Matching Items (14)

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Investigating the Skin Immune Proteome of the White-Nose Syndrome Resistant Gray Bat, Myotis grisescens

Description

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal infection caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) which was first observed in the United States in 2006. Pd infects bats during hibernation and leads

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal infection caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) which was first observed in the United States in 2006. Pd infects bats during hibernation and leads to the development of cutaneous lesions and behavioral changes that can result in the animal's death. This study generated the first complete bat skin proteome for the WNS resistant gray bat (Myotis grisescens) to optimize sample preparation methods and identify immune proteins that may signal resistance. Wing tissue was collected from a female gray bat and processed in a Barocycler using 4M or 8M urea followed by an in-gel trypsin digestion of pooled samples and processing of separate samples without digestion specifically to capture and identify small antimicrobial peptides. Both undigested and digested samples were analyzed using a Thermo Fisher LTQ Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer and interpreted using PEAKS software. A total of 29 immune proteins were identified including the antimicrobial peptide dermcidin. This method will be applied to a larger range of samples from five species variably impacted by WNS to compare skin proteomes with the aim of identifying immune proteins that are responsible for resistance at the barrier where Pd invades.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Improving the Valley Fever Gene Annotation Through Proteogenomic Analysis

Description

Valley Fever, also known as coccidioidomycosis, is a respiratory disease that affects 10,000 people annually, primarily in Arizona and California. Due to a lack of gene annotation, diagnosis and treatment

Valley Fever, also known as coccidioidomycosis, is a respiratory disease that affects 10,000 people annually, primarily in Arizona and California. Due to a lack of gene annotation, diagnosis and treatment of Valley Fever is severely limited. In turn, gene annotation efforts are also hampered by incomplete genome sequencing. We intend to use proteogenomic analysis to reannotate the Coccidioides posadasii str. Silveira genome from protein-level data. Protein samples extracted from both phases of Silveira were fragmented into peptides, sequenced, and compared against databases of known and predicted proteins sequences, as well as a de novo six-frame translation of the genome. 288 unique peptides were located that did not match a known Silveira annotation, and of those 169 were associated with another Coccidioides strain. Additionally, 17 peptides were found at the boundary of, or outside of, the current gene annotation comprising four distinct clusters. For one of these clusters, we were able to calculate a lower bound and an estimate for the size of the gap between two Silveira contigs using the Coccidioides immitis RS transcript associated with that cluster's peptides \u2014 these predictions were consistent with the current annotation's scaffold structure. Three peptides were associated with an actively translated transposon, and a putative active site was located within an intact LTR retrotransposon. We note that gene annotation is necessarily hindered by the quality and level of detail in prior genome sequencing efforts, and recommend that future studies involving reannotation include additional sequencing as well as gene annotation via proteogenomics or other methods.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Understanding Differences Between Susceptibility and Resistance to White-Nose Syndrome in Bats: Methodological Optimization

Description

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease that infects hibernating bats of multiple species across large portions of eastern North America. To date, WNS has been responsible for the deaths

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease that infects hibernating bats of multiple species across large portions of eastern North America. To date, WNS has been responsible for the deaths of over seven million bats. It is not yet known why certain species are able to resist infection. Since the fungus invades the skin and some resistant species show no signs of the characteristic cutaneous lesions, it seems likely that resistant species contain specific defense mechanisms within their skin, such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and other immunologically relevant proteins expressed by specific cell types or as secreted soluble components. Proteomics could be a useful tool for understanding differences in susceptibility, and could help identify AMPs that could be synthesized and used as control agents against the spread of the causative fungus. This study is the first to optimize proteomics methods for bat wing tissues in order to compare the skin proteomes of species variably impacted by WNS, including those of two endangered species. Further tests are planned to investigate methods of increasing protein yield without altering the size of the tissue sample collected, as well as the analysis of mass spectrometry data from processed skin tissues of five bat species differentially affected by WNS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Improving Peptide Identification in Shotgun Proteomics Using Deep Neural Networks

Description

In shotgun proteomics, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry
(LC-MS/MS) is used to identify and quantify peptides and proteins. LC-MS/MS produces mass spectra, which must be searched by one

In shotgun proteomics, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry
(LC-MS/MS) is used to identify and quantify peptides and proteins. LC-MS/MS produces mass spectra, which must be searched by one or more engines, which employ
algorithms to match spectra to theoretical spectra derived from a reference database.
These engines identify and characterize proteins and their component peptides. By
training a convolutional neural network on a dataset of over 6 million MS/MS spectra
derived from human proteins, we aim to create a tool that can quickly and effectively
identify spectra as peptides prior to database searching. This can significantly reduce search space and thus run time for database searches, thereby accelerating LCMS/MS-based proteomics data acquisition. Additionally, by training neural networks
on labels derived from the search results of three different database search engines, we
aim to examine and compare which features are best identified by individual search
engines, a neural network, or a combination of these.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Proteomic Profile of Chronic Stress and Recovery in the Hippocampus

Description

The stress response facilitates our ability to deal effectively with threatening situations, but exposure to severe or chronic stressors can lead to undesirable neural, physiological, and behavioral outcomes. Chronic stress

The stress response facilitates our ability to deal effectively with threatening situations, but exposure to severe or chronic stressors can lead to undesirable neural, physiological, and behavioral outcomes. Chronic stress is associated with structural changes in the rat hippocampus, with corresponding deficits in learning and memory. Recent studies have uncovered an inherent neuroplasticity that allows the hippocampus to recover from these stress-induced neural changes. Underlying mechanisms likely involve several different cellular and molecular pathways. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of these pathways, we investigated differences in protein expression throughout the timeline of chronic stress and recovery. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to chronic restraint stress for 6hr/d/10d or 6hr/d/21d, stress for 6hr/d/21d followed by a recovery period of no stress for 10 or 21 days, or a control group. The proteome from the hippocampus of these rats was sequenced using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and analyzed. We hypothesized that chronic stress alters interneuronal signaling in the hippocampus by enhancing or attenuating the expression of proteins responsible for synaptic plasticity (functional) and neuronal structure (morphology). So far we have found that structural proteins, such as alpha-internexin, homer protein homolog 3, neurofilament light, and vimentin were significantly altered by chronic stress and recovery. In contrast, proteins necessary for or associated with myelination such as 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein, myelin basic protein S, and myelin proteolipid protein were significantly downregulated by chronic stress. Collectively, these results will provide a resource for further investigations into the mechanisms of the brain's recovery from chronic stress.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Proteomics: The New Beginning to Discovering a Drug Treatment for Schizophrenia

Description

Though schizophrenia was categorized as a mental illness over 100 years ago, there is a plethora of knowledge that continues to perplex the scientific and medical community alike. This tragic

Though schizophrenia was categorized as a mental illness over 100 years ago, there is a plethora of knowledge that continues to perplex the scientific and medical community alike. This tragic mental disorder affects approximately 1% of the general population, and many of these individuals are homeless if left untreated. Each schizophrenia patient has a different set of symptoms, so all of these patients experience a variety of positive and negative symptoms. Negative symptoms are called so as they are in absence, and some examples include apathy, anhedonia, lack of motivation, reduced social drive, and reduced cognitive functioning. Positive behavior, on the other hand, is a change in behavior or thoughts such as visual or auditory hallucinations, delusions, confused thoughts, disorganized speech, and trouble concentrating. Because schizophrenia patients do not share the exact same set of symptoms, research in schizophrenia requires a tremendous amount of medical resources. Over the last few years, new studies have started in the field of schizophrenia involving proteomics, or the study of proteins and their function. This new frontier gives doctors and scientists alike a new opportunity to improve the quality of life of schizophrenia patients by providing a potential method through which patients would receive individualized treatment based on their specific symptoms.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Targeted proteomics studies: design, development and translation of mass spectrometric immunoassays for diabetes and kidney disease

Description

In an effort to begin validating the large number of discovered candidate biomarkers, proteomics is beginning to shift from shotgun proteomic experiments towards targeted proteomic approaches that provide solutions to

In an effort to begin validating the large number of discovered candidate biomarkers, proteomics is beginning to shift from shotgun proteomic experiments towards targeted proteomic approaches that provide solutions to automation and economic concerns. Such approaches to validate biomarkers necessitate the mass spectrometric analysis of hundreds to thousands of human samples. As this takes place, a serendipitous opportunity has become evident. By the virtue that as one narrows the focus towards "single" protein targets (instead of entire proteomes) using pan-antibody-based enrichment techniques, a discovery science has emerged, so to speak. This is due to the largely unknown context in which "single" proteins exist in blood (i.e. polymorphisms, transcript variants, and posttranslational modifications) and hence, targeted proteomics has applications for established biomarkers. Furthermore, besides protein heterogeneity accounting for interferences with conventional immunometric platforms, it is becoming evident that this formerly hidden dimension of structural information also contains rich-pathobiological information. Consequently, targeted proteomics studies that aim to ascertain a protein's genuine presentation within disease- stratified populations and serve as a stepping-stone within a biomarker translational pipeline are of clinical interest. Roughly 128 million Americans are pre-diabetic, diabetic, and/or have kidney disease and public and private spending for treating these diseases is in the hundreds of billions of dollars. In an effort to create new solutions for the early detection and management of these conditions, described herein is the design, development, and translation of mass spectrometric immunoassays targeted towards diabetes and kidney disease. Population proteomics experiments were performed for the following clinically relevant proteins: insulin, C-peptide, RANTES, and parathyroid hormone. At least thirty-eight protein isoforms were detected. Besides the numerous disease correlations confronted within the disease-stratified cohorts, certain isoforms also appeared to be causally related to the underlying pathophysiology and/or have therapeutic implications. Technical advancements include multiplexed isoform quantification as well a "dual- extraction" methodology for eliminating non-specific proteins while simultaneously validating isoforms. Industrial efforts towards widespread clinical adoption are also described. Consequently, this work lays a foundation for the translation of mass spectrometric immunoassays into the clinical arena and simultaneously presents the most recent advancements concerning the mass spectrometric immunoassay approach.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Highly Multiplexed Single Cell in situ Protein Analysis with Cleavable Fluorescent Probes

Description

Measurements of different molecular species from single cells have the potential to reveal cell-to-cell variations, which are precluded by population-based measurements. An increasing percentage of researches have been focused on

Measurements of different molecular species from single cells have the potential to reveal cell-to-cell variations, which are precluded by population-based measurements. An increasing percentage of researches have been focused on proteins, for its central roles in biological processes. Immunofluorescence (IF) has been a well-established protein analysis platform. To gain comprehensive insights into cell biology and diagnostic pathology, a crucial direction would be to increase the multiplexity of current single cell protein analysis technologies.

An azide-based chemical cleavable linker has been introduced to design and synthesis novel fluorescent probes. These probes allow cyclic immunofluorescence staining which leads to the feasibility of highly multiplexed single cell in situ protein profiling. These highly multiplexed imaging-based platforms have the potential to quantify more than 100 protein targets in cultured cells and more than 50 protein targets in single cells in tissues.

This approach has been successfully applied in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) brain tissues. Multiplexed protein expression level results reveal neuronal heterogeneity in the human hippocampus.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Gene annotation using the proteome

Description

While the entire human genome has been sequenced, the understanding of its functional elements remains unclear. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project analyzed 1% of the human genome and

While the entire human genome has been sequenced, the understanding of its functional elements remains unclear. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project analyzed 1% of the human genome and found that the majority of the human genome is transcribed, including non-protein coding regions. The hypothesis is that some of the "non-coding" sequences are translated into peptides and small proteins. Using mass spectrometry numerous peptides derived from the ENCODE transcriptome were identified. Peptides and small proteins were also found from non-coding regions of the 1% of the human genome that the ENCODE did not find transcripts for. A large portion of these peptides mapped to the intronic regions of known genes, thus it is suspected that they may be undiscovered exons present in alternative spliceoforms of certain genes. Further studies proved the existence of polyadenylated RNAs coding for these peptides. Although their functional significance has not been determined, I anticipate the findings will lead to the discovery of new splice variants of known genes and possibly new transcriptional and translational mechanisms.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Immunosignature of Alzheimer's disease

Description

The goal of this thesis is to test whether Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with distinctive humoral immune changes that can be detected in plasma and tracked across time. This

The goal of this thesis is to test whether Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with distinctive humoral immune changes that can be detected in plasma and tracked across time. This is relevant because AD is the principal cause of dementia, and yet, no specific diagnostic tests are universally employed in clinical practice to predict, diagnose or monitor disease progression. In particular, I describe herein a proteomic platform developed at the Center for Innovations in Medicine (CIM) consisting of a slide with 10.000 random-sequence peptides printed on its surface, which is used as the solid phase of an immunoassay where antibodies of interest are allowed to react and subsequently detected with a labeled secondary antibody. The pattern of antibody binding to the microarray is unique for each individual animal or person. This thesis will evaluate the versatility of the microarray platform and how it can be used to detect and characterize the binding patterns of antibodies relevant to the pathophysiology of AD as well as the plasma samples of animal models of AD and elderly humans with or without dementia. My specific aims were to evaluate the emergence and stability of immunosignature in mice with cerebral amyloidosis, and characterize the immunosignature of humans with AD. Plasma samples from APPswe/PSEN1-dE9 transgenic mice were evaluated longitudinally from 2 to 15 months of age to compare the evolving immunosignature with non-transgenic control mice. Immunological variation across different time-points was assessed, with particular emphasis on time of emergence of a characteristic pattern. In addition, plasma samples from AD patients and age-matched individuals without dementia were assayed on the peptide microarray and binding patterns were compared. It is hoped that these experiments will be the basis for a larger study of the diagnostic merits of the microarray-based immunoassay in dementia clinics.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011