Matching Items (4)

134242-Thumbnail Image.png

"Though the Heavens Fall" - Abolitionist Thought and the Future of American Justice.

Description

Abolitionist activism in 1850's America was divided among two groups of thought: disunionists, who understood the American Constitution to be a pro-slavery document, and political abolitionists, who believed the Constitution

Abolitionist activism in 1850's America was divided among two groups of thought: disunionists, who understood the American Constitution to be a pro-slavery document, and political abolitionists, who believed the Constitution was antislavery. This paper traces the origins and structures of each argument, specifically focusing on the philosophies of Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. It supplements their views with the works of other prominent abolitionists such as Lysander Spooner, Wendell Phillips and Gerrit Smith. In analyzing their rhetoric and beliefs, this paper examines the core of the contention between disunionists and political abolitionists and asserts that the chief divide between the two groups involved questions of whether the wording of the Constitution supported slavery, whether the drafters of the Constitution intended the document to condone slavery, and whether the intentions of the Constitution could be divorced from its interpretation at the hands of the American government and public. Furthermore, this paper argues that the conflict between disunionists and political abolitionists is not confined to the pages of history. It makes parallels between modern activism and the abolitionist writings of the 1850's, attempting to show that the same anti-Constitution reasoning of the disunionists permeates many present-day activists and scholars. It presents Frederick Douglass, Wendell Phillips and Gerrit Smith as proponents of a philosophy of radical constitutionalism which supports legal and cultural reform grounded in a respect for the ideals they believed were embedded within the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. This paper advocates constitutional radicalism as the most just and effective method of American reform, echoing Douglass in his faith in American idealism and the power of law and civic duty to promote national justice.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

136756-Thumbnail Image.png

Prostitution Policy: Alternatives for the U.S.

Description

This thesis intends to identify various alternatives to current prostitution policy in the United States. Specifically, this paper focuses on the proposals of abolition, legalization, and decriminalization, as they are

This thesis intends to identify various alternatives to current prostitution policy in the United States. Specifically, this paper focuses on the proposals of abolition, legalization, and decriminalization, as they are interpreted through feminist perspectives. Additionally, the effectiveness of each proposal is based on how well they would reduce the threat and perpetuation of violence, decrease the spread of venereal disease, and lower the rate of drug use amongst sex workers in the U.S. Each method is analyzed through the success and failure rates in the societies in which they have already been implemented. Ultimately, the conclusion is met that legalization would be the most effective and logical policy reform to ensure the safety of American sex workers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

130845-Thumbnail Image.png

“No Justice, No Peace”: Analyzing the Movement to Defund the Police Through a Lens of Economic Justice

Description

This thesis discusses the circumstances surrounding the movement to defund and eventually abolish the police. It introduces abolitionist theory and analyzes the economic and social factors contributing to the ideology's

This thesis discusses the circumstances surrounding the movement to defund and eventually abolish the police. It introduces abolitionist theory and analyzes the economic and social factors contributing to the ideology's increasing popularity. Further, this paper examines the expenditures of several police departments in Arizona and how increases in spending affect their respective cities' crime rates. According to the regression analyses conducted for this thesis, the results indicate that there is little to no correlation between law enforcement expenditures and community safety. Upon completion of that analysis, this paper discusses recommendations to redistribute public monetary resources as a means to promote economic and social justice.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

153733-Thumbnail Image.png

But some of them are fierce: navigating and negotiating the terrain of motherhood as formerly incarcerated and convicted women

Description

Women who are incarcerated are viewed as having departed from the hegemonic standard of motherhood, and become questionable in their roles as mothers, and are often perceived as "bad" mothers.

Women who are incarcerated are viewed as having departed from the hegemonic standard of motherhood, and become questionable in their roles as mothers, and are often perceived as "bad" mothers. While the challenges of parenting behind bars has been widely researched, there is a paucity of research that centers the experiences and challenges of mothers post-incarceration or probation and a void in the literature that attempts to view this population outside of the confines of the good/bad mother dichotomy. This dissertation explores how mothers who are formerly incarcerated or convicted describe their experiences navigating and negotiating their roles not as good or bad mothers but as fierce mothers. The concept of fierce mother exists outside of the good/bad mother binary; it is based on themes that emerged from the stories women told during our conversations about the practice of mothering. The energy of hard-won survival is what they bring to their mother roles and for many it drives their activism around prison abolition issues. Their stories challenge the normative discourse on good/bad mothers, justice, rights, freedom and dignity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015