ArF) reaction fit a third-order rate law. The third order reaction behavior of the ArF monomer is attributed to the activation of the carbon-fluorine bond by two potassium cations (at least one bounded to phenolate), which associate as a strong three-body complex. This complex acts as the predominant reactant during the attack by the nucleophile. 2). Optimized copolymer structures were developed for controlled high molecular weight (Mw ~ 65 kDa) and zwitterionic charge content (0~100 mol%), via off-set stoichiometry during polycondensations, following with thiol-ene click reaction and ring-opening of sultone to introduce the sulfobetaine functional groups. The structure-property-morphology relationships were elucidated for better understanding atomic-level features in the charged polymers for future high-performance desalination applications.

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2019

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Production of Renewable Fuels from Bio-Based Feedstocks: A Viable Path to Enhance Value Chain and Sustainability

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The continued reliance on fossil fuel for energy resources has proven to be unsustainable, leading to depletion of world reserves and emission of greenhouse gases during their combustion. Therefore, research initiatives to develop potentially carbon-neutral biofuels were given the highest

The continued reliance on fossil fuel for energy resources has proven to be unsustainable, leading to depletion of world reserves and emission of greenhouse gases during their combustion. Therefore, research initiatives to develop potentially carbon-neutral biofuels were given the highest importance. Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL, a thermochemical conversion process) of microalgae is recognized as a favorable and efficient technique to produce liquid biofuels from wet feedstocks. In this work, three different microalgae (Kirchneriella sp., Galdieria sulphuraria, Micractinium sp.) grown and harvested at Arizona State University were hydrothermally liquefied to optimize their process conditions under different temperatures (200-375 °C), residence times (15-60 min), solids loadings (10-20 wt.%), and process pressures (9-24 MPa). A one-factor-at-a-time approach was employed, and comprehensive experiments were conducted at 10 % solid loadings and a residence time of 30 min. Co-liquefaction of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. (SL), Swine manure (SM) with Cyanidioschyzon merolae (CM) was tested for the presence of synergy. A positive synergistic effect was observed during the co-liquefaction of biomasses, where the experimental yield (32.95 wt.%) of biocrude oil was higher than the expected value (29.23 wt.% ). Co-liquefaction also led to an increase in the energy content of the co-liquefied biocrude oil and a higher energy recovery rate ( 88.55 %). The HTL biocrude was measured for energy content, elemental, and chemical composition using GC-MS. HTL aqueous phase was analyzed for potential co-products by spectrophotometric techniques and is rich in soluble carbohydrates, dissolved ammoniacal nitrogen, and phosphates. HTL biochar was studied for its nutrient content (nitrogen and phosphorous) and viability of its recovery to cultivate algae without any inhibition using the nutrient leaching. HTL biochar was also studied to produce hydrogen via pyrolysis using a membrane reactor at 500 °C, 1 atm, for 24 h to produce 5.93 wt.% gas. The gaseous product contains 45.7 mol % H2, 44.05 ml % CH4, and 10.25 mol % of CO. The versatile applications of HTL biochar were proposed from a detailed physicochemical characterization. The metal impurities in the algae, bio-oil, and biochar were quantified by ICP-OES where algae and biochar contain a large proportion of phosphorous and magnesium.

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2020