Matching Items (3)

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DACAmented:Lives Within Borders: An Ethnographic Study on Latino Identity

Description

This ethnographic study investigates the lives and identities of immigrant youth in Arizona. It explores their efforts to resolve their Mexican and American identities as shifting immigration policies threaten their

This ethnographic study investigates the lives and identities of immigrant youth in Arizona. It explores their efforts to resolve their Mexican and American identities as shifting immigration policies threaten their immigration status. These youths are DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients, former unauthorized migrants brought to the United States as children by their families and granted temporary lawful status and work authorization by the Obama administration in 2012. Arizona is home to nearly 26,000 DACA recipients. Through participant observation, and in-depth interviews (structured and unstructured), this study examines DACA recipients' distinctive and ambivalent integration as Americans. The author's own experience as a DACA recipient provides an insider's perspective, creating an auto-ethnographic exploration of identity that opens insights into the experiences of others. Narratives elicited from eleven DACAmented young adults provide an ethnographic lens through which to explore the complex concept of belonging, an often-contradictory attempt to find acceptance in American society while also embracing their cross-border cultural formation. Examination of their everyday experiences shows that the acknowledged privileges granted by the DACA program do effectively further enculturate DACA recipients into American society; yet capricious U.S. and Arizona immigration policies simultaneously contest the legitimacy of DACA recipients' decisive inclusion into the state and the nation. The coherence of their identities is thus destabilized, obligating them to adopt identities that are either fixed, conflictual, fluid, or new.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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"They Say We Are Criminals": The Stress, Fears, and Hopes of Migrant Dairy Workers as a Result of U.S Immigration Policies

Description

Agricultural and dairy work is among the most dangerous work in the US. In addition to the dangers of work, undocumented migrant workers may face additional stress as a result

Agricultural and dairy work is among the most dangerous work in the US. In addition to the dangers of work, undocumented migrant workers may face additional stress as a result of the increase in antiimmigration enforcement and criminalization of undocumented status. The purpose of the study was to better understand how migrant dairy workers were impacted by the increase in restrictive immigration policies and immigration enforcement, as well as how they coped with any issues they faced. Interviews were conducted with fourteen migrant dairy workers following the passage of several anti-immigration bills across the US. Findings revealed four major categories; three were related to negative impacts of immigration policies and enforcement:

1. Fear.
2. Stress and anxiety.
3. Perceptions of discrimination.

An additional major category emerged that demonstrated the hope and resilience of participants in the face of an increasingly difficult socio-political environment. Implications for social service practice, policy, and research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Anti-Immigration Policies and Fear of Deportation: A Human Rights Issue

Description

This report examines how recent immigration policies and immigration enforcement strategies have impacted Latino immigrants in Arizona. Analyses examined the relationship between fear of deportation and the impact of immigration

This report examines how recent immigration policies and immigration enforcement strategies have impacted Latino immigrants in Arizona. Analyses examined the relationship between fear of deportation and the impact of immigration policies on various aspects of daily life of Latino immigrants as a result of US immigration policies. Results indicate that participants who reported a greater fear of deportation were also significantly more likely to report:

1. Trouble keeping a job.
2. Trouble finding a job.
3. Having been asked for immigration documents.
4. That friends have suffered.
5. That their family has suffered.
6. Lower confidence that police will treat Latino immigrants fairly.
7. Lower confidence that the courts will treat Latino immigrants fairly.
8. Lower confidence that they will have a better future.

Implications for social work practice, advocacy, and research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016