Matching Items (109)

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Reggio Emilia in the American Middle School

Description

The Reggio Emilia Approach to early childhood education is touted as one of the best educational philosophies for teaching young students. The approach emphasizes project-based learning, multiple intelligences, and community involvement, among other key tenets. While Reggio is growing in

The Reggio Emilia Approach to early childhood education is touted as one of the best educational philosophies for teaching young students. The approach emphasizes project-based learning, multiple intelligences, and community involvement, among other key tenets. While Reggio is growing in popularity worldwide, little research exists measuring the true efficacy of the approach. This study identifies research-based pedagogical best practices that support the elements central to the Reggio classroom. The study also explores adapting the Reggio Emilia Approach to the upper-elementary or middle school classroom. The approach is traditionally meant for early childhood, but its research-backed strategies could benefit students of any age group. The study is followed by three sample lesson plans, demonstrating how elements of the Reggio Emilia Approach could be adapted into a middle school English curriculum.

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2018-05

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Liminal Space

Description

Liminal Space is a pen-and-paper roleplaying game designed to facilitate performative, personalized, and critical exploration of identity, value and truth dissensus; contemporary social, technological, political, and environmental issues; and modes of relating to socio-technical change, instability, and uncertainty. Pen-and-paper roleplaying

Liminal Space is a pen-and-paper roleplaying game designed to facilitate performative, personalized, and critical exploration of identity, value and truth dissensus; contemporary social, technological, political, and environmental issues; and modes of relating to socio-technical change, instability, and uncertainty. Pen-and-paper roleplaying games emerge from a 40-year history as an entertainment medium, but in recent decades have displayed the ability to personally speak to more "serious" issues. Mechanically, they combine elements of classroom or public-engagement, pedagogic, roleplaying exercises with benefits or participatory scenario construction, allowing players to immerse themselves in bespoke situations reflecting their personal interests, anxieties, and pedagogic aims and to reflexively and critically engage with contested truths or social disruptions in a safe space. Formal studies of roleplaying games are sparse, and I, the author, hope that Liminal Space can draw more study to a unique communication, entertainments, and performance medium and to the unique communities that surround it.

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2018-05

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Rediscovering Education by Way of Mindfulness: A Critique of Current Practices and a Possible Solution

Description

In this thesis, I intend to articulate four main arguments: (1) that the current state of public K-12
education in America is dire and in critical need of reform, (2) this dire state is evidenced by
statistics reporting

In this thesis, I intend to articulate four main arguments: (1) that the current state of public K-12
education in America is dire and in critical need of reform, (2) this dire state is evidenced by
statistics reporting that both student test scores and mental health are declining, (3) these issues
are perpetuated by recent efforts to implement extreme amounts of digital technology into
classrooms, rigid standardization and assessment-based learning, and the lack of attention paid to
philosophy and religion in public K-12 curricula, and (4) that many of these issues could be
resolved through the implementation of a curriculum teaching “mindfulness”. “Mindfulness” has
many different interpretations, but for this thesis will refer to an umbrella of skills that can be
taught and honed through critically reading and discussing philosophical and religious texts, as
well as engaging in different types of meditative practices. Skills such as logical and deductive
reasoning, ethics, emotional regulation, debate, public speaking, goal-setting, organization, and
planning. Practices and exercises found in philosophy, but many students may not necessarily be
accustomed to (meditation, yoga, silent prayer, stoic contemplation), would be read about,
practiced, and/or discussed, likely before class discussions on the day’s text. Implementing such
a curriculum can occur at varying degrees of intensity, with increasing levels of effectiveness
with each increase in the intensity of implementation.

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Date Created
2019-05

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How Asian American Educators Consider Their Socio-Cultural Identity Markers

Description

This literature review synthesized 15 studies about how Asian American K-12 educators in the United States considered their socio-cultural identity markers. The current literature largely revolves around the lack of representation of Asian Americans in teaching, and few studies exist

This literature review synthesized 15 studies about how Asian American K-12 educators in the United States considered their socio-cultural identity markers. The current literature largely revolves around the lack of representation of Asian Americans in teaching, and few studies exist about the experiences of the few Asian Americans who do become teachers. Studies included in this paper are related to the topics of Asian American pre-service and in-service teaching experiences, Asian American identity consideration, and pedagogical practices used by Asian American teachers. This paper seeks to understand and report on the various racialized experiences of Asian Americans and how their pedagogies are affected by their consideration of their identity.

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2020-05

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Responding to the Needs and Challenges of Arts Entrepreneurs: An Exploratory Study of Arts Entrepreneurship in North Carolina Higher Education

Description

To address the call for examination of academic and professional approaches to arts entrepreneurship, we summarize the academic arts entrepreneurship programs in the State of North Carolina and conduct a pilot study with data gathered from arts entrepreneurs who attended

To address the call for examination of academic and professional approaches to arts entrepreneurship, we summarize the academic arts entrepreneurship programs in the State of North Carolina and conduct a pilot study with data gathered from arts entrepreneurs who attended the 5th annual Southern Entrepreneurship in the Arts Conference in Greensboro, North Carolina. Our review of the descriptive data reveals that arts entrepreneurs face a variety of needs and challenges, which are psychological (e.g., peer support) as well as technical (e.g., start-up skills). These findings suggest that, as prior literature stresses, arts entrepreneurship education programs should entail both the “entrepreneurship mindset” aspect and the “venture creation” aspect, so we advocate a holistic approach that combines both these perspectives with other related courses. We conclude, based on our exploratory study, that collaborative and flexible approaches, such as cross-campus programs for arts entrepreneurship education in higher education, could have beneficial outcomes for art entrepreneurs. Implications for future research are discussed.

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2014-09-18

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Barriers to Recognizing Arts Entrepreneurship Education as Essential to Professional Arts Training

Description

While many professional arts training programs prepare students to excel at the practice and performance of the arts, evidence suggests that many professional arts training programs may be failing to prepare students to be professional artists. A total of 11.1%

While many professional arts training programs prepare students to excel at the practice and performance of the arts, evidence suggests that many professional arts training programs may be failing to prepare students to be professional artists. A total of 11.1% of all recent college graduates with undergraduate arts degrees are unemployed (Carnevale, Cheah, & Strohl, 2012, p. 7).

Fifty-two percent of arts undergraduate alumni reported being dissatisfied with their institution’s ability to advise them about further career or education opportunities (SNAAP, 2012, p. 14). Eighty-one percent of all arts undergraduate alumni reported having a primary job outside of the arts for reasons of job security (SNAAP, 2012, p. 19). Many arts higher education administrators address the situation by advising arts students to attend business and entrepreneurship courses. However, these courses are often taught or presented outside of an arts training context. Arts entrepreneurship education can serve as contextual business/career/technology education for arts students; however, barriers make it difficult for administrators to create adequate curricular room for arts entrepreneurship education.

Furthermore, the teaching and learning of contextual business/career/technology education in professional arts training programs may often be thought of as helpful but not essential, as evidenced by the National Office of Arts Accreditation (NOAA) classification of these types of courses as general education units. This essay supports the need for arts entrepreneurship education, and discusses key barriers to recognizing arts entrepreneurship education as essential to professional arts training.

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Date Created
2013-09-02

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Dostoevsky's "The Grand Inquisitor": Adding an Ethical Component to the Teaching of Non-market Entrepreneurship

Description

The premise of this essay is that the study of ethics is an essential component in teaching all forms of “non-market entrepreneurship,” that is, all forms of entrepreneurship not undertaken solely for commercial purposes. In non-market entrepreneurship, such as arts

The premise of this essay is that the study of ethics is an essential component in teaching all forms of “non-market entrepreneurship,” that is, all forms of entrepreneurship not undertaken solely for commercial purposes. In non-market entrepreneurship, such as arts entrepreneurship, social enterprise, or social entrepreneurship, at least one other purpose instead of or in addition to profit motivates acting entrepreneurially. In this essay we show how we add an ethical component to teaching social entrepreneurship in a discussion-based seminar in an American university. The thrust of our effort is to require students read Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “The Grand Inquisitor” and the Father Zossima portions from The Brothers Karamazov, originally published in Russian in 1863 as a seminal work in the golden age of Russian literature. Through the instructor’s structured and directed discussion of the text, students are presented with the argument that a personal ethic of “loving humility” as embodied in the character of Father Zossima might serve as an appropriate ethical guide for non-market entrepreneurship.

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2013-02-16

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Frameworks for Educating the Artist of the Future: Teaching Habits of Mind for Arts Entrepreneurship

Description

This essay looks at pedagogies that can be deployed to teach the habits of mind that support arts entrepreneurship through the lenses of frameworks developed by Gardner, Duening, and Costa & Kallick for conceptualizing ways of thinking. It draws a

This essay looks at pedagogies that can be deployed to teach the habits of mind that support arts entrepreneurship through the lenses of frameworks developed by Gardner, Duening, and Costa & Kallick for conceptualizing ways of thinking. It draws a network of connections between these frameworks for ways of thinking on which are mapped various pedagogies for teaching arts entrepreneurs as employed in educational programs and as described in recent literature. After first briefly summarizing each of these frameworks, I graphically describe the ways these various frameworks may overlap and then offer examples of pedagogies that support the development of entrepreneurial habits of mind for artists and others.

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2013-02-16

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Infusing Entrepreneurship Within Non-business Disciplines: Preparing Artists and Others for Self-employment and Entrepreneurship

Description

The demand for interdisciplinary and cross campus courses has increased substantially over the past few years resulting in increased program offerings and modifications to existing coursework in universities across the nation. This is very clearly evident in the arts realm.

The demand for interdisciplinary and cross campus courses has increased substantially over the past few years resulting in increased program offerings and modifications to existing coursework in universities across the nation. This is very clearly evident in the arts realm. However, there is no clear agreement of knowledge, skills and abilities deemed important to the success of selfemployed artists and arts entrepreneurs. This essay presents qualitative data collected from personal conversations and other data collected over the past several years from students and faculty members engaged in lessons learned from The Coleman Foundation Faculty Fellows Program, a national initiative of The Coleman Foundation. Building upon the lessons learned from this initiative a framework is presented to embed entrepreneurship content across several arts subjects. Suggestions for conceiving and designing entrepreneurship course content are portrayed. The “modules” approach to the infusion of entrepreneurship within the arts and other disciplines are presented. Assessment methods to measure the impact of using such modules to infuse entrepreneurship are explained. Pedagogical constructs and pedagogical resources are presented. The implications for future research are postulated and suggested.

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Date Created
2013-02-16

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An Ultrasonographic Investigation of Horn Articulation

Description

This study is an ultrasonographic inquiry into articulation on the French horn. Previous attempts into imaging the tongue have been made, but ultrasonography has recently proven a useful tool for pedagogical inquiry on the topic though it has never before

This study is an ultrasonographic inquiry into articulation on the French horn. Previous attempts into imaging the tongue have been made, but ultrasonography has recently proven a useful tool for pedagogical inquiry on the topic though it has never before been used in studying a brass instrument. In this pilot study a test subject performed a variety of tasks on the French horn while undergoing ultrasound imaging. Ultrasound images of the subject's tongue were synchronized with audio recording of the performance and the resulting data was qualitatively analyzed and compared with the standing pedagogical beliefs on the topic. The study showed that some of the current beliefs on the mechanism of articulation are false. The study also showed that ultrasonography is a useful method for investigating brass pedagogy and could be used for inquiry in the future.

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Date Created
2014-05