Matching Items (3)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

133398-Thumbnail Image.png

Development of a Wearable Haptic Feedback System for Use in Lower-Limb Prosthetics: Proof of Concept and Verification

Description

Skin and muscle receptors in the leg and foot provide able-bodied humans with force and position information that is crucial for balance and movement control. In lower-limb amputees however, this vital information is either missing or incomplete. Amputees typically compensate

Skin and muscle receptors in the leg and foot provide able-bodied humans with force and position information that is crucial for balance and movement control. In lower-limb amputees however, this vital information is either missing or incomplete. Amputees typically compensate for the loss of sensory information by relying on haptic feedback from the stump-socket interface. Unfortunately, this is not an adequate substitute. Areas of the stump that directly interface with the socket are also prone to painful irritation, which further degrades haptic feedback. The lack of somatosensory feedback from prosthetic legs causes several problems for lower-limb amputees. Previous studies have established that the lack of adequate sensory feedback from prosthetic limbs contributes to poor balance and abnormal gait kinematics. These improper gait kinematics can, in turn, lead to the development of musculoskeletal diseases. Finally, the absence of sensory information has been shown to lead to steeper learning curves and increased rehabilitation times, which hampers amputees from recovering from the trauma. In this study, a novel haptic feedback system for lower-limb amputees was develped, and studies were performed to verify that information presented was sufficiently accurate and precise in comparison to a Bertec 4060-NC force plate. The prototype device consisted of a sensorized insole, a belt-mounted microcontroller, and a linear array of four vibrotactile motors worn on the thigh. The prototype worked by calculating the center of pressure in the anteroposterior plane, and applying a time-discrete vibrotactile stimulus based on the location of the center of pressure.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

136785-Thumbnail Image.png

Exploring the Design of Vibrotactile Cues for Visio-Haptic Sensory Substitution

Description

This paper presents the design and evaluation of a haptic interface for augmenting human-human interpersonal interactions by delivering facial expressions of an interaction partner to an individual who is blind using a visual-to-tactile mapping of facial action units and emotions.

This paper presents the design and evaluation of a haptic interface for augmenting human-human interpersonal interactions by delivering facial expressions of an interaction partner to an individual who is blind using a visual-to-tactile mapping of facial action units and emotions. Pancake shaftless vibration motors are mounted on the back of a chair to provide vibrotactile stimulation in the context of a dyadic (one-on-one) interaction across a table. This work explores the design of spatiotemporal vibration patterns that can be used to convey the basic building blocks of facial movements according to the Facial Action Unit Coding System. A behavioral study was conducted to explore the factors that influence the naturalness of conveying affect using vibrotactile cues.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

133624-Thumbnail Image.png

Noninvasive and Accurate Fine Motor Rehabilitation Through a Rhythm Based Game Using a Leap Motion Controller: Usability Evaluation of Leap Motion Game

Description

This paper presents a system to deliver automated, noninvasive, and effective fine motor rehabilitation through a rhythm-based game using a Leap Motion Controller. The system is a rhythm game where hand gestures are used as input and must match the

This paper presents a system to deliver automated, noninvasive, and effective fine motor rehabilitation through a rhythm-based game using a Leap Motion Controller. The system is a rhythm game where hand gestures are used as input and must match the rhythm and gestures shown on screen, thus allowing a physical therapist to represent an exercise session involving the user's hand and finger joints as a series of patterns. Fine motor rehabilitation plays an important role in the recovery and improvement of the effects of stroke, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and more. Individuals with these conditions possess a wide range of impairment in terms of fine motor movement. The serious game developed takes this into account and is designed to work with individuals with different levels of impairment. In a pilot study, under partnership with South West Advanced Neurological Rehabilitation (SWAN Rehab) in Phoenix, Arizona, we compared the performance of individuals with fine motor impairment to individuals without this impairment to determine whether a human-centered approach and adapting to an user's range of motion can allow an individual with fine motor impairment to perform at a similar level as a non-impaired user.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05