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Reggio Emilia in the American Middle School

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The Reggio Emilia Approach to early childhood education is touted as one of the best educational philosophies for teaching young students. The approach emphasizes project-based learning, multiple intelligences, and community involvement, among other key tenets. While Reggio is growing in

The Reggio Emilia Approach to early childhood education is touted as one of the best educational philosophies for teaching young students. The approach emphasizes project-based learning, multiple intelligences, and community involvement, among other key tenets. While Reggio is growing in popularity worldwide, little research exists measuring the true efficacy of the approach. This study identifies research-based pedagogical best practices that support the elements central to the Reggio classroom. The study also explores adapting the Reggio Emilia Approach to the upper-elementary or middle school classroom. The approach is traditionally meant for early childhood, but its research-backed strategies could benefit students of any age group. The study is followed by three sample lesson plans, demonstrating how elements of the Reggio Emilia Approach could be adapted into a middle school English curriculum.

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2018-05

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How Asian American Educators Consider Their Socio-Cultural Identity Markers

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This literature review synthesized 15 studies about how Asian American K-12 educators in the United States considered their socio-cultural identity markers. The current literature largely revolves around the lack of representation of Asian Americans in teaching, and few studies exist

This literature review synthesized 15 studies about how Asian American K-12 educators in the United States considered their socio-cultural identity markers. The current literature largely revolves around the lack of representation of Asian Americans in teaching, and few studies exist about the experiences of the few Asian Americans who do become teachers. Studies included in this paper are related to the topics of Asian American pre-service and in-service teaching experiences, Asian American identity consideration, and pedagogical practices used by Asian American teachers. This paper seeks to understand and report on the various racialized experiences of Asian Americans and how their pedagogies are affected by their consideration of their identity.

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2020-05

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Addressing Childhood Trauma in the Classroom

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Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of

Over the past few years, the issue of childhood trauma in the United States has become significant. A growing number of children are experiencing abuse, neglect, or some other form of maltreatment each year. Considering the stressful home lives of maltreated children, the one sure sanctuary is school. However, this idea requires teachers to be actively involved in identifying and caring for the children who need it most. Traumatic childhood experiences leave lasting scars on its victims, so it is helpful if teachers learn how to identify and support children who have lived through them. It is unfortunate that teachers will most likely encounter children throughout their career who have experienced horrendous things, but it is a reality. With this being said, teachers need to develop an understanding of what traumatized children live with, and learn how to address these issues with skilled sensitivity. Schools are not just a place where children learn how to read and write; they build the foundation for a successful life. This project was designed to provide teachers with a necessary resource for helping children who have suffered traumatic experiences. The methodology of this project began with interviews with organizations specializing in working with traumatized children such as Arizonans for Children, Free Arts for Abused Children, The Sojourner Center, and UMOM. The next step was a review of the current literature on the subject of childhood trauma. The findings have all been compiled into one, convenient document for teacher use and distribution. Upon completion of this document, an interactive video presentation will be made available through an online education website, so that distribution will be made simpler. Hopefully, teachers will share the information with people in their networks and create a chain reaction. The goal is to make it available to as many teachers as possible, so that more children will receive the support they need.

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2016-05

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The Effectiveness of Math Digital Learning Tools and Their Place in the Classroom

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Digital learning tools have become ubiquitous in virtual and in person classrooms as teachers found creative ways to engage students during the COVID 19 pandemic. Even before the pandemic and widespread remote learning, however, digital learning tools were increasingly common

Digital learning tools have become ubiquitous in virtual and in person classrooms as teachers found creative ways to engage students during the COVID 19 pandemic. Even before the pandemic and widespread remote learning, however, digital learning tools were increasingly common and a typical part of many classrooms. While all digital learning tools are worthy of study, math digital learning tools (MDLTs) designed for K - 8th grade in particular raise questions of efficacy and usefulness for classrooms. This paper shows that MDLTs are an effective tool to raise students’ math achievement across K - 8th grade, and that time spent on MDLTs can lead to better understanding of a topic than traditional, teacher led instruction. However, if the MDLT is being delivered in a language the student is not familiar with, that student will not be able to benefit from MDLTs in the way other students do. This is also true of students who receive Special Education services. Additionally, higher quality MDLTs that provide feedback that attaches meaning to students’ work creates a better learning environment for students than one with simpler feedback. Based on my experiences with student teaching this year and using the popular MDLT IXL frequently, I recommend that MDLTs not just be used for independent practice time, but for whole class, problem solving sessions where students have to use mathematical thinking in new content areas. This will build deeper conceptual learning and a greater sense of achievement in students.

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2021-05