Matching Items (133)

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A Child's Ability to Learn Emotion Understanding and Coping Strategies

Description

Self-regulation in the form of coping with emotions is something that most people have effectively adapted to by adulthood. This is an organically learned process that begins in early childhood

Self-regulation in the form of coping with emotions is something that most people have effectively adapted to by adulthood. This is an organically learned process that begins in early childhood through play, parenting, education, and peer interactions. This study examines whether six children aged 4-5 (M age= 4.72, SD= 0.372, 50% female, 100% Caucasian) are able to understand basic emotions and how to cope with them through one of two protocols. The conditions were either directive instruction or embodied cognition, and children were evaluated with a pre and post-test measure. Findings did not indicate any significant effect of the conditions on memorizing coping mechanisms, nor did it indicate that there was a significant improvement in emotion understanding following the sessions. These findings were limited by the sample size and participant interest.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Not Having Your Meat and Eating It Too

Description

This thesis argues that our current attitudes toward meat consumption should be questioned for multiple reasons: because eating meat is cruel to the animals being eaten, it is detrimental to

This thesis argues that our current attitudes toward meat consumption should be questioned for multiple reasons: because eating meat is cruel to the animals being eaten, it is detrimental to the environment, it is not at all necessary for a balanced diet, and lastly because the amount of faux meat options are endless. To begin the thesis describes the types of meat filled food that surrounds all of us, as Americans, in our everyday lives. It then meditates on the history of these other non-meat choices, in order to show how important faux meat has been throughout time for various cultures and religions. The work then continues from the past to the present, and profiles the growing availability and abundance of faux meat products in North American culture. In doing this it presents the current vegetarian meat options available to the average American consumer. In hopes of convince consumers that choosing ethically doesn't have to mean choosing blandly, it presents reviews of the taste, texture, and physical appearance of the more popular faux meat products on the market today. After which it turns to the future and commends technological and scientific endeavors in the search for a new cruelty free meat source through in-vitro meat research. And finally this thesis explains the disastrous environmental impact of our current meat filled diets. It concludes that the strong westerner tradition of eating meat is not necessarily the right way to eat. By purchasing and eating meat the consumer is voting, with their dollar, for animal abuse and environmental destruction. The consequences of eating meat are atrocious enough that if people are given a more ethical, delicious, and cheap meat-alternative they will chose it.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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A Political Critique of the Objectification of Science and Religion

Description

This essay explores the role of religion, science, and the secular in contemporary society by showing their connection to social and political legitimacy as a result of historical processes. In

This essay explores the role of religion, science, and the secular in contemporary society by showing their connection to social and political legitimacy as a result of historical processes. In Chapter One, the essay presents historical arguments, particularly linguistic, which confirm science and religion as historically created categories without timeless or essential differences. Additionally, the current institutional separation of science and religion was politically motivated by the changing power structures following the Protestant Reformation. In Chapter Two, the essay employs the concept of the modern social imaginary to show how our modern concept of the political and the secular subtly reproduce the objectified territories of science and religion and thus the boundary maintenance dialectic which dominates science-religion discourse. Chapter Three argues that ‘religious’ worldviews contain genuine metaphysical claims which do not recognizably fit into these modern social categories. Given the destabilizing forces of globalization and information technology upon the political authority of the nation-state, the way many conceptualize of these objects religion, science, and the secular will change as well.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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From Alpha to Omega: the Creation and Negotiation of a Fan Genre

Description

While the concept of literary genres has much discussion about them, very little work has been done to address how genres emerge and grow into the cultural shorthand we know

While the concept of literary genres has much discussion about them, very little work has been done to address how genres emerge and grow into the cultural shorthand we know them by today. In this paper I seek to explore one specific genre of fanfiction, Omegaverse, what the genre looks like, what permutations it has undergone in the short time it has existed as a standalone genre, how the fan communities that write and read the genre have shaped it, and what this means for genre creation overall. Started less than a decade ago in the form it is recognized as today, the alternate universe setting focuses on a different human biological hierarchy based on adapted physiology of wolves, which recognizes people in three biologically inherent roles, alphas, betas, or omegas. It was created by the Supernatural fandom in one of their LiveJournal forums, and has since been since co-opted by many other fandoms. Being a relatively new genre, very little research has been done on it, despite having over 20 thousand fanfictions tagged as “Alpha/Beta/Omega Dynamics” on Archive of Our Own alone. However, there is significant overlap between this genre and the wider genres of slash and Mpreg, so I will be incorporating research and conclusions drawn from paper on those topics, such as Åström’s “Male Pregnancy in Supernatural fan fiction” (2010) and Joanna Russ’ “Pornography by Women for Women, With Love” (2014), as well as broad literary genre research and discussions, including Jason Mittell’s "A Cultural Approach to Television Genre Theory" (2001) and Dudley Andrew’s Concepts in Film Theory (1984).

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Facebook in Fifth Grade? Implications of Social Media on Today's Youth

Description

This study derives from a developmental psychology viewpoint. The main research question is, "What are the effects of social media on children?" Aspects such as bullying, personality changes, and academic

This study derives from a developmental psychology viewpoint. The main research question is, "What are the effects of social media on children?" Aspects such as bullying, personality changes, and academic performances are considered. This topic is important because it has yet to be explored extensively. Given the ever changing nature of social media, it is a challenge to keep up with research on how this technology is changing the direction of society. Studying children involved with social media allows a direct glimpse into what one aspect of the future of child social development holds. The main problem explored in this thesis is whether or not social media is currently affecting children negatively. Correlations will be examined to determine who is most likely to utilize social media, as well as who is most likely to be affected positively or negatively by networking sites. Motivations behind social media usage and time spent online will also be studied. This research is important in understanding today's youth, and once understood, parents and teachers can learn to guide children in using social media for beneficial reasons rather than potentially detrimental ones. I have conducted my research by means of a survey, one in which the entire fifth-grade class at Copper Creek Elementary School partook. Results showed that nearly all surveyed students used social media. Differences in social media usage between classmates based on gender and presence of older siblings were found. It was concluded that social media is affecting fifth-grade females more negatively than fifth-grade males. Also, it was found that children with older siblings may be at risk for using mature social media sites too soon. The long term effects of these findings were not explored, and further research on this subject is encouraged.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Cultural Value of Bad Storytelling

Description

An investigation into the cultural phenomenon surrounding books and movies that are considered critical failures, but are nonetheless championed in popular culture. Stories are an essential part of American culture,

An investigation into the cultural phenomenon surrounding books and movies that are considered critical failures, but are nonetheless championed in popular culture. Stories are an essential part of American culture, and many people not only tolerate but truly enjoy those stories that are shocking, confusing, and, in some cases, those that were created by storytellers with almost no talent at all. The continued production of these lackluster stories was considered, with an eye to the corporate influences on film studios and publishers. This paper also looked at two storytellers, the filmmaker Ed Wood and the author Stephen King, whose value as artists has been debated by passionate fans and their strongest critics. The sociological concepts of taste and cultural capital, as defined by sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, and the art movements of postmodernism and metamodernism, particularly the style of camp as defined by Susan Sontag and the value of bad taste in art as defined by John Waters, were investigated in regards to their connection to the popularity of bad films and novels. A brief investigation into the psychological effects of consuming bad stories, especially in children, was also included. From this foundation of the bad story as an important part of our culture's ideas about art and its consumption, the paper then addresses some of the popular methods of consumption of the bad story. For novels, the paper examines the trend of pulp fiction novels and of romance novels, going into depth on the role of E.L James' Fifty Shades of Grey in popular culture. For film, the paper examines the impact of the midnight movie trend on the popularity of subversive, counter-culture films, the role of camp genre films like Sharman's The Rocky Horror Picture Show in our culture, particularly with an eye towards audience participation screenings, and the way in which other projects, like Joel Hodgson's Mystery Science Theater 3000, transform bad films into new, enjoyable entertainment. Overall, this paper investigates all of the positive aspects around a failed story that allow these missteps in writing and directing to still find success in our culture.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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A Losing Battle: Investigating Keys for Success for Music in Movements, and What’s Ahead

Description

I will demonstrate through analysis that the effectiveness of music in social movements relies in large part on two unique elements: authenticity and collective action. I will then argue that

I will demonstrate through analysis that the effectiveness of music in social movements relies in large part on two unique elements: authenticity and collective action. I will then argue that these elements are antithetic to the actual conditions of music production as the 21st century progresses in America. While this paper does not explore the possible effectiveness of movements without music, I emphasize the well documented ((Futrell, et. al. (2006), (Roy, 2010), (Dyck, 2017)) link between music and social movements, and conclude that this relationship between music and social movements is in danger.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Bow to the Queen: A Study of Perceived Classism and Communication in Renaissance Faire Subculture

Description

"Bow to the Queen" is an investigation of the presence of classism within the American renaissance faire subculture and the way it impacts communication between community members. While "rennie" subculture

"Bow to the Queen" is an investigation of the presence of classism within the American renaissance faire subculture and the way it impacts communication between community members. While "rennie" subculture has been the subject of many ethnographies in the past, this thesis uses quantitative data to first identify the state of classism and then analyze any effects or correlations it maintains with communication. The literature review shows that unlike past studies, "Bow to the Queen" does not compare members of the renaissance faire community to outsiders, but rather defines the complex social structure and uses it to compare different subgroups of "rennies" to each other. After composing and releasing a survey designed to discreetly measure community members' communication patterns and attitudes toward fellow participants, 100 surveys were collected from current renaissance faire employees from 29 different festivals around the United States. Questions primarily inquired about the relationships between members of the community who stay local to one festival versus those who travel the festival circuit full-time. While results did not prove a definitive nor direct relationship between the presence of classism and increased or decreased communication, they did show that the prevalence of prejudice between social echelons is a far more nuanced construct than was first considered. Ultimately, the significance of this study comes down to the way it demonstrates a fair and thorough treatment of fringe subcultures that are often looked at superficially by the academic community, and by doing so help prevent the pathologization of such cultures in the future.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

The Pathfinder Center Stories Project: Narratives from Student Experiences in College

Description

This paper considers what factors influence student interest, motivation, and continued engagement. Studies show anticipated extrinsic rewards for activity participation have been shown to reduce intrinsic value for that activity.

This paper considers what factors influence student interest, motivation, and continued engagement. Studies show anticipated extrinsic rewards for activity participation have been shown to reduce intrinsic value for that activity. This might suggest that grade point average (GPA) has a similar effect on academic interests. Further, when incentives such as scholarships, internships, and careers are GPA-oriented, students must adopt performance goals in courses to guarantee success. However, performance goals have not been shown to correlated with continued interest in a topic. Current literature proposes that student involvement in extracurricular activities, focused study groups, and mentored research are crucial to student success. Further, students may express either a fixed or growth mindset, which influences their approach to challenges and opportunities for growth. The purpose of this study was to collect individual cases of students' experiences in college. The interview method was chosen to collect complex information that could not be gathered from standard surveys. To accomplish this, questions were developed based on content areas related to education and motivation theory. The content areas included activities and meaning, motivation, vision, and personal development. The developed interview method relied on broad questions that would be followed by specific "probing" questions. We hypothesize that this would result in participant-led discussions and unique narratives from the participant. Initial findings suggest that some of the questions were effective in eliciting detailed responses, though results were dependent on the interviewer. From the interviews we find that students value their group involvements, leadership opportunities, and relationships with mentors, which parallels results found in other studies.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Mapping the newly menstruating body: Qualitative analysis of teachers' experiences with menstruation education and ""hygiene"" curriculum in elementary schools

Description

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference within school sanctioned curricula. A closer examination of this pedagogical moment from the perspective of educators helps us to understand the dissemination of the shame narrative present in menstrual socialization. Six teachers were interviewed about their experiences with administering the menstrual health curriculum in elementary schools across a large southwest metropolitan area. A discourse analysis of these interviews was completed in order to find themes of language used surrounding menstrual health curriculum. Themes of shame, legislative restrictions on sex education curriculum and personal narratives surrounding menstruation are discussed in addition to the current neo-liberal structure of public health curriculum. Future research into alternative modes of education on menstruation is proposed.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05