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Developing Team Skills and Attitudes through Interprofessional Leadership Competencies

Description

The health care industry increasingly recognizes interprofessional collaboration (IPC) as the key to optimizing delivery of care, and interprofessional education (IPE) has been the foundational method for building IPC. When

The health care industry increasingly recognizes interprofessional collaboration (IPC) as the key to optimizing delivery of care, and interprofessional education (IPE) has been the foundational method for building IPC. When IPC is examined, leadership skills of the practitioners are often seen as a positive force for optimizing team performance. This project aimed to deliver an education session sharing interprofessional leadership (IPL) competencies and the effect they may have on attitudes toward IPC. A pilot was designed for a single site, a student run clinic in a large city in the Southwest United States, which serves as a learning laboratory to help future health practitioners grow IPC skills through effective and innovative IPE. A search of the available evidence supporting this project revealed that educational activities delivered to practitioners can build the leadership skills seen in effective IPC.

During the Fall 2017 semester, the education sessions were delivered to student practitioners at the clinic during their semester-long rotation. The University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire, designed to measure self-assessment of attitudes toward collaborative learning and collaborative working, was deployed at the beginning and end of a semester-long rotation to all students working at the clinic to look for changes. A low sample size limited results to assessment of clinical significance, but showed some changes that could be significant if the project continues. Clinically significant changes show an increase in students’ rating of their own skills and preferences toward interprofessional practice. In keeping with the learning laboratory model at the clinic, these outcomes support continued delivery and examination of the education model with subsequent clinic rotations to strengthen the conclusions being drawn from the results.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-30

Interprofessional Collaborative Education in Mental Health: Exploring Attitudes and Beliefs About Collaboration and Teamwork

Description

Purpose: Assess provider perceptions on care coordination, collaboration, teamwork, and shared decision-making practices pre and post a brief educational intervention on interprofessional collaboration (IPC).

Background and significance: A lack of care

Purpose: Assess provider perceptions on care coordination, collaboration, teamwork, and shared decision-making practices pre and post a brief educational intervention on interprofessional collaboration (IPC).

Background and significance: A lack of care coordination and active follow up in the outpatient setting of individuals living with mental illness places this population at high risk for developing various comorbidities. Care coordination across care providers and patients in a IPC, patient-centered treatment model of care is an intervention that can reduce this barrier to care.

Methods: At a behavioral health clinic in the southwestern United States (U.S.) twenty-two participants were assessed via the Collaborative Practice Assessment Tool (CPAT), before and after an educational presentation on IPC care. The CPAT is a tool that was developed to assess collaborative practice within teams and help identify needs for professional development.

Results: Statistical significance was found from pretest to posttest scores (t(21) = -1.936, p = .066). Statistical significance was found in two of the eight domains; mission, meaningful purpose, and goals (p = .009) and decision-making and conflict management (p = .058). Increases in posttest scores were seen in all eight domains.

Conclusions: Training behavioral health professionals in IPC practice and teambuilding may facilitate improved clinical team experiences and communication. Behavioral health professionals treating individuals living with serious mental illness (SMI), IPC training could prepare providers to work more effectively and efficiently in the delivery of patient-centered care in this population with complex health care needs.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-04