Matching Items (167)

A Guide to Coaching Color Guard

Description

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within the thesis project “A Guide to Coaching Color Guard” there

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within the thesis project “A Guide to Coaching Color Guard” there are four sub-components.

The first is a historical research paper titled “The History and Evolution of Color Guard within Marching Band”. This paper defines what color guard is, identifies its origins, and outlines the major events that contributed to its development over time, leading up to what the sport and art of color guard has evolved into today.

The second component is a paper titled “Coaching Color Guard: My Experiences with Planning, Teaching, and Building a High School Color Guard Program”, which is a summarization of how a season of coaching color guard can be organized and examples of various learning opportunities a color guard coach could take advantage of during a season. Many education-specific teaching strategies are explained, such as the use of modeling, I do - we do - you do, whole-part-whole, scaffolding, sequencing from simple to complex, direct instruction vs. small groups, teaching to various learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), instructor/peer/group feedback, assessment, and opportunities for student contribution and creativity.

The third component is paper titled “Color Guard Coaching Resources”, which is made up of ten different documents that are examples or resources for color guard instructors. These resources are referenced in the second component of this project and include samples of flyers, audition scoring sheets, a student handbook, participation sheet, and written choreography as well as providing a list of other outside resources as well as a list of the video tutorials.

These video tutorials are the final component of this project. There are 44 tutorial videos broken up into five categories. Each video is a step-by-step teaching video demonstrating and articulating how to spin a color guard flag. The first category consists of 10 introductory videos, which discuss terms and concepts that are overarching in all of the tutorial videos. Then, there are 23 tutorials within the category titled ‘Basic Moves’. The next category of ‘Intermediate Moves’ consists of 5 teaching videos for moves that are more difficult to execute than the basic moves. The fourth category has 5 video tutorials for ‘Tosses’. The last category is called ‘Move Sequences’ and only has 1 video. This tutorial shows how some moves have similar rotation patterns and can easily be strung together to create a choreography sequence.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Inclusive Band: Music Learning for Students with Special Needs

Description

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the start until Spring 2019 when there was a shift in membership. This caused the Peer Mentors to have to move to new groups. Some moved to a Music Student that played the same instrument while others were because a member graduated or left Inclusive Band and were replaced by new members. This transition was hard for both Peer Mentors and Music Students. The Music Students were used to their Peer Mentors and built a strong friendship with them. Losing them was hard and some still struggle with it several months later. The Peer Mentors also had difficulties adjusting to teaching a different Music Student. They did not know their strengths and weaknesses or the best way to teach them. This challenge led to the creation of the handbook, which is a guide for future members of Inclusive Band to aid with the transition from semester to semester.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Relationships Between Musical Preferences of College-Age People and Level of Musical Education/Other Biographical Factors

Description

This project examines the relationship between individuals' musical preferences and the amount of musical education they have received, as well as some other supporting variables. Data was collected from 43 participants regarding general and musical background information. Participants then listened

This project examines the relationship between individuals' musical preferences and the amount of musical education they have received, as well as some other supporting variables. Data was collected from 43 participants regarding general and musical background information. Participants then listened to eight musical samples and answered a series of related questions. These sets of data were compared to investigate how musical preference varies with changes in background information, principally the level of musical education received. Musical preference was gauged in part according to a system which relied more on discrete musical features than common genre categorizations. The population studied was made up of honors students from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University. The research questions addressed are: is musical preference dependent on level of musical education; if so, how; and what are some possible explanations for any relationships? This study was conducted in order to obtain a clearer understanding of the nature of musical preference which may be of use to musicologists and modern musicians alike. Results indicated that musical education does have an effect on musical preferences and listening habits, but that this effect is not correlated in any straightforward relationship, and there are likely more diverse issues at play.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Marching Madness: A Comparative Study of Instructional Practices in the Marching Arts

Description

The activities of drum corps and high school marching band are similar in many ways, and yet drum corps is styled as the "major league" of the marching arts. What makes the learning environment different between drum corps and high

The activities of drum corps and high school marching band are similar in many ways, and yet drum corps is styled as the "major league" of the marching arts. What makes the learning environment different between drum corps and high school marching band? While drum corps has a denser rehearsal schedule, and involved an audition process where high school marching band does not, the biggest difference between the two activities lies in the instructional practices utilized. Drum corps does not have to adhere to state or national arts education standards, and so the instructors must create their own standards and forms of assessment for the students, which directly affects student motivation. This student motivation can be understood through the Self-Determination Theory pioneered by Deci & Ryan, in which the conditions of autonomy, competency, and relatedness must be supported for students to reach the highest levels of motivation. By interviewing the directors of the Academy Drum and Bugle Corps, and the Casa Grande Union High School marching band, and surveying students of each organization, a comparison can be made in the instructional practices of each organization and the subsequent effect on student motivation. Through the interviews with the directors, it was gathered that instructors in drum corps had more chances to work with the students one on one, and assess their personal growth in a subjective manner than the instructors in the high school marching band. This affected the way in which the drum corps instructors structured their rehearsals and set their goals. High school instructors were able to assess technical skill more often with graded assessments such as playing tests or scale checks, though this did not always take into account the students' personal growth or experience. From the anonymous surveys of the students of both organizations, a desire for relatedness was communicated from the high school students more than the drum corps students, and a greater lack of comfort with asking questions was displayed from the high school students. Interpreting these results with SDT, it could be said that these high school students were feeling less motivated than the drum corps students due to a lack of fulfillment in the areas of relatedness and competence. In the end, it would seem that the differentiated instruction that is possible in drum corps sets the activity apart from high school marching band, as the instructors are able to work with students on setting personal goals and may subjectively assess their growth within the activity. Self- and peer-evaluation in drum corps is also facilitated through video assignments in which other students may give comments to their peers, which builds the area of relatedness more within drum corps students than in high school students.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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E-Strings Academy: An Interactive Online Resource Center for the 21st Century String Musician

Description

E-Strings Academy (www.estringsacademy.wordpress.com) is a resource website intended for the beginning violinist, violist, cellist, and bassist. The mission of the website is to extend musical learning opportunities to students outside of the physical string classroom and to engage first-year

E-Strings Academy (www.estringsacademy.wordpress.com) is a resource website intended for the beginning violinist, violist, cellist, and bassist. The mission of the website is to extend musical learning opportunities to students outside of the physical string classroom and to engage first-year string students in musical activities at home that supplement the instruction they receive in a school setting. The current website features five different areas for students to explore: lesson videos, tunes, listening activities, games, and resources. In each area, students have the opportunity to learn and reinforce musical concepts and skill sets that they will need in order to be successful in music, both in their first year of playing and beyond. I created E-Strings Academy with the intention that I use it with my own string students in my future teaching career. It is a flexible website that I will continue to revise, adapt, and enhance to best serve the needs of my students and enrich their musical learning outside of the classroom.

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Date Created
2015-05

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The Role of North American Music Educators in the Introduction of the Kodaly Method in Taiwan

Description

During the 1970s and 1980s, as Taiwan was undergoing profound economic, cultural and political change, a group of North American music educators collaborated with Taiwanese colleagues to establish the Kodaly Method in Taiwan. A history of this pioneering effort is presented.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-10

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Standardization of the Gordon Primary Measures of Music Audiation in Greece

Description

The purpose of this study was to standardize the Primary Measures of Music Audiation in Greece (N = 1,188). Split-halves reliability was acceptable across grade levels (K through 3) for the Tonal and Rhythm subtests, but test-retest reliability was generally

The purpose of this study was to standardize the Primary Measures of Music Audiation in Greece (N = 1,188). Split-halves reliability was acceptable across grade levels (K through 3) for the Tonal and Rhythm subtests, but test-retest reliability was generally unacceptable, especially for the Rhythm subtest. Concurrent validity was mixed, with teacher ratings of musical achievement generally significantly correlated with Tonal but not Rhythm subtest scores. Composite test means were significantly higher for suburban and urban samples than for rural samples and were significantly higher for higher grade levels. Item difficulty coefficients were significantly correlated across grade levels. The Greek and U.S. composite means were similar except for a significantly higher U.S. mean for grade 1. However, when the rural subgroup was removed from the Greek sample to equate with the U.S. norming sample, there were nonsignificant differences from grades K through 1, but significant differences in favor of the Greek sample for grades 3 and 4.

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Created

Date Created
2010-04

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Classroom Observation Ability Among Pre-Service Music Educators in Greece

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom observation ability of pre-service music teachers in Greece (N = 62). Two groups of undergraduates, one near the beginning and one near the end of a two-year course sequence in

The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom observation ability of pre-service music teachers in Greece (N = 62). Two groups of undergraduates, one near the beginning and one near the end of a two-year course sequence in teaching methods that included in-class and in-school training in observation ("juniors" and "seniors," respectively), observed videotapes of one elementary (4th grade) and one secondary (8th grade) general music class, each being taught by its own expert music teacher. Subjects wrote comments that judges classified into subcategories within overall categories of lesson, teacher, and students. Results largely confirmed those of previous research from the USA, with the more experienced subjects making significantly more comments and both groups focusing more on teachers than on lessons or students. There were also differences between subcategories and significant intersections involving experience level and sex of the subjects.

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Created

Date Created
2010-02