Matching Items (3)

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Motivational Factors Influencing High School Students' Persistence to STEM Majors in their First Year of College

Description

This research was intended to investigate the effects of various motivational variables on high school students' declaration of a STEM major in college, focusing on PSEM majors. It made use of data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009,

This research was intended to investigate the effects of various motivational variables on high school students' declaration of a STEM major in college, focusing on PSEM majors. It made use of data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009, including the first and second follow-up years (2011 and 2013). The advantage of this study over others is due to this data set, which was designed to be a representative sample of the national population of US high school students. Effects of motivational factors were considered in the context of demographic groups, with the analysis conducted on PSEM declaration illuminating a problem in the discrepancy between male and female high school students. In general, however, PSEM retention from intention to declaration is abysmal, with only 35% of those students who intended towards PSEM actually enrolling.

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Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Assisted Cycling Therapy Improves Self-Efficacy in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty-nine participants were randomly divided into a voluntary cycling group (VC) (i.e., self-selected cadence), an assisted cycling group (ACT) (i.e., at

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty-nine participants were randomly divided into a voluntary cycling group (VC) (i.e., self-selected cadence), an assisted cycling group (ACT) (i.e., at least 30% faster than self-selected cadence accomplished by a motor), or a no exercise group (NC). In each cycling intervention the participant completed 30 minute cycling sessions, three times per week for a total of eight weeks. Two subsets of the Physical Activity and Self Efficacy Survey were administered prior to cycling (i.e., pretest) and after the eight week intervention (i.e., post-test). The results were consistent with the hypothesis that self-efficacy would improve after ACT, however there was not improvement after the VC condition as hypothesized. It was also hypothesized that exercise perception would improve following the ACT intervention; execise perception showed a trend of improvement after ACT, but the data did not reach significance. Limitations include the wide variability of the DS population. This limitation is responsible for the variation in mental age seen in the intervention groups and could be responsible for the non-significance of the exercise perception data. To generalize our results for parents, therapists, teachers, etc., our recommendation is for persons with DS to participate in physical activity that is easy for them at first \u2014 a simplified sport or active game, assisted cycling, brisk walking \u2014 so that they have a positive experience with exercise. Showing individuals with DS that they can be proficient exercisers will likely improve their self-efficacy and motivate them to engage in more PA over time. In conclusion, eight weeks of moderate ACT exercise demonstrated a significant trend for improved self-efficacy in adolescents with DS.

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Created

Date Created
2015-12

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Measuring the Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Mindset in ASU Freshman Engineering Students

Description

This study investigated how mindset intervention in freshman engineering courses influenced students’ implicit intelligence and self-efficacy beliefs. An intervention which bolsters students’ beliefs that they possess the cognitive tools to perform well in their classes can be the deciding factor

This study investigated how mindset intervention in freshman engineering courses influenced students’ implicit intelligence and self-efficacy beliefs. An intervention which bolsters students’ beliefs that they possess the cognitive tools to perform well in their classes can be the deciding factor in their decision to continue in their engineering major. Treatment was administered across four sections of an introductory engineering course where two professors taught two sections. Across three survey points, one course of each professor received the intervention while the other remained neutral, but the second time point switched this condition, so all students received intervention. Robust efficacy and mindset scales quantitatively measured the strength of their beliefs in their abilities, general and engineering, and if they believed they could change their intelligence and abilities. Repeated measures ANOVA and linear regressions revealed that students who embody a growth mindset tended to have stronger and higher self-efficacy beliefs. With the introduction of intervention, the relationship between mindset and self-efficacy grew stronger and more positive over time.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05