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Addressing Childhood Trauma in the Classroom

Description

Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of

Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of maltreated children, the one sure sanctuary is school. However, this idea requires teachers to be actively involved in identifying and caring for the children who need it most. Traumatic childhood experiences leave lasting scars on its victims, so it is helpful if teachers learn how to identify and support children who have lived through them. It is unfortunate that teachers will most likely encounter children throughout their career who have experienced horrendous things, but it is a reality. With this being said, teachers need to develop an understanding of what traumatized children live with, and learn how to address these issues with skilled sensitivity. Schools are not just a place where children learn how to read and write; they build the foundation for a successful life. This project was designed to provide teachers with a necessary resource for helping children who have suffered traumatic experiences. The methodology of this project began with interviews with organizations specializing in working with traumatized children such as Arizonans for Children, Free Arts for Abused Children, The Sojourner Center, and UMOM. The next step was a review of the current literature on the subject of childhood trauma. The findings have all been compiled into one, convenient document for teacher use and distribution. Upon completion of this document, an interactive video presentation will be made available through an online education website, so that distribution will be made simpler. Hopefully, teachers will share the information with people in their networks and create a chain reaction. The goal is to make it available to as many teachers as possible, so that more children will receive the support they need.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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The Function, Regulation, and Issues of Campus Policing at Arizona State University and Beyond

Description

This project covers the history, function, and issues with campus policing in general across the United States and specifically at Arizona State University. With campus policing overall, this project discusses the issues of power and issues of race, racial profiling,

This project covers the history, function, and issues with campus policing in general across the United States and specifically at Arizona State University. With campus policing overall, this project discusses the issues of power and issues of race, racial profiling, and racism. With the Arizona State University police department, this project discusses the issues of how sexual assault has been handled, issues of transparency, lack of screening/qualifications/training, and issues of race, racial profiling, and racism. All of these issues are studied using specific cases and instances. Several suggestions for improvement are then covered, including the removal of police presence on campus, improved training, and increased accountability and transparency measures.

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Created

Date Created
2020-12

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“No Justice, No Peace”: Analyzing the Movement to Defund the Police Through a Lens of Economic Justice

Description

This thesis discusses the circumstances surrounding the movement to defund and eventually abolish the police. It introduces abolitionist theory and analyzes the economic and social factors contributing to the ideology's increasing popularity. Further, this paper examines the expenditures of several

This thesis discusses the circumstances surrounding the movement to defund and eventually abolish the police. It introduces abolitionist theory and analyzes the economic and social factors contributing to the ideology's increasing popularity. Further, this paper examines the expenditures of several police departments in Arizona and how increases in spending affect their respective cities' crime rates. According to the regression analyses conducted for this thesis, the results indicate that there is little to no correlation between law enforcement expenditures and community safety. Upon completion of that analysis, this paper discusses recommendations to redistribute public monetary resources as a means to promote economic and social justice.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Integrating Music in the Classroom

Description

A look at the benefits of the integration of music in the classroom. This thesis focuses on how music supports brain development and how that affects the ways children learn the classroom. It also highlights how current teachers feel about

A look at the benefits of the integration of music in the classroom. This thesis focuses on how music supports brain development and how that affects the ways children learn the classroom. It also highlights how current teachers feel about integrating music in the classroom and the best practices used for integrating music. Lastly, this thesis contains strategies on how to integrate music in the classroom using the Common Core standards as well as personal compositions written using Common Core standards.

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Created

Date Created
2013-05

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State-Level School Resource Officer Programs and Their Relationship to Student Demographics

Description

As a result of recent public attention on school resource officers (SROs), concerns regarding the effects of police presence in America’s schools have emerged. Despite this, little is known about how SROs and SRO programs function within the U.S. This

As a result of recent public attention on school resource officers (SROs), concerns regarding the effects of police presence in America’s schools have emerged. Despite this, little is known about how SROs and SRO programs function within the U.S. This project uses qualitative and quantitative methods to describe the six state-level programs that exist to regulate and fund SROs, as well as analyze the relationship between the schools that receive funding and their student demographics. Program elements were inconsistent among states, though some commonalities were found, such as the usage of the triad model, training sources, usage of a memorandum of understanding (MOU), and lack of regular evaluations or assessments. No relationship was found between student demographics and SRO-funded schools when compared to the overall state. The findings highlight a need for regulation and consistency among SRO programs, as well as more reliable publicly available information regarding these programs.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2019-05