Matching Items (4)

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Exploring the Development of Writing Abilities and Writing Confidence in RN-BSN Students

Description

The purpose of the study was to explore students' writing abilities throughout the online RN-BSN program at a large urban university in the Southwest. The aims of the study were:

The purpose of the study was to explore students' writing abilities throughout the online RN-BSN program at a large urban university in the Southwest. The aims of the study were: 1) explore how students' writing abilities, confidence in writing, and ability to locate resources change throughout the online RN-BSN program, 2) identify which aspects of writing students consider to be their strengths and/or challenges, and 3) explore which factors predict how well students write, their confidence in writing, and their ability to locate resources. After obtaining IRB approval, an invitation to participate in the study was sent to students enrolled in four different courses within the RN-BSN program. Students who chose to participate completed a 16-item questionnaire in which they rated their writing abilities, confidences, and skills, indicated strengths and challenges in their writing, and skills in locating evidence-based resources. An improvement was noted in students' self-rated academic writing confidence, professional writing confidence, internet reference skills, and library reference skills. The number of years as a registered nurse predicted overall writing ability and academic writing confidence.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Using a Longitudinal Case Study to Teach Warfarin Concepts to Prelicensure and Postbaccalaureate Nursing Students: A Peer Evaluation

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a peer nursing student who presents a longitudinal case study on warfarin in a pharmacology course classroom influences prelicensure and postbaccalaureate

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a peer nursing student who presents a longitudinal case study on warfarin in a pharmacology course classroom influences prelicensure and postbaccalaureate nursing students' knowledge and perceived knowledge about warfarin. The study was a descriptive design that used a convenience sample of baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in two pharmacology courses. All participating students answered warfarin case-study questions and completed a self-demographic questionnaire, a knowledge pretest and posttest, and a self-efficacy questionnaire after the activity, which evaluated students' knowledge and perceived knowledge on 11 warfarin concepts. For all students (N = 89), the number of correct answers improved significantly between pretests and posttests for Items 2-11 (p < .0001; Wilcoxon signed-rank tests), which evaluated students' knowledge on warfarin's site of action, associated laboratory values, use of vitamin K, and food-drug interactions. However, no significant difference was seen in the number of correct answers for warfarin's mechanism of action. Comparing prelicensure and postbaccalaureate groups by Mann-Whitney tests, no significant difference was seen for pretest total scores (median 7.00, n = 55; median 7.50, n = 34; respectively; p = .399). Similarly, no difference was seen for posttest total scores by groups (prelicensure: median = 9.00, n =54; postbaccalaureate: median = 10.00, n = 32; p = .344). Overall, students in both groups agreed that they could identify and explain all 11 warfarin concepts. The Pearson correlation between the total posttest and total self-efficacy scores for the combined group was .338 (p = .003), demonstrating a low but significant correlation between students' posttest total scores and their perceived warfarin knowledge, as evaluated by the self-efficacy questionnaire.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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“An Indescribable Experience: ” Nursing Students Studying and Serving Abroad

Description

“Study abroad” is a common term among college students. According to Open Doors annual report as published by the Institute of International Education (2019), one in ten students seeking a

“Study abroad” is a common term among college students. According to Open Doors annual report as published by the Institute of International Education (2019), one in ten students seeking a bachelor’s or associate’s degree will study abroad before they graduate. Additionally, 16% of students earning a bachelor’s degree in the United States (US) will study abroad in their undergraduate years. Students in major fields of study, such as business and social sciences, are most likely to study abroad. However, only 6.9% of health professions majors studied abroad in the 2017-2018 academic year (Institute of International Education, 2019). This study provides insight into how a study abroad program in Peru impacts nursing students’ perceptions and attitudes of intercultural interactions, which are fundamental in expanding and developing cultural competency. This study also demonstrates how the abroad experience with service learning could affect nursing practice.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Student retention in higher education: examining the patterns of selection, preparation, retention, and graduation of nursing students in the undergraduate pre-licensure nursing program at Arizona State University

Description

This study is designed to understand the patterns of selection, preparation, retention and graduation of undergraduate pre-licensure clinical nursing students in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona

This study is designed to understand the patterns of selection, preparation, retention and graduation of undergraduate pre-licensure clinical nursing students in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University enrolled in 2007 and 2008. The resulting patterns may guide policy decision making regarding future cohorts in this program. Several independent variables were examined including grades earned in prerequisite courses; replacement course frequency; scores earned on the Nurse Entrance Test (NET); the number of prerequisite courses taken at four-year institutions; race/ethnicity; and gender. The dependent variable and definition of success is completion of the Traditional Pre-licensure Clinical Nursing Program in the prescribed four terms. Theories of retention and success in nursing programs at colleges and universities guide the research. Correlational analysis and multiple logistic regression revealed that specific prerequisite courses--Human Nutrition, Clinical Healthcare Ethics, and Human Pathophysiology--as well as race/ethnicity, and gender are predictive of completing this program in the prescribed four terms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012