Matching Items (17)

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Depression Screening and Breastfeeding Support in a Community Breastfeeding Clinic

Description

Purpose: Implementation of a postpartum depression (PPD) screening while using evidence-based interventions to improve depressive symptoms, enhance breastfeeding (BF) self-efficacy, and strengthen the mother-infant dyad (MID).

Background and Significance: PPD is

Purpose: Implementation of a postpartum depression (PPD) screening while using evidence-based interventions to improve depressive symptoms, enhance breastfeeding (BF) self-efficacy, and strengthen the mother-infant dyad (MID).

Background and Significance: PPD is highly prevalent among women living in the United States and threatens the physical and psychological health of MIDs. Many of these women go undiagnosed and without treatment, further worsening symptoms and outcomes. This has inspired world healthcare leaders and organizations to address maternal mental health among postpartum women.

Methods: A 12-week evidenced-based project consisted of two-sets of participants including mothers and staff. A comprehensive maternal support program guided by an informational pamphlet (IP) and implementation of PPD screening using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale served as the two-part intervention for this project. Goals were to decrease PPD, enhance BF satisfaction, and strengthen the MID. Comprehensive maternal support encompasses interventions proven to meet the project goals and includes tailored BF education and care to maternal needs, social support by peer/family involvement, skin-to-skin contact during BF, emotion-regulation strategies, and availability of community resources.

Outcomes: The BSES-SF scores did result in statistical significance based on an alpha value of 0.10, t(3) = -2.98, p = .059, proving a positive effect was seen in breastfeeding self-efficacy post intervention. The results did not show statistical significance (t(3) = 0.60, p = .591) in regard to pre and post-depression scores. However, the mean pre-score (M =3.50, SD 3.11) did decrease post-intervention (M =2.75, SD 1.26) and exemplifies clinical significance.

Conclusion: The outcomes of this Quality-Improvement project showed improved scores for depression and BF self-efficacy post-intervention. This demonstrates the value in screening for PPD using a validated screening tool and instituting comprehensive maternal support guided by evidence-based practice in a community setting.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-25

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Implementing Breastfeeding Education Into a Perinatal Medication Assisted Recovery Program

Description

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic, complex health condition that continues to be a growing problem in the general population, and this increase is paralleled in pregnant women. Pregnancy

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic, complex health condition that continues to be a growing problem in the general population, and this increase is paralleled in pregnant women. Pregnancy is a time when women with OUD may be ready to begin a journey of recovery. OUD has both maternal and fetal implications. The safest way to begin recovery during pregnancy is with the initiation of either buprenorphine or methadone to prevent symptoms of withdrawal which can increase risk of fetal harm.

Both medications have the added benefit of being safe to use during lactation. There is a minimal amount of either medication that is found in breastmilk. Breastfeeding during medication assisted recovery (MAR) is linked both to improved maternal and neonatal outcomes, and improved bonding. Often women who are engaged in MAR are unaware of the benefits of breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity. Mothers may perceive breastfeeding as a danger to their baby based on misinformation and bias. Initiation of individualized and nonjudgmental breastfeeding education to women beginning an inpatient MAR program can improve maternal understanding of the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding and increase intention to exclusively breastfeed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-02

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The Effect of Tongue-Tie Revisions on Breastfeeding Outcomes

Description

A short and thickened lingual frenulum characterizes tongue-ties. Infants with this condition are likely to have issues with their latch, weight gain, and the ability to breastfeed exclusively. Mothers typically

A short and thickened lingual frenulum characterizes tongue-ties. Infants with this condition are likely to have issues with their latch, weight gain, and the ability to breastfeed exclusively. Mothers typically struggle with nipple pain and trauma. Tongue-tie procedures have become increasingly more popular as families turn to this intervention when struggling with breastfeeding.

The purpose of this quality improvement project is to collect data on tongue-tie revision procedures to explore the benefits, risks, and patient satisfaction with the clinical process. Questionnaires were created to collect information on tongue-tie revisions. Participants were asked to identify symptoms related both to the mother and infant. The type of feeding was assessed before and after to identify if the tongue-tie revisions increased exclusive breastfeeding. Likert-type scales were used to address maternal nipple pain, overall improvements in breastfeeding, and patient experience.

A total of 36 participants completed the pre-op questionnaire, and 22 completed the post-op questionnaires over four months. The results found that this was a low-risk procedure that helped improve breastfeeding or maternal and infant symptoms. There should be continued efforts to find ways to continue to collect this data, as it will increase the awareness of tongue-tie’s effect on breastfeeding.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-04-01

Patterns of Breastfeeding and Diet and the Effects on Infant Weight and Growth

Description

The period of time between birth and 24 months of age is a sensitive period for infant growth, and adequate nutrition is vitally important. In this study, 150 Mexican-American mother-and-child

The period of time between birth and 24 months of age is a sensitive period for infant growth, and adequate nutrition is vitally important. In this study, 150 Mexican-American mother-and-child pairs (N = 300) were periodically surveyed over the course of 36 months for demographics, financial status, and feeding practices to understand the feeding methods of Mexican-American families and any relations they may have to the weight and growth of developing infants. Results found that formula feeding had higher rates of usage and duration than breastfeeding, while solid foods were largely introduced at the recommended ages. At one year of age, the infants were predisposed towards overweight and obesity with a high maternal BMI, suggesting that breastfeeding practices were not fully utilized. However, the data did not differentiate between formula and breast milk when both were used at any specific age, making it difficult to determine how long infants were exclusively breastfed and how that would impact their growth.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Low-Income Mexican-American Mothers and Infants and the Effects of Breastfeeding on Obesity Rates

Description

This research addresses the importance of factors such as gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight of mothers, as well as obesity rates in infants born to these mothers who

This research addresses the importance of factors such as gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight of mothers, as well as obesity rates in infants born to these mothers who are included in the population of low-income Mexican-American mothers and infants enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Evaluating these factors will contribute to finding recommendations to help solve the obesity epidemic in this specific population. Breastfeeding duration, mother BMI, infant birth weight, and infant weight z-scores were statistically analyzed from a WIC population in Houston. The study participants are involved in a five year intervention study where the home environment and education on feeding practices, breastfeeding duration and obesity are evaluated. The results found that: (1) breastfeeding initially indicates a further continuation of breastfeeding; (2) mothers who breastfed for six months were likely to have a lower BMI at twelve to eighteen months than those who did not; (3) the birth weight of the infant is associated with the weight pattern of the child later; (4) the weight/height percentiles of a newborn are somewhat likely to stay the same until age three; (5) the prenatal weight of the mother impacts the weight of the newborn infant; and (6) the mother's postpartum BMI at one week is associated with a similar BMI at 12 months postpartum. In conclusion, women in this population tend to not breastfeed for 6 months and are not losing gestational weight postpartum, leading to increased wright retention after pregnancy, as well as heavier babies that will maintain this weight in early childhood. Further breastfeeding, nutrition, exercise, obesity, and proper infant feeding education are needed to reduce the rate of obesity in low-income Mexican-American WIC populations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes of Perinatal Substance Abuse

Description

Objectives: To measure nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding, assess nurses' attitudes towards perinatal substance abuse, and identify the perception of breastfeeding infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Design: Descriptive study.

Objectives: To measure nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding, assess nurses' attitudes towards perinatal substance abuse, and identify the perception of breastfeeding infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Design: Descriptive study. Setting: Online survey. Participants: Nurses (N=104) who are members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and subscribe to their perinatal listserv were invited to participate via email. Methods: Participants completed a survey, which included a modified version of the Attitudes about Drug Abuse in Pregnancy (AADAP) questionnaire, knowledge questions, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Statistical analysis was conducted. Results: Most nurses (88.46%) have cared for a newborn affected by NAS or their mother before, and every respondent has cared for an opioid-addicted patient. Most nurse respondents (82.69%) reported breastfeeding being a very common topic of discussion with patients, yet 78 (75%) reported being poorly prepared by nursing school in this topic. Despite this, the majority answered the knowledge questions correctly. Most respondents (94.23%) reported that they would assess the possibility of breastfeeding for women who used drugs during pregnancy, and 39.42% expressed that prenatal drug use should be considered child abuse. Conclusion: Despite feeling angry at mothers who perinatally abuse drugs, nurses recognize the benefits of breastfeeding for these patients. Self-assessment can help nurses identify personal bias and implement evidence-based nursing interventions

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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How Does Breastfeeding Relate to Postparum Depression and Weight in Mexican American Women

Description

The goal of this study is to explore the relationship between breastfeeding, postpartum depression and postpartum weight at 1 and 6 months.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Literature review: A Comparison between the US and Australia of Economic Factors affecting breastfeeding and Policies to Increase Breastfeeding in the Workplace

Description

Breastfeeding has been shown by a number of studies to have numerous benefits on both the mother and the infant. Major health organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO),

Breastfeeding has been shown by a number of studies to have numerous benefits on both the mother and the infant. Major health organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO), now agree that breastfeeding should be encouraged and supported in all countries. But like many things, the wheels of the law are slow to catch up with scientific evident. Although breastfeeding is supported, working women do not have the option of breastfeeding without consequences. For example, in 2003, Kirstie Marshall, a then member of parliament in Australia was ejected from the lower house chamber on February 23, for breastfeeding her baby [3]. According to standing order 30 at the time, "Unless by order of the House, no Member of this House shall presume to bring any stranger into any part of the House appropriated to the Members of this House while the House, or a Committee of the whole House, is sitting" [3]. The rules did not specify the age of strangers, so the then 11-day-old baby, Charlotte Louise and her mother were shown the exit door of parliament. She had to choose between being present at times of major discussions or leaving the house to breastfeed her child, she chose to leave. More recent statistics show that developed nations like the US and Australia which also have high rates of women employment had low rates of breastfeeding. This might mean that workplace policies do not favor breastfeeding or expressing milk at work. Fortunately, laws have since been introduced in both the United States and Australia that support breastfeeding at the workplace. The next step would be to access how these laws affect breastfeeding statistics and how variation between these two countries like the paid parental leave in Australia (which is not present in all US states) would affect these numbers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Examining Health Professionals' Breastfeeding Knowledge

Description

Breastfeeding has been shown to dramatically improve health outcomes for both infants and mothers. Despite recommendations by almost all world and national health organizations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months

Breastfeeding has been shown to dramatically improve health outcomes for both infants and mothers. Despite recommendations by almost all world and national health organizations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months and to continue breastfeeding for one year, this goal is not met by the majority of women in the United States for multiple reasons. Health professionals, including physicians and nurses, can play a major role in educating and influencing mothers about breastfeeding, especially for women with comorbidities, taking medications, or undergoing medical procedures. An online survey was created to evaluate healthcare professionals' breastfeeding knowledge and opinions at a large hospital in Phoenix, Arizona using QuestionPro software. This survey was distributed for three weeks to the nursing and physician departments at the hospital in primarily the obstetric and post partum units. Of the seventy-nine individuals who completed the survey, the respondents were primarily female obstetric nurses. Respondents recognized the benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and infant, believed health professionals can influence the decision to breastfeed, and found a lack of support was the number one reason women discontinue breastfeeding. Despite this information, it is apparent from this survey, and similar studies in the past, that there are significant gaps in knowledge especially when it comes to contraindications to breastfeeding, medications used while breastfeeding, fluid intake during breastfeeding, and foods that can be consumed while breastfeeding. Additionally, the majority of the nurses who completed this survey did not believe their schooling adequately trained them in breastfeeding education and hands-on practice. This information could be used in future studies to guide breastfeeding education for nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals at the stated hospital and other facilities across the nation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Development of a Clinically Relevant Brochure About the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative

Description

The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was created in 1991 with the goal to provide support and education to mothers on breastfeeding in order to increase the rate and duration

The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was created in 1991 with the goal to provide support and education to mothers on breastfeeding in order to increase the rate and duration of breastfeeding across the world. Despite being around for over 20 years, it has only been successfully incorporated into 245 hospitals in the United States as of 2015. Due to the many benefits this initiative brings to mothers, infants, and the hospitals themselves as well as being shown to increase the incidence, duration, and exclusivity of breastfeeding, the goal of this project was to create a mother friendly brochure sharing this. The brochure was created in order to spread the word of the BFHI to expecting mothers so that they are informed and able to use this information to not only improve their own child-birthing experience but also push for implementation in their delivering facilities. The brochure covers additional topics such as breastfeeding benefits and tips, lactation resources, and steps to incorporate into their own hospital stay if outside of a BFHI facility in order to get a few of the benefits that the Baby Friendly Initiative provides. The brochure was tested for clarity, effectiveness, and for overall reactions in a study conducted at a local women's clinic surveying expectant mothers through the use of a short survey. These results were used to make minor improvements to the brochure before moving on to plans of how to disseminate the brochure to more clinics within the Phoenix area. The dissemination of this brochure will share this important information with women of childbearing age and hopefully lead to greater knowledge and progress towards improved maternal and neonatal outcomes.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05