Matching Items (12)

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Reproductive Health Equity: One Key Question© for Women in Recovery

Description

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population.

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population. Equity-informed approaches promote the integration of reproductive health care (RHC) with recovery programs to improve both access to and quality of RHC. Arizona’s largest SUD recovery program, Crossroads, Inc. recently opened an on-site, integrated primary clinic offering RHC. A one-month pilot demonstration of One Key Question (OKQ), a pregnancy desire screening tool, was implemented with fidelity at Crossroads to identify clients with RHC needs and offer care.

IRB exempt status was obtained through Arizona State University. All female-bodied clients aged 18-49 were screened following routine admission assessments. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim model based on Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing was used to prioritize client autonomy. The client experience of care was measured using an adapted Interpersonal Quality of Family Planning scale. The magnitude of needs and desires were summarized with descriptive statistics. Sixty-three clients were screened with OKQ. Needs were identified in 97% of clients. Of those clients, 98% accepted referrals. Ninety percent of items measuring the client experience of care were rated as “excellent.” OKQ provided an efficient structure for person-centered screening and referral conversations to integrate RHC in a large SUD recovery program with excellent care experiences reported by clients.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-05

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Improving Confidence Levels in Wound Care Education: A Harm Reduction Strategy for People Who Inject Drugs

Description

People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for disease transmission and bacterial invasion of the blood and/or skin. PWID are a marginalized population who often delay medical treatment

People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for disease transmission and bacterial invasion of the blood and/or skin. PWID are a marginalized population who often delay medical treatment or substitute self-care treatment due to increased fear, barriers, or stigmatization in traditional healthcare settings. These delays often create multifaceted complications that eventually cost the healthcare system billions of dollars. This leads to poorer health outcomes in PWID. There is evidence that community-based interventions are effective in reaching this population of people in order to promote better health outcomes.

To address this gap in care, an evidenced based project centered on increasing the confidence levels of community lay workers when providing general wound education to PWID was conducted. The project was implemented at a rural harm reduction agency site in Northern Arizona. Utilizing the theoretical framework of the Adult Learning Theory, a convenience sample of 22 participants received a general wound education intervention consisting of a PowerPoint presentation with a written brochure over multiple sessions.

Adapted questions from the new general self-efficacy (NGSE) scale, which has demonstrated valid internal consistency, were utilized to measure confidence levels of participants and a scored checklist was used to measure teaching performance. Confidence levels significantly increased from baseline to week four (p = .001). Teach-back performance scores also increased from baseline to week two and four. Providing a general wound education intervention to community lay workers improved confidence levels and teaching performance which can promote better health outcomes in PWID.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-30

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Determining Medical-Surgical Nurses' Perceptions of Alcohol-Abusing Patients

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine perceptions of medical-surgical nurses of alcohol-abusing patients admitted to an acute care facility Background: Studies report that many nurses have negative

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine perceptions of medical-surgical nurses of alcohol-abusing patients admitted to an acute care facility Background: Studies report that many nurses have negative feelings about substance-abusing patients (Neville & Roan, 2014). It has been found nurses report a lack of knowledge about substance abuse disorders, as well as a view that substance abusing patients are more emotionally challenging and dangerous, often leading to decreased motivation and lower levels of job satisfaction (van Boekel, Brouwers, van Weeghel & Garrestsen, 2013). However, studies have found that additional education can positively impact nurses' perceptions (Arthur, 2001). Methods/Approach: This study is a descriptive design using a 17-question 2-part survey. The first part of the survey includes seven demographic questions pertaining to the participants' characteristics and experiences. The second part of the survey is adapted from the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ), a valid and reliable instrument used to assess healthcare providers' attitudes toward working with alcohol-abusing patients. Results: Eighty four medical-surgical nurses participated in the study. Over half reported having four hours or less of continuing education on alcohol abuse disorder. Regression analyses identified positive relationships between factors, particularly continuing education, on perceptions of alcohol-abusing patients. Conclusions/Implications: Results of this study can be used to determine what factors contribute to nurses' perceptions of alcohol-abusing patients in the medical-surgical unit, therefore aiding in identifying and developing effective policies, protocols, and interventions aimed at improving quality of patient care in this specific patient population.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Homelessness and Mental Illness: The Relationship Between These Two Factors, and Effective Service Model Solutions

Description

The purpose of this research study was to examine the intersection of the relationship between homelessness and mental illness, including other factors such as substance abuse. A secondary purpose of

The purpose of this research study was to examine the intersection of the relationship between homelessness and mental illness, including other factors such as substance abuse. A secondary purpose of this study was to gain an awareness of service delivery models and associated funding streams for providing services to homeless persons with mental illness. A thorough literature review was conducted by the author in order to aid in answering these questions. The author also conducted interviews with 27 homeless and formerly homeless clients living in Denver who were receiving services through the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless. Finally, the author conducted 4 qualitative interviews with policy experts who worked extensively in homeless services and advocacy in the Metro-Denver area. All data was entered into an Excel workbook, and a series of graphs and tables were made to present the research results. The themes of mental illness and substance abuse were common amongst the sample population, but the most common theme was that of the lack of affordable housing available. The majority of respondents also cited involvement in the criminal justice system such as incarceration, as well as family issues as major factors in them becoming homeless. The policy experts all cited the Housing First as well as the Permanent Supportive Housing model as the most effective service delivery model for those who are both homeless and mentally-ill, and Denver is utilizing some very innovative funding streams for these service delivery models. In conclusion, the author found through both the literature review and quantitative research, that homelessness is not truly a mental illness or substance abuse issue alone, though this relationship does hold clinical importance. Homelessness is instead the result of an excessive shortage of permanent and affordable housing units across the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

Users and Abusers: Self-Identification of Substance (Ab)use Among Incarcerated Men

Description

The purpose of this project was to explore whether perceptual differences exist between meth, marijuana, and alcohol users who acknowledge that they have a substance abuse problem and those who

The purpose of this project was to explore whether perceptual differences exist between meth, marijuana, and alcohol users who acknowledge that they have a substance abuse problem and those who do not acknowledge that they have a substance abuse problem. Additionally, this project was taken a step further to analyze whether these differences changed as harder drug users were progressively phased out of the sample. The data for this project were obtained from a larger study conducted through ASU. The larger study collected questionnaire data from over 400 incarcerated men at the Arizona State Prison Complex in Florence. Two samples were created to assess differences between users who acknowledge that they have a substance abuse problem and those who do not. The purpose of the first sample was to explore whether differences exist between meth, marijuana, and alcohol users when “hard” drug users are progressively eliminated from the sample. The purpose of the second sample was to get a more comprehensive look at all individuals who marked that they used either meth, marijuana, or alcohol. The data showed that there are no apparent differences between meth, marijuana, and alcohol users who acknowledge that they have a substance abuse problem, but that there may be differences between those who do not acknowledge a substance abuse problem.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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BoJack and Mental Illness

Description

A look at how mental illness has played a role in BoJack horseman and made us think differently about what it means for mental illness to be in animated shows.

A look at how mental illness has played a role in BoJack horseman and made us think differently about what it means for mental illness to be in animated shows. As well, this website uses comparative statics to showcase what BoJack does differently.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Brave Bears Project: Using Transitional Objects for Children Experiencing Trauma

Description

Brave Bears was a Barrett creative project that operated under local non-profit organizations, Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels and Arizona Women’s Recovery Center. Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels provides support and education

Brave Bears was a Barrett creative project that operated under local non-profit organizations, Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels and Arizona Women’s Recovery Center. Amanda Hope Rainbow Angels provides support and education for children fighting cancer and their families. Arizona Women’s Recovery Center provides rehabilitation programs for women fighting substance abuse and housing for the women and their children. The Brave Bears Project was focused on helping children in these situations cope with the trauma they are experiencing. The children received a teddy bear, which is a transitional object. In addition, a clay pendant with the word, “brave” pressed into it was tied around the bear’s neck with a ribbon. A poem of explanation and encouragement was also included.<br/><br/>The teddy bear provided comfort to children experiencing emotionally distressing situations as they receive treatment for their illness or as their mom undergoes rehabilitation. This can be in the form of holding the teddy bear when they feel frightened, anxious, lonely or depressed. The “brave” pendant and poem seek to encourage them and acknowledge their trauma and ability to persevere.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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"I Wasn't the Mother I Should Have Been": Motherhood, Fatherhood, and Substance Abuse in the Context of Intimate Partner Violence

Description

Mothers have a unique experience of domestic violence and help-seeking because of their dual identity as mothers and survivors. Based on a qualitative analysis of 7 interviews I conducted with

Mothers have a unique experience of domestic violence and help-seeking because of their dual identity as mothers and survivors. Based on a qualitative analysis of 7 interviews I conducted with mothers in shelter, I explore how survivors understand themselves as mothers, their partners as fathers, and the role of substance abuse in their relationships. My research suggests improved policies for service providers, including allowing mothers to maintain custody of their kids while in rehab.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Self-control and the consequences of maladaptive coping: specifying a new pathway between victimization and offending

Description

The link between victimization and offending is well established in the literature, yet an unexplored causal pathway within this relationship is concerned with why some individuals engage in maladaptive coping

The link between victimization and offending is well established in the literature, yet an unexplored causal pathway within this relationship is concerned with why some individuals engage in maladaptive coping in response to victimization. In particular, those with low self-control may be attracted to problematic yet immediately gratifying forms of coping post-victimization (e.g., substance use), which may increase their likelihood of violent offending in the future. Using three waves of adolescent panel data from the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) program, this research examines: (1) whether individuals with low-self control are more likely to engage in substance use coping following violent victimization, and (2) whether victims with low self-control who engage in substance use coping are more likely to commit violent offenses in the future. The results from negative binomial regressions support these hypotheses, even after controlling for prior offending, peer influences, prior substance abuse, and other forms of offending. The implications for integrating general strain and self-control theories, as well as for our understanding of the victimization-offending overlap, are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Heroin use and recidivism: the impact of familial social support

Description

There has been a rise in heroin use throughout the United States due to doctors increasingly prescribing painkillers to patients with chronic pain (Kanouse & Compton, 2015; Compton, Boyle, &

There has been a rise in heroin use throughout the United States due to doctors increasingly prescribing painkillers to patients with chronic pain (Kanouse & Compton, 2015; Compton, Boyle, & Wargo, 2015). Individuals get addicted to painkillers and, when their doctor will no longer prescribe them, turn to alternative methods of relief; heroin is often their cheapest option (Kolodny, Courtwright, Hwang, Kreiner, Eadie, Clark, & Alexander 2015). Heroin users are three to four times more likely to die from overdose than other types of drug users (Darke & Hall, 2003). The purpose of this study is to determine the likelihood that heroin users successfully reenter the community upon release from prison in comparison to other types of drug users. There are several re-entry outcomes that can be considered “success”; this study measures success as an index of the quality of the returning offender’s familial relationships as well as recidivism. The data used for this analysis is the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI). The sample consists of male offenders, aged 18 years and older, who have been convicted of and imprisoned for a serious or violent crime. Findings suggest familial social support does not have an effect on heroin use, but heroin use increases the risk of recidivism. These findings will provide a context for rehabilitation of heroin offenders and will launch future research focusing on the differences between heroin users and other types of drug users.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016