Matching Items (7)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

COVID-19 and College Students: The Relationships among Fear of COVID-19, Preventative Behaviors, & Vaccination Intention

Description

Objective: This study looked at three key variables of fear of COVID-19, preventative behaviors, and vaccination intent among college students in the United Sates. In addition, the three key variables were compared between genders, age groups, race groups, and over

Objective: This study looked at three key variables of fear of COVID-19, preventative behaviors, and vaccination intent among college students in the United Sates. In addition, the three key variables were compared between genders, age groups, race groups, and over time to see if there were any significant findings. <br/>Method: This longitudinal study consisted of two anonymous online surveys administered on REDCap before and after a COVID-19 vaccine became available. <br/>Results: The findings suggested positive correlations between students’ fear of COVID-19 and their preventative behaviors with the passing of time. Hispanic/Latino participants had significantly higher fear of COVID-19 scores compared to Non-Hispanic Whites and other races at Wave I and II. Participants between 25 and 30 years old had a marginally greater difference fear of COVID-19 score compared to those less than 25. Females had significantly higher mean preventative behavior score than males at Wave II. There was a significant association between race/ethnicity groups and vaccination intent. <br/>Conclusion: Knowing why different groups do not engage in recommended preventative behaviors or receive vaccinations can tell us more about what tailored interventions may need to be developed and implemented to promote health and wellbeing in this population. Further research needs to be done regarding race, gender, and age and how these different groups of college students are responding to COVID-19 and why.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

148290-Thumbnail Image.png

Addressing Implicit Bias in Mental Healthcare: A Novel Health Promotion Tool for the Treatment of Minority Mental Health Patients

Description

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific life traumas that Latinos and African Americans face that can impact their mental health. Additionally, I researched a current mental health assessments tool, the Child and Adolescent Trauma Survey (CATS), and evaluated it for the use on Latino and African American patients. Face-to-face interviews with two healthcare providers were also used to analyze the CATS for its’ applicability to Latino and African American patients. Results showed that these assessments were not sufficient in capturing culturally specific life traumas of minority patients. Based on the literature review and analysis of the interviews with healthcare providers, a novel assessment tool, the Culturally Traumatic Events Questionnaire (CTEQ), was created to address the gaps that currently make up other mental health assessment tools used on minority patients.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2021-05

Pandemic Nursing School from the Student Perspective

Description

COVID-19 has drastically impacted the student learning experience this past year. Arizona State University nursing students have had to learn fundamental nursing education, clinical experience, and simulation skills virtually. Research has shown that the educational experience during the COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 has drastically impacted the student learning experience this past year. Arizona State University nursing students have had to learn fundamental nursing education, clinical experience, and simulation skills virtually. Research has shown that the educational experience during the COVID-19 pandemic has caused psychological and emotional stress on students adjusting to new university protocols and virtual learning. Two Term 8 nursing students questioned how these changes affected nursing students who are in their final semester of nursing school. The Term 8 nursing cohort was invited to participate in an anonymous online survey to provide feedback about their learning experience and recommendations for program leadership. The qualitative data was analyzed through content analysis to underline themes that portrayed the nursing students’ learning experience. The following themes were illuminated: an overall negative impact on virtual learning experiences, self-developed efforts to promote success, the aversion of using an online learning platform, and the desire for academic accommodation and faculty support during this time. Student recommendations for program leadership include requesting more hands-on experience when possible along with increased faculty lenience and understanding with course workload. Students had the opportunity to participate in a study where feedback is taken seriously and will be supplied to leadership to make changes to the ongoing academic dilemmas during the pandemic.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

Pandemic Nursing School from the Student Perspective

Description

COVID-19 has drastically impacted the student learning experience this past year. Arizona State University nursing students have had to learn fundamental nursing education, clinical experience, and simulation skills virtually. Research has shown that the educational experience during the COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 has drastically impacted the student learning experience this past year. Arizona State University nursing students have had to learn fundamental nursing education, clinical experience, and simulation skills virtually. Research has shown that the educational experience during the COVID-19 pandemic has caused psychological and emotional stress on students adjusting to new university protocols and virtual learning. Two Term 8 nursing students questioned how these changes affected nursing students who are in their final semester of nursing school. The Term 8 nursing cohort was invited to participate in an anonymous online survey to provide feedback about their learning experience and recommendations for program leadership. The qualitative data was analyzed through content analysis to underline themes that portrayed the nursing students’ learning experience. The following themes were illuminated: an overall negative impact on virtual learning experiences, self-developed efforts to promote success, the aversion of using an online learning platform, and the desire for academic accommodation and faculty support during this time. Student recommendations for program leadership include requesting more hands-on experience when possible along with increased faculty lenience and understanding with course workload. Students had the opportunity to participate in a study where feedback is taken seriously and will be supplied to leadership to make changes to the ongoing academic dilemmas during the pandemic.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

147990-Thumbnail Image.png

Discrimination & Psychological Health of Minority Nursing Staff amidst COVID-19

Description

In a healthcare system already struggling with burnout among its professionals, the COVID-19 pandemic presented a barrage of personal and occupational strife to US healthcare workers. Structural and everyday discrimination contributed to the health inequities of people of color in

In a healthcare system already struggling with burnout among its professionals, the COVID-19 pandemic presented a barrage of personal and occupational strife to US healthcare workers. Structural and everyday discrimination contributed to the health inequities of people of color in the US, exacerbated by COVID-19-related racism and xenophobia. There is little research regarding the effects of COVID-19 and related and/or concurring discrimination upon minority nursing staff, despite their importance in supporting the diverse American patient population with culturally competent, tireless care amid the pandemic. This cross-sectional survey study aimed to examine 1) the relationships between discrimination, social support, resilience, and quality of life among minority nursing staff in the US during COVID-19, and 2) the differences of discrimination, social support resilience, and quality of life among minority nursing staff between different racial/ethnic groups during COVID-19. The sample (n = 514) included Black/African American (n = 161, 31.4%), Latinx/Hispanic (n = 131, 25.5%), Asian (n = 87, 17%), Native American/Alaskan Native (n = 69, 13.5%), and Pacific Islander (n = 65, 12.7%) nursing staff from 47 US states. The multiple regression results showed that witnessing discrimination was associated with a lower quality of life score, while higher social support and resilience scores were associated with higher quality of life scores across all racial groups. Furthermore, while participants from all racial groups witnessed and experienced discrimination, Hispanic/Latinx nursing staff experienced discrimination most commonly, alongside having lowest quality of life and highest resilience scores. Native American/Alaskan Native nursing staff had similarly high discrimination and low quality of life, although low resilience scores. Our findings suggest that minority nursing staff who have higher COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates (Hispanic/Latinx, Native American/Alaskan Native) were left more vulnerable to negative effects from discrimination. Hispanic/Latinx nursing staff reported a relatively higher resilience score than all other groups, potentially attributed to the positive effects of biculturality in the workplace, however, the low average quality of life score suggests a simultaneous erosion of well-being. Compared to all other groups, Native American and Alaskan Native nursing staff’s low resilience and quality of life scores suggest a potential compounding effect of historical trauma affecting their well-being, especially in contrast to Hispanic/Latinx nursing staff. This study has broader implications for research on the lasting effects of COVID-19 on minority healthcare workers’ and communities’ well-being, especially regarding Hispanic/Latinx and Native American/Alaskan Native nursing staff.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

The Impact of Animal Companionship on College Student Depression and Anxiety during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Description

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged on an international scale, the disruption of routine and social interactions caused challenges in mental health, as people began to self-isolate and confine themselves from the world. Although the sudden interruption of social interaction led

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged on an international scale, the disruption of routine and social interactions caused challenges in mental health, as people began to self-isolate and confine themselves from the world. Although the sudden interruption of social interaction led to stress and anxiety, human-animal interactions have shown a decrease in stress, anxiety, depression, and feelings of loneliness and social isolation. The purpose of this thesis is to determine whether companion animals influence mental health, specifically depression and anxiety, in college-aged students who attended the Arizona State University Downtown Campus during the 2020-2021 academic school year.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

162245-Thumbnail Image.png

Impact of COVID-19 on Undergraduate Student Mental Health and Baccalaureate Success: A Scoping Review

Description

This scoping review provides a synthesis of research which maps the literature on the topic of COVID-19 related impact on Undergraduate Student Mental Health and Baccalaureate Success. The purpose of this review was to identify existing literature pertaining to the

This scoping review provides a synthesis of research which maps the literature on the topic of COVID-19 related impact on Undergraduate Student Mental Health and Baccalaureate Success. The purpose of this review was to identify existing literature pertaining to the psychological repercussions of COVID-19 on the undergraduate population, describe the range of successful interventions used to reduce stress and demand on the U.S. undergraduate population during a pandemic, and identify implications for future research. Due to the novelty of coronavirus and limited research on the given topic, this review provides a framework of available research by identifying types of available research, identifying how research is conducted on the topic, identifying and analyzing knowledge gaps, and clarifies key concepts in literature.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-12