Matching Items (9)

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Future of Wastewater Sensing Workshop Guide

Description

The Future of Wastewater Sensing workshop is part of a collaboration between Arizona State University Center for Nanotechnology in Society in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society,

The Future of Wastewater Sensing workshop is part of a collaboration between Arizona State University Center for Nanotechnology in Society in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society, the Biodesign Institute’s Center for Environmental Security, LC Nano, and the Nano-enabled Water Treatment (NEWT) Systems NSF Engineering Research Center. The Future of Wastewater Sensing workshop explores how technologies for studying, monitoring, and mining wastewater and sewage sludge might develop in the future, and what consequences may ensue for public health, law enforcement, private industry, regulations and society at large. The workshop pays particular attention to how wastewater sensing (and accompanying research, technologies, and applications) can be innovated, regulated, and used to maximize societal benefit and minimize the risk of adverse outcomes, when addressing critical social and environmental challenges.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-11-01

Mobile Waterway Monitor

Description

The Mobile Waterway Monitor seeks to monitor water in an unexplored way. The module is buoyant and will float with the current as well as harvests solar energy. In short,

The Mobile Waterway Monitor seeks to monitor water in an unexplored way. The module is buoyant and will float with the current as well as harvests solar energy. In short, the Mobile Waterway Monitor excels in size constraints, flexibility, extensibility, and capability. This current following monitor can show both measured trends like pH and interpolated trends like water speed, river contours, and elevation drop. The MWM strikes a balance between accuracy, portability, and being multi-purpose.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Damage Detection and Quantification in Advanced Foam-core composites

Description

Composite structures, particularly carbon-fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been subject to significant development in recent years. They have become increasingly reliable, durable, and versatile, finding a role in a wide

Composite structures, particularly carbon-fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been subject to significant development in recent years. They have become increasingly reliable, durable, and versatile, finding a role in a wide variety of applications. When compared to conventional materials, CFRPs have several advantages, including extremely high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and very low weight. However, the application of CFRPs and other fiber-matrix composites is complicated due to the manner in which damage propagates throughout the structure, and the associated difficulty in identifying and repairing such damages prior to structural failure. In this paper, a methods of detecting and localizing delaminations withint a complex foam-core composite structure using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health montoring (SHM) is investigated. The two NDE techniques utilized are flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonic C-Scan, which were used to confirm the location of seeded damages within the specimens and to quantify the size of the damages. Macro fiber composite sensors (MFCs) and piezoelectric sensors (PZTs) were used as actuators and sensors in pitch-catch and pulse-echo configurations in order to study mode conversions and wave reflections of the propagated Lamb waves when interacting with interply delaminations and foam-core separations. The final results indicated that the investigated NDE and SHM techniques are capable of detecting and quantifying damages within complex X-COR composites, with the SHM techniques having the potential to be used \textit{in situ} with a high degree of accuracy. It was also observed that the presence of the X-COR significantly alters the behavior of the wave when compared to a standard CFRP composite plate, making it necessary to account for any variations if wave-base techniques are to be used for damage detection and quantification. Lastly, a time-space model was created to model the wave interactions with damages located within X-COR complex sandwich composites.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Optimal Co-Design of Structure Topology and Sensor Deployment for Balanced System Performance and Observability

Description

As technology increases in capability, its purposes can become multifaceted, meaning it must accomplish multiple requirements as opposed to just one. An example of said technology could be high speed

As technology increases in capability, its purposes can become multifaceted, meaning it must accomplish multiple requirements as opposed to just one. An example of said technology could be high speed airplane wings, which must be strong enough to withstand high loads, light enough to enable the aircraft to fly, and have enough thermal conductivity to withstand high temperatures. Two objectives in particular, topology and sensor deployment, are important for designing structures such as robots which need accurate sensor readings, known as observability. In an attempt to display how these two dissimilar objectives coincide with each other, a project was created around the idea of finding an optimum balance of both. This supposed state would allow the structure not only to remain strong and light but also to be monitored via sensors with a high degree of accuracy. The main focus of the project was to compare levels of observability of two known factors of input estimation error. The first system involves a structure that has been topologically optimized for compliance minimization, which increases input estimation error. The second system produces structures with random placements of sensors within the structure, which, as the average distance from load to sensor increases, induces input estimation error. These two changes in observability were compared to see which had a more direct effect. The main findings were that changes in topology had a much more direct effect over levels of observability than changes in sensor placement. Results also show that theoretical input estimation time is significantly reduced when compared to previous systems.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Dimeric anthracene-based mechanophore particles for damage precursor detection in reinforced epoxy matrix composites

Description

The problem of catastrophic damage purveys in any material application, and minimizing its occurrence is paramount for general health and safety. We have successfully synthesized, characterized, and applied dimeric 9-anthracene

The problem of catastrophic damage purveys in any material application, and minimizing its occurrence is paramount for general health and safety. We have successfully synthesized, characterized, and applied dimeric 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (Di-AC)-based mechanophores particles to form stress sensing epoxy matrix composites. As Di-AC had never been previously applied as a mechanophore and thermosets are rarely studied in mechanochemistry, this created an alternative avenue for study in the field. Under an applied stress, the cyclooctane-rings in the Di-AC particles reverted back to their fluorescent anthracene form, which linearly enhanced the overall fluorescence of the composite in response to the applied strain. The fluorescent signal further allowed for stress sensing in the elastic region of the stress\u2014strain curve, which is considered to be a form of damage precursor detection. Overall, the incorporation of Di-AC to the epoxy matrix added much desired stress sensing and damage precursor detection capabilities with good retention of the material properties.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Pre-Symptomatic Detection of Lung Cancer Via Protein Biomarkers

Description

The purpose of this project was to examine the viability of protein biomarkers in pre-symptomatic detection of lung cancer. Regular screening has been shown to vastly improve patient survival outcome.

The purpose of this project was to examine the viability of protein biomarkers in pre-symptomatic detection of lung cancer. Regular screening has been shown to vastly improve patient survival outcome. Lung cancer currently has the highest occurrence and mortality of all cancers and so a means of screening would be highly beneficial. In this research, the biomarker neuron-specific enolase (Enolase-2, eno2), a marker of small-cell lung cancer, was detected at varying concentrations using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in order to develop a mathematical model of predicting protein expression based on a measured impedance value at a determined optimum frequency. The extent of protein expression would indicate the possibility of the patient having small-cell lung cancer. The optimum frequency was found to be 459 Hz, and the mathematical model to determine eno2 concentration based on impedance was found to be y = 40.246x + 719.5 with an R2 value of 0.82237. These results suggest that this approach could provide an option for the development of small-cell lung cancer screening utilizing electrochemical technology.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Electric Field Sensing of High Voltage Transmission Lines in Rural Areas

Description

This is a project to create an electric field sensing system which is fully portable. This system should provide accurate electric field readings from transmission lines allowing abstraction to find the voltage on the transmission line.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Algorithms for Tracking with a Foveal Sensor

Description

Foveal sensors employ a small region of high acuity (the foveal region) surrounded by a periphery of lesser acuity. Consequently, the output map that describes their sensory acuity is nonlinear,

Foveal sensors employ a small region of high acuity (the foveal region) surrounded by a periphery of lesser acuity. Consequently, the output map that describes their sensory acuity is nonlinear, rendering the vast corpus of linear system theory inapplicable immediately to the state estimation of a target being tracked by such a sensor. This thesis treats the adaptation of the Kalman filter, an iterative optimal estimator for linear-Gaussian dynamical systems, to enable its application to the nonlinear problem of foveal sensing. Results of simulations conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of this algorithm in tracking a target are presented, culminating in successful tracking for motion in two dimensions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Power management interface circuit for MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) bio-sensing and chemical sensing applications

Description

Power supply management is important for MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) bio-sensing and chemical sensing applications. The dissertation focuses on discussion of accessibility to different power sources and supply tuning in sensing applications.

Power supply management is important for MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) bio-sensing and chemical sensing applications. The dissertation focuses on discussion of accessibility to different power sources and supply tuning in sensing applications. First, the dissertation presents a high efficiency DC-DC converter for a miniaturized Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC). The miniaturized MFC produces up to approximately 10µW with an output voltage of 0.4-0.7V. Such a low voltage, which is also load dependent, prevents the MFC to directly drive low power electronics. A PFM (Pulse Frequency Modulation) type DC-DC converter in DCM (Discontinuous Conduction Mode) is developed to address the challenges and provides a load independent output voltage with high conversion efficiency. The DC-DC converter, implemented in UMC 0.18µm technology, has been thoroughly characterized, coupled with the MFC. At 0.9V output, the converter has a peak efficiency of 85% with 9µW load, highest efficiency over prior publication. Energy could be harvested wirelessly and often has profound impacts on system performance. The dissertation reports a side-by-side comparison of two wireless and passive sensing systems: inductive and electromagnetic (EM) couplings for an application of in-situ and real-time monitoring of wafer cleanliness in semiconductor facilities. The wireless system, containing the MEMS sensor works with battery-free operations. Two wireless systems based on inductive and EM couplings have been implemented. The working distance of the inductive coupling system is limited by signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) while that of the EM coupling is limited by the coupled power. The implemented on-wafer transponders achieve a working distance of 6 cm and 25 cm with a concentration resolution of less than 2% (4 ppb for a 200 ppb solution) for inductive and EM couplings, respectively. Finally, the supply tuning is presented in bio-sensing application to mitigate temperature sensitivity. The FBAR (film bulk acoustic resonator) based oscillator is an attractive method in label-free sensing application. Molecular interactions on FBAR surface induce mass change, which results in resonant frequency shift of FBAR. While FBAR has a high-Q to be sensitive to the molecular interactions, FBAR has finite temperature sensitivity. A temperature compensation technique is presented that improves the temperature coefficient of a 1.625 GHz FBAR-based oscillator from -118 ppm/K to less than 1 ppm/K by tuning the supply voltage of the oscillator. The tuning technique adds no additional component and has a large frequency tunability of -4305 ppm/V.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012